Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment Re:They're worthless. (Score 1) 213 213

Yes the LEDs are under the computer's control. But that still doesn't make those LEDs "output devices" in the general sense of the word.

A modern keyboard is both an input and output device. At a high level its primary function is to input things into the computer; however, the USB HID communications are bi-directional communications, there is both Input and Output.
The computer can set the state of LEDs and some other features of the keyboard.

In some cases, the computer can upgrade the firmware on the Keyboard which definitely requires sending output.

Yes, but each of these functions have nothing to do with reading or viewing data, they are all about changing the properties of the device itself (i.e. firmware, indicators, etc.) If this was the definition then anything with a power indicator and power button would be considered an I/O device. But that's not how we define an Output device. An I/O device is all about data, which has nothing to do with the device state.

Comment Re:They're worthless. (Score 1) 213 213

So, by your definition a monitor is not an output device, because "in the general sense of the word, you won't be storing or sending data to another standard device" with it. OK, whatever.

Um, you're deliberately misreading his post. He was talking about the keyboard. The screen at one point was a pure output device where data is stored for the viewer, however brief. That being said, even when the test was written there were monitors with light pens that could be used as input devices, much like touch screens today.

As for keyboards, indicator lights are not considered output as they have nothing to do with reading data, they are purely an indicator function, much like a power light. If you still don't get it, check out the Wikipedia entry for an output device. They have a good explanation. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/...

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 1) 549 549

Interestingly you don't mention how much harder bad weather conditions make driving for human drivers, as well. There is a reason that many more than usual accidents happen when the weather is bad, when it's snowing, late at night (sleepy drivers - never heard about a robot getting sleepy), or when the roads are bad and human drivers think they know it all and can continue at top speeds.

Actually, it always seems like many more than usual accidents happy the first two weeks of the snowy road season, and then people adjust to it.

I suspect that driverless cars would adjust quicker and you'd get better results than human drivers.

Nonetheless, the point that driverless cars need to be tested and verified in these conditions before being approved for general use is valid, though probably obvious.

It may be fairly obvious but I'm thinking that it will be a much harder problem to solve and will take longer than people think.

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 4, Insightful) 549 549

This is one instance where the market can really help. Insurance for these autonomous cars will be lower than manual cars, as they are in fewer accidents. That will encourage their uptake. Of course there will be a time where manual driving will be outlawed, and if you really like driving so much then, take it to the race track and don't let your hobby endanger people who are merely trying to live their lives.

When self-driving cars can negotiate in bad weather conditions (i.e. ice, snow, slush, etc.), that's when I'll buy into your future. There is a reason why Google chose relatively warm, dry areas with typically good weather. