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I'd most like to (personally) explore:

Displaying poll results.
My own town
  1165 votes / 8%
The Antarctic
  1473 votes / 10%
Caves
  1429 votes / 9%
The ocean floor
  2642 votes / 18%
Jungles
  1589 votes / 11%
Deserts
  587 votes / 4%
Just the rest of the basement, thanks
  1488 votes / 10%
Some other part of Earth
  3933 votes / 27%
14306 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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I'd most like to (personally) explore:

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  • In the UK there is pretty much nothing that can hurt you by way of flora and fawna (bee stings and bramble prickles aside).

    I would love to trek through a rain forest but I'm just too scared of biting insects, angry animals and the myriad of harmful things that might make me uncomfortable or worse.

    • by KingOfBLASH (620432) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @09:01AM (#47641365) Journal

      Death can come for you anywhere. One day, walking through a cross walk in a major city during the middle of the day, I was nearly hit by an asshole driving around a corner too fast in a very nice BMW. I jumped out of the way just in time but the car hit my groceries.

      Live your life. Take reasonable precautions like having a guide take you through the jungle, or going with an instructor if you try something dangerous in the beginning, like rally racing. But always live your life, like today was your last day. The world is on fire, and we never know how long we have left.

      (Although in fairness we didn't start the fire [youtube.com])

      • by Anonymous Coward on Monday August 11, 2014 @03:40AM (#47645411)

        But always live your life, like today was your last day. The world is on fire, and we never know how long we have left.

        Bad advice. If you live life like today's your last, you'll act without consequence and without concern for the ramifications of your actions. It's one of the reasons I hate that term YOLO (You Only Live Once) - it's basically a passport towards dangerous and counterproductive behavior. People need to learn how to think long-term - we've got enough problems in the world due to short-term thinking fucking up things down the line.

        Of course it's all about balance. Don't be so concerned about things that you won't take any risks. Just make sure those risks are measure and that whatever you end up doing doesn't end up hurting yourself (or others) later.

        • The parents was talking about being too afraid to go out into the jungle.

          While I would agree that you shouldn't live completely like it's your last day (you do want to save up for things like, say, retirement), you should conquer your fears for the little things, and you can do this with a sense of balance

          • by Kelbear (870538) on Tuesday August 12, 2014 @01:39PM (#47656421)

            I like the advice I heard from an economist on a Freakonomics podcast when asked by a teenager what economics can teach us about romance(specifically with regard to asking a girl out to prom).

            The economist starts off by admitting he doesn't know anything more than anyone else on romance. But he suggested that many people suffer from "loss aversion", a tendency to strongly prefer avoiding losses to acquiring gains( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/L... [wikipedia.org] ). The young man was afraid of rejection, which might sting briefly, but will likely have minimal negative impact and likely no long term impact. But if she says yes, he'd have a date to prom and a memory of prom he can look back on for years. The guy was just focused on the possibility of rejection.

            Unfortunately, "Reduce your loss aversion" isn't as catchy as "YOLO" or "Carpe Diem". But it's more practical life advice for many people.

        • by Kjella (173770)

          Bad advice. If you live life like today's your last, you'll act without consequence and without concern for the ramifications of your actions. It's one of the reasons I hate that term YOLO (You Only Live Once) - it's basically a passport towards dangerous and counterproductive behavior.

          YOLO is just the modern day equivalent of carpe diem - seize the day, but Latin is no longer in fashion. It doesn't mean you shouldn't study to your degree, but those years as a student aren't just a means to an end you need to get through they're your life. Same goes for your job, if all you live for is career and promotion then life is passing you by. If you want to go on safari in Africa, do it. If you want to try sky diving, do it. If you want to hit on that girl you fancy, do it. If the sun is shining

      • by geekoid (135745)

        Yes, but you are more likely to die in 'the jungle' then walking down the street.

        "like today was your last day"
        In my living room with my family? Cause, if ti was my last day, the last thing I would want to e is in the middle of nowhere with none of my loved ones.
        I know this because I've been in the middle of nowhere, and after the 4th day of crawling I was pretty sure I was going to die. At that point going out and living that way seemed both selfish, and sad.
        Looking back, I'm pretty sure people would have

        • You can go into the jungle without going all survivorman.

          Why do people always have to take things to extremes?

          You can face your fears and do something a little dangerous that is 99% safe without going and doing something a lot dangerous that is not safe at all.

          • by geekoid (135745)

            I didn't intend to be stuck in the situation I found myself in; which wasn't actually a jungle, I was just using it as an example of why the poster was being pretty fallacious, and a little uppity telling people what they should do.

