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Comment Re:No, I'm really not (Score 1) 315

The thing is, I don't want to count on everyone having the latest version.

Yes you do. That way developers using those bleeding-edge features can find the rough edges and get them fixed, and you can use their tested descendants a year later. If those features aren't delivered to end users, no one can test and learn from them and they don't become mainstream.

Comment Re:Stalking Horse? (Score 1) 137

Thus for most normal Blackberry users (non-corporate), their secure end to end communications begin and end at Blackberry's servers.

That's not a definition of "end to end" that I'm familiar with. Beyond that, how does Blackberry's "network operator" setup differ from Apple's Messages where Apple handles the message routing and delivery, except that Apple devices encrypt and decrypt on the user's hardware (which is the normal definition of "end to end")?

Comment Re:Har har har? (Score 1) 231

Yes, but you save time by not indenting

I'm asking this seriously: what text editor do you use that you can easily not indent? I use Emacs (and Vim and Sublime Text and Atom) and automatically get thr correct indentation just by writing code like I normally would. If I type if foo: and hit enter, the cursor will be placed correctly for the next thing I type. This isn't Python-specific, either. I get the same behavior when writing C, Go, JS, shell scripts, and so on.

I love dealing with a language that's explicit about what I mean. Consider how incredibly dangerous it is to write code that's not actually indented the way it's meant to be executed. Lots of eyes looked at that C code and didn't notice that the formatting was inconsistent with its parsing. That would not have been a problem in a language that uses indent to describe intent.

Comment Re:Har har har? (Score 1) 231

You know, as much as I hear that whine, in 16 years of writing Python I've literally never once been bitten by it. Yes, you hate having to indent your code the way you would naturally have indented it anyway, left to your own devices. Sure, writing at-a-glance understandable clauses is torture. Oh yeah, I too hate formatting my stuff the way my coworkers / teachers / project maintainers / colleagues expect to find it. But as much as I love writing the horrible, unformatted mess that you also enjoy, I just can't make this hypothetical copy-and-paste problem manifest itself in reality. Curse you, Python!

Comment Re:Another Twitter case study (Score 1) 519


Twitter is just one platform among many, and before it we've always given people public platforms to say dumb, career-ending things. You know, you can still (and always could!) say offensive things. The trick is to say it in such a way as to get your point across before others stop listening.

Dumb statement: Hitler wasn't all bad!

Better statement: Although Hitler committed great atrocities, it is important we remember he was a human and capable of good, too, so that we don't forget that danger always walks among us.

Same sentiment; more tactful delivery. This is what politicians are supposed to be able to do. That Kimmel was unable is a good sign that he should not be an elected representative. Lots of people have successfully used Twitter (and other social media platforms) to say lots of non-mainstream things without making legions of enemies.

Submission + - Amino Harnesses Health Industry Data for Consumers (

Just Some Guy writes: Amino's free service lets users find and book an appointment with a doctor based on their experience with the visitor's needs. Powered by a comprehensive, patient de-identified database of health care experiences from 188 million Americans and nearly every doctor in America, Amino aims to help users make more confident decisions about their health care.

Comment Re:Wot (Score 2) 120

not making Houghton Mifflin or Steven King rich.

Stephen King would make out just fine under a shorted copyright. Love him or hate him, that guy works for his living. He's the exact opposite of someone writing a single book then sitting back and waiting for their ship to come in.

Comment Re:Why don't taxis just provide good service?! (Score 1) 136

The medallions avoid a couple things,
- drivers charging on a hail unsafely then haggling over who can carry them
- lots of empty cabs driving around

Gas prices and the expense of operating a vehicle in the city takes care of the second. Taxi companies won't run cabs if they're not making money, so the problem is self-limiting. Medallions only serve to artificially limit supply.

Comment Re:Cool article... (Score 2) 136

One of the reasons Uber, Lyft and all the other "ride sharing" app companies get so much flack because they are breaking the law.

I'd be more sympathetic if 1) Uber and Lyft were offering the same services as taxis (you can't flag down an Uber; you have to request one), and 2) many jurisdictions hadn't already ruled that you're wrong.

It is easier to change the specification to fit the program than vice versa.