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Comment: Re:Desalinate Hadera style (Score 1) 414

by Harlequin80 (#49312697) Attached to: How 'Virtual Water' Can Help Ease California's Drought

Doesn't even need to be desalination. Recycle the water from the treatment plants back into your reservoirs. Water is treated as a one way system, it comes in the top, gets treated, gets made dirty, gets treated, gets dumped. It makes no sense. Just change the Gets Dumps to gets put back in the top.

Comment: And the almond trees die. (Score 4, Insightful) 414

by Harlequin80 (#49312643) Attached to: How 'Virtual Water' Can Help Ease California's Drought

This plan seems to forget that it takes time to grow these crops. It takes 3 years for your first crop of almonds and 8 before the tree is delivering anything like commercial quantities. These trees have decades of work invested in them and the posts suggestion of ripping out the crop is stupid.

There are lots and lots of ways to lower the water usage of both the general population and water intensive applications such as farming. Are all the irrigation channels covered? That makes a huge difference. Installing dual flush toilets, recommending low flow shower heads. South East Queensland went through an 8 year drought and people were encouraged to bring their water usage down to 200l per person per day. That may still seem a lot but it is significantly lower than the normal usage.

From there you also have to look at recycled water. What happens to the waste water once it has been treated? Using RO membrane treatment plants the water is purer then what falls from the sky, so pipe that back into your reservoirs instead of dumping it in the river / ocean.

Comment: Re:Yeah because you know... (Score 1) 224

by Harlequin80 (#49307077) Attached to: Chevy Malibu 'Teen Driver' Tech Will Snitch If You Speed

A late 2000s base model suburu impreza is the perfect new driver car. 2.0l 4wd, non turbo, fast enough to do the speed limit but slow enough to not get yourself in trouble. And they are bullet proof. And for the vanity concious teenage they look pretty decent.

Given it will be 12 years before my eldest is on the road though my impreza will probably be long gone by then

Comment: Re:Doesn't matter (Score 2) 224

by Harlequin80 (#49307039) Attached to: Chevy Malibu 'Teen Driver' Tech Will Snitch If You Speed

Getting a shiny new car for your first car is typically a symptom of being a spoiled brat.

No it doesn't. I know that the first years of driving are the ones you are most at risk. Having come very close to being a blood splat more than a few times I will be aiming to buy my kids as close to a new car as possible because the safety is higher and the service history is more known. A new car doesn't equal a fast car. I would rather that my daughters are driving a new sedan like a Camry than a 15 year old version of the same car.

Comment: Standard practice for a department (Score 3, Insightful) 200

by Harlequin80 (#49298859) Attached to: NZ Customs Wants Power To Require Passwords

A department such as customs, police, wellfare etc. will always ask for the maximum possible powers. It is a given. There can be no argument against the fact that a speed camera on every light pole will lower the amount of speeders (either by fear or getting them off the roads). The police therefore will ask for that.

The role of the legislative body is to control the power of the departments and offset their wants against the negative outcomes of those wants. *Customs* We want everyone's password *Legislature* No, but you can seize equipment and a password may be demanded by a judge.

The fact that they don't always get it right is a different issue.

Comment: Re:But will anyone actually buy them? (Score 1) 451

by Harlequin80 (#49298209) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

Firstly you are a cock. Just because something is outside your experience doesn't mean people are liars or outliers. Nothing in my post deserved your abuse.

Secondly, I live in an area zoned park residential which is 21km from the centre of a major city of over 2 million people and is Australia's 3rd largest. The greater region has a population of 4 million. By the 2011 census the total population in my area, the Greater Samford Valley was 14.5k and there is only 1 commercial area that services the region, commonly called Samford Village. This serves the entire population of the region. It is my closes commercial zoning unless you want to count a nursery / garden centre.

As for my electricity or my water or anything else. I am considered a suburb of Brisbane and as such have nice underground electricity and telephone. I don't pay any extra charges to be connected to the grid or anything else. I am serviced by a regular bus that runs past the end of my street and connects me to large scale malls and the train network.