            I went miniature golfing with my son yesterday, and I'll take that over being where that situation could occur again.

            • Yeah see you're starting to stink of b.s.

              If you go out into the wilderness, anywhere, there as some common sense things you should do. Like not go alone. And tell people your route. And only go on well known trails. And not eat random mushrooms / berries you find growing by the side of the road, or drink out of random pools of water. And always bring appropriate gear.

              If you do that, you will come back alive, and even if something bad happens (like you break your leg), either your buddy will go for help

    • by xaxa (988988)

      Earlier this year I went to the Cuyabana reserve in Ecuador. There wasn't really any reason to be scared of the jungle.

      You wouldn't know where to go on your own, and organising transport would be a hassle anyway, so book an organised tour. I was travelling round Ecuador alone, and there were five others on my tour. A 12 hour bus journey to Lago Agrio, a 2.5 hour car drive east, then a 2.5 hour motor canoe journey and we were very much in the jungle.

      (I only spent four nights in the jungle, you can obvious

    • The Antarctic - but scared I'd freeze to death
      Caves - but scared of bats and darkness
      The ocean floor - but scared of drowning
      Jungles - but scared of snakes and spiders and bugs
      Deserts - but scared of getting lost and dying of thirst

    • I come from Australia, where we have the 10 deadliest animals in the world... 11 deadliest if we count humans.

      Want to go to the beach, great white sharks.
      Want to go camping, Taipan and King Brown snakes.
      How about a spot of fishing in a river, nacht. Crocodiles.
      Think your safe in your own home, funnel web spiders think differently.
      And Backpacker murderers, I've survived the lot for over 30 years.

      Most jungles are a walk in the park.
    • by WillKemp (1338605)

      In the UK there is pretty much nothing that can hurt you by way of flora and fawna (bee stings and bramble prickles aside).

      Humans are fauna and the UK is the most violent country I've ever been to (I grew up there). I worked in Afghanistan in 06 and 07 and people would comment on how dangerous it was walking around Kabul - I used to answer "not nearly as dangerous as it is walking around London". One difference between the two cities is that if someone kills you in Kabul, it will be for a reason - in London it's just as likely to be because they don't like your shirt.

      Real jungles are very tame places compared to that concrete o

      • by geekoid (135745)

        No, that's not even close.
        London is 1.80 per 100k; Kabul is 3.4 per 100k

        • by WillKemp (1338605)

          1.8 what? If you're talking about deaths, then so what? The difference between 0.0018% and 0.0034% is minimal. But I'm talking about danger in general, not just danger of death. The chance of getting randomly bashed by a gang of drunken thugs on the streets of Kabul is zero - in London, it's high.

    • In the UK there is pretty much nothing that can hurt you by way of flora and fawna (bee stings and bramble prickles aside).

      Well, someone got repeatedly bitten by an adder recently. But given that he'd apparently picked up... well there's just no helping some people, is there?

      • by splodus (655932)

        Hadn't heard that - just looked it up; interesting.

        Strangely enough I've seen adders only a couple of times, once near some cliffs in Devon close to home and another time about half a dozen on moorland in Cornwall in the middle of a path. I've lived in the countryside all my life so I guess I think of adders as unlikely attackers, a bit like hornets. I've heard Giant Hogweed is about the worst plant in the UK but I've never seen it (as far as I know!).

    • by mendax (114116)

      In the UK there is pretty much nothing that can hurt you by way of flora and fawna (bee stings and bramble prickles aside).

      I seem to recall running into (literally) some poison ivy (or something resembling it) in the remains of Sherwood Forest off the A1 (I think) on a visit to the UK many years ago. I didn't think it grew in the UK but my skin said otherwise. It's a bit worse than having to deal with bramble prickles.

      • by splodus (655932)

        I'm guessing you would have recognised stinging nettles.

        The other plant in the UK that 'stings' is giant hogweed. I've never come across it but it is supposed to be widespread. The sap causes burns and scarring. There was a campaign about 40 years ago to warn children about it and I remember someone coming into our school with pictures of it - it looks a bit like cow parsley but grows much bigger.

  • I'd like to be on some beautiful beach, with perfect weather, and lots of gorgeous girls in bikinis.
    • by TWX (665546)
      So, Kauai then...

      I've been to Oahu and Kauai. Oahu was nice enough and would probably be where I'd have to live if I moved to Hawaii, mainly due to employment possibilities.

      Kauai was outright gorgeous and I had a moment at the Northern end of Polihale where I was the only one there. I had the clean sand, blue water, and rugged cliffs all to myself, not another soul in sight. I walked back South a half-mile, there were people frolicking in the surf. The Northwest, Southwest, South, Southeast, Northe
      • So, Kauai then...

        I've been to Oahu and Kauai. Oahu was nice enough and would probably be where I'd have to live if I moved to Hawaii, mainly due to employment possibilities.

        Kauai was outright gorgeous and I had a moment at the Northern end of Polihale where I was the only one there. I had the clean sand, blue water, and rugged cliffs all to myself, not another soul in sight. I walked back South a half-mile, there were people frolicking in the surf. The Northwest, Southwest, South, Southeast, Northeast, and North parts of the island each had a different feel, so if I were independently wealthy I could easily live on Kauai for some time before getting island-fever.

        It's nice to live on an island with no large cities.

    • I'd like to be on some beautiful beach, with perfect weather, and lots of gorgeous girls in bikinis.

      Beaches definitely should have been an option.

      One beach is fine, but I would prefer to explore all of the beaches in the world. After all, it would be nice to have some variety in both beaches and women... All I would need is a yacht to carry toys such as jetskis, a motor launch, kayaks, etc.

      The Jungle would be fun as I don't mind snakes, spiders, etc. However, I do hate mosquitoes and flies. The amount of OFF bug spray I would have to bring just wouldn't make it worth it. The Desserts are too dry, Cav

  • by tlambert (566799) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @03:18AM (#47640679)

    Missing option: The planet of another star

    • by TWX (665546)
      I don't think that it's missing. I like the poll being limited to possibilities that are theoretically within the grasp of the average person if they chose to apply their own income toward that long-term goal.

      Don't get me wrong, I feel that we need a space station in a better location (at least geostationary orbit if not a Lagrange point), a lunar base as a testbed for other planetary-landing missions, and tech to make human habitation of space better (at least a Stanford Torus or possibly an O'Neill Cy
    • by H0p313ss (811249)

      Missing option: The planet of another star

      SQUEEEEEE!

    • by Kjella (173770)

      The only thing you'd be likely to find is gas and rock. And Germans, where they can tank their cars and listen to heavy rock there'll be Germans.

    • by dywolf (2673597)

      THANK YOU!
      I knew i couldn't be the only one.
      Poll needs space as an option.

    • by MrL0G1C (867445)

      'The universe' was the option I was looking for.

  • Various cities. New York and Paris would be a good start.
    • What's stopping you from making it happen?

      • lack of time and finances.

        • by rastos1 (601318)
          Also the fact that when you arrive to the place it is so packed with tourists and locals trying to milk the tourists, that it takes all the fun away.
          • if you have some time and medium financial availability, go to Europe, buy a month-long, European-wide train ticket (last time I checked it was around 1K USD) and you will be able to travel ANYWHERE in Europe, using any train bar bullet trains (unless you are willing to pay a per-trip difference), get off wherever you want, hop into any other train and visit places where tourists don't go.

            e.g. you're in a train and see something beautiful, you get off at next stop and explore.
            Almost all villages and small t

      • by gronofer (838299)
        Entirely money. A few months in an expensive city (I could add Melbourne, Hong Kong, Berlin) would cost a fortune. I'm not good at making money, especially since I quit being an employee.
      • by rastos1 (601318)

        What's stopping you from making it happen?

        In USA: TSA. No fly list. Constitution free zones ...

      • What's stopping you from making it happen?

        THIS. The presupposition of this survey is that we are all somehow trapped.

    • by TWX (665546)
      I loved London, hated Paris. Went to London first, which one would think would have helped (ie, acclimated to earlier shop hours and all of the walking, etc) but it really didn't. I found Paris to be a sprawling, drab, worn, somewhat modern/postwar city but with a general lacking of height. I imagine that war has been harsh, but it still didn't help that after only a few hours most of the buildings looked the same and that the food choices were surprisingly chain-oriented compared to the promise of indep
      • You had a COMPLETELY different experience to me in Paris. I have been there 3-4 times now and love it and the places you can find tucked into small corners. There are restaurants everywhere and there was always someone nearby who would speak English to me if I needed help.

        As for restaurants did you try walking from the Eiffel Tower to the Arc de Triomphe? There are a gazzilion on that strip alone. And Paris is the only city I can think of where you seriously need to check out the cemeteries. Particular

        • by H0p313ss (811249)

          You had a COMPLETELY different experience to me in Paris. I have been there 3-4 times now and love it and the places you can find tucked into small corners. There are restaurants everywhere and there was always someone nearby who would speak English to me if I needed help.