Finally, If you would like to fix your ignorance here is a link to a google map of the area - https://goo.gl/maps/mzDPO if you zoom out slightly you will see that city of millions that I and many others commute quite happily to from our middle of fucking nowhere outlier.

Comment: Re:But will anyone actually buy them? (Score 1) 451

by Harlequin80 (#49297001) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

If it was a 2 minute wait then maybe. But there is no way that it would be. The economics of it just couldn't work. I live on acreage and my corner store is 6km away. It would be the only logical location for a base. That means it is 10 minutes out at an absolute minimum. On top of that they would need to ensure that they never have 100% utilisation even in peak times.

Given there are 7000 homes in my area they would need thousands of vehicles for peak load. The size of the storage facility alone would be insane as all 3000+ vehicles would pretty much be unused a 3am on a tuesday night.

What your model forgets is that almost every house comes with a built in storage facility for a car. Often multiple. If people don't have them parked at their houses they will have to store them somewhere else. For it to be as convenient as you describe they would need a crazy number of these vehicles waiting and ready to go.

Now for a pre-booked ride to the airport, or a self driving taxi. Or even a recurring - pick me up at 7am for work. Perfect. But for the "crap I need x from the supermarket for the dinner I have already started cooking" or the "shit we've run out of nappies" it will fail.

Comment: Re:But will anyone actually buy them? (Score 1) 451

by Harlequin80 (#49290039) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

Disagree.

If a driverless car was in a similar price band to a normal car I would buy one (assuming safe ofcourse). I wouldn't be willing to wait for a car to arrive if I wanted to pop to the shops. The loss of convenience would be too high. So that means I would want to maintain my own transport, given that means I'm going to own a car why wouldn't I own one that could drive itself?

Comment: Re:Self-Driving problems... (Score 1) 451

by Harlequin80 (#49290007) Attached to: Lyft CEO: Self-Driving Cars Aren't the Future

I doubt it. Because that would be poor software design. The software would be looking to avoid accidents in an order of severity. Your pushing off the road at an exist may work but your pushing to increase speed wouldn't.

In most vehicle brakes far exceed the power of the engine. Even in cases where it doesn't the brakes have twice as much contact patch with the road than the engine (unless you are in a 4wd with dual diff locks / limited slip diff). The most sensible and safest tactic is to not accelerate inside the box past a predefined safe speed. So at say 10% over the speed limit the car will refuse to go faster irrespective of how close the rear vehicle comes. Then if the 'tard behind does actually ram or nudge the vehicle the car would then begin to apply the brakes gradually until the vehicle is stopped.

The computer would be able to counteract for rotation as it would have independent control of the brakes for each wheel allowing it to bias front / rear / left / right as required.

Comment: Re:Ridiculous (Score 2) 112

by Harlequin80 (#49289035) Attached to: How To Make Moonshots

There are many ways to fail and few ways to succeed, thus it is better to learn what to do than what not to do.

Except by learning only by succeeding you can be left in the situation where you don't understand why you are succeeding. This means that you have a weak base to refine and expand your base because you don't know how you got where you are.

Comment: Re:meanwhile (Score 1) 342

by Harlequin80 (#49288857) Attached to: UK Chancellor Confirms Introduction of 'Google Tax'

The banks needed the bailouts because people broke the item that they lent. If you lent laptops for a living you will have an estimate of how many are smashed. You will build that into your cost base. If all of a sudden way more laptops get smashed then you ever predicted in your worst nightmare then your business will collapse.

Also you talked about what makes an economy move more. A single large investor will make a bigger difference then 100000 smaller ones even if the total of the smaller far exceeds the larger. This is simply because organising the 100000 smaller is too hard.

Comment: Re:meanwhile (Score 1) 342

by Harlequin80 (#49287521) Attached to: UK Chancellor Confirms Introduction of 'Google Tax'

But what you want already exists in this world. It is called living in a different country. All you are talking about is breaking the US up into its component states and having them as independent countries. Under your system it would only be a matter of time before one state, say california, bans any cars from entering that are non compliant with their regulations. This will then be policed at the border. Over time you will end up not being able to freely travel between states and you may as well have a passport.

I'm sure some of the rapidly developing Asian countries have laws that are what you are looking for.

All the simple programs have been written.

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