          As for restaurants did you try walking from the Eiffel Tower to the Arc de Triomphe? There are a gazzilion on that strip alone. And Paris is the only city I can think of where you seriously need to check out the cemeteries. Particularly the catacombs.

          That's more in line with my experience with Paris, the three days I spent there were nowhere near enough.

          • by Kittenman (971447)
            Someone has to say it - "When good Americans die, they go to Paris".

            I never understood the love affair of the US with France (in general) and Paris (in particular). France has it's attractions - but why so much to the US?
      • by GlennC (96879)

        I fear that I'd dislike Germany

        Having been to Munich several times, I can say that you probably wouldn't have many of the problems you say you had in Paris.

        There are different neighborhoods in Munich where the buildings don't all look the same. The older section of the city center does have a very similar look to it, but there's still enough variation to make it interesting. While there are many chain restaurants for those who want them, with a little effort you can find interesting local places. In fact

  • Sailling to Easter Island (and some other islands) is something I've wanted to do for many years. I have a high degree and education in maritime navigation, and some (but not enough) practical experience in sailing, but the cost of a worthy boat sort of breaks this dream of mine.
  • by scotts13 (1371443) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @08:24AM (#47641275)

    I'm more a historian than an explorer. It really bothers me to walk around my former mining town, only 150 years old, and there are old structures (foundations, dams, remnants of bridges, etc.) that no one remember what they were from. Wish there were easier ways to research them; have to get to work on that flux capacitor.

    • "have to get to work on that flux capacitor."

      Why reinvent the wheel? Just go to O'Reilly auto parts and you could be on your way tomorrow!

      http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/EB00/121G.oap?keyword=121g

      http://www.oreillyauto.com/site/c/detail/EB00/121GMF.oap?keyword=121gmf

      However you have to provide your own DeLorean....at least they are still available!

      http://delorean.com/
  • by PolygamousRanchKid (1290638) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @08:56AM (#47641355)

    You see different footprints from different programmers who have maintained it . . . recognize different personalities in the style and comments . . . you can tell if the project was a joy or a Death March . . . and I always learn how to do something that I didn't know before.

  • by alfredo (18243) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @10:56AM (#47641795)
    would love to go back into the caves of Kentucky, Indiana, Ohio, and Tennessee. It's like mountain climbing upside down and at night.
  • Requisite components:
    Exotic city
    Pretty woman
    Valuable antiquities
    Foe, to be vanquished
    Adoring mob
    • by geekoid (135745)

      Heart to be ripped out, atomic bombs to hide from, aliens, and an All the Nazi you can kill buffet.

  • Missing: Space - the final frontier!

  • by Nidi62 (1525137) on Sunday August 10, 2014 @03:11PM (#47643007)
    I would love to go visit islands like Guadalcanal, Pelileu, Iwo Jima, Betio, etc. Walking along the beaches or under the jungle canopies knowing what people went through on those spots 70 years ago and not knowing what you might find in some long-forgotten cave or jungle clearing would have to be an incredibly haunting and moving experience.
    • by netsavior (627338)
      it sounds dumb, but I thought FarCry 3 did a really good job in building this kind of "feeling"
      it is a psudo-open world which hints that you are on a pacific theater island long forgotten by governments (and since taken over by drug runners) after WW2. You find fortified caves with decayed weaponry, bunkers, etc. You get the feeling you described... except with 'the requisite splosions and video game stuff

      I am not meaning to trivialize what you are taking about, but you can get a small taste of what y
    • I sailed past Peleliu in 1994, the 50th anniversary of the battle. It was horrible to see that insignificant hunk of rock where so many young men died for... what, exactly? It was dubiously important in the first place and looked an awful lot like other rocky islands I'd seen, which drove home the utter futility and waste that it represents. It was a very emotional experience and I'm getting choked up now remembering it.

      I'd be perfectly happy never seeing another battlefield in my life.

  • No question, particularly in Arizona. The lack of rain makes it "older" on the surface, less erosion. I would love to build a giant metal detector and go searching for meteoroids and the like. I lived in Phoenix and miss roaming around the govt. land, which is plentiful, so there isn't anyone to ask permission. Just do the roaming in the winter, which is very mild, bring lots of water and curiosity. The mountains are climbable and everything is fairly accessible. You can bet most every day will be sun

  • It would be awesome to visit the super-massive black-hole in the center of our Milky Way Galaxy, and if done at near light-speed the journey would feel like the blink of an eye. Actually that's not a bad way to travel if you don't mind solitude. A blink, and earth fizzles away but you're in another galaxy... I wonder how many fantastic sites or blinks you could have before the universe ended? Failing any of that the only other place I can visit in the blink of an eye is my own town.
    • I've always been a bit worried about the response time for the stop button at near light speeds. Press the stop button and by the time the circuits have reacted, you're a few thousand light years beyond your target and have to turn around and go back.

      • by BobNET (119675)

        Press the stop button and by the time the circuits have reacted, you're a few thousand light years beyond your target and have to turn around and go back.

        That's ludicrous!

  • by PPH (736903)

    I would like to have seen Montana.

  • It goes without saying that as a corollary I'd like to both have the means and live sufficiently long to accomplish this.
    • by Lumpy (12016)

      All you need is money. Everything else can be bought with that money.

  • Go where no nerd has gone before...

  • As long as we're talking about places on Earth, and not space or other planets / moons, I might as well be exploring its sky. There's no joy like flying free !

  • Northern Canada (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Lumpy (12016) on Monday August 11, 2014 @10:14AM (#47646957) Homepage

    Far more there to explore than anything else. just simply avoid getting eaten by bears and you are good to go.

    • Forget the bears, unless you go in winter when things are a little nippy, it's being eaten alive by the mosquitoes and various other nasty flies that you have to worry about!
  • The jungle, caves and the ocean are great and all... But underground lakes such as Lake Vostok probably have some pretty cool life that has been totally isolated for millions of years within them.
  • the U.S. government considers me a criminal so I don't.

    When I have to worry more about being put on some "subversive" flight list for no known reason, with no way to get off the list unless filing court papers, the investigations and groping just to get on a plane, than I do about getting some disease or being eaten by an animal, things are completely messed up.

  • We recently moved (only a couple month ago), and while it's a small town we're in, I'm still discovering new things all the time. It feels a bit foolish for me to spend a lot of money traveling to distant places to explore them, when I can't even say I feel like I'm an expert on what's in my own home-town yet!

  • by whyde (123448) on Monday August 11, 2014 @10:48AM (#47647259)

    I just got back from exploring Iceland, and was left wishing I had waaaaaay more time to spend there. The differences in a "young earth" geography are striking, and someplace cooler than my local climes is much appreciated in mid-Summer.

  • I've spent my entire life in the hustle-bustle. I want to go on a cycling tour of villages, towns, and nowheresvilles.

  • The two most relevant options for me would be either "My Country", or "The Universe". I might have to stick to my country for a while though. I am already exploring my city.

  • I've been to Australia and New Zealand, but want to go further south: the Falklands or Patagonia. I know the Falklands look like Newfoundland with penguins, and I know Ushuaia is horizontal rain/sleet all year, but I want to see it for myself.

    ...laura

  • I noticed recently that because of the coastal mountains, the rivers near São Paulo mostly flow inland into the la Plata basin (which is a very large watershed). From what I can see from Google Earth it should be possible to kayak down the Tietê River [wikipedia.org] to where it joins the other major rivers that eventually meet the Atlantic near Buenos Aires.

    I may now be too old to consider a month long river journey that's almost a quarter of a planet away, but I can dream about it.

  • volcanoes, plate tech, stressed rocks....Idaho

  • I spent the morning taking a ride in a hot air balloon. That's a unique perspective on the sky, even if you fly in airplanes a lot. Highly recommend it. I've been skydiving the past couple years but think I want to hang out in the sky longer. Might have to take up paragliding or one of the other gliding spots. I don't suppose I'd find much there, but that doesn't mean it wouldn't be fun to explore. In '15 or '16 I want to go wingsuit flying over Hawaii from one of their dropzones.
  • Ancient ruins. Basically I want to be a wizard Indiana Jones.

    • by Kittenman (971447)

      Ancient ruins. Basically I want to be a wizard Indiana Jones.

      With you there. I'd like to see Persepolis and Petra. I've lived in Rome, seen Athens -and the most amazing thing I've seen is Abu Simbel, in southern Egypt. Over two thousand years old, and it looks like the painters just nipped around the corner when they heard you coming.

  • yea, i know. i got no life.
  • Colorado Plateau
  • We would like to explore.. other options.

Those who do things in a noble spirit of self-sacrifice are to be avoided at all costs. -- N. Alexander.

 



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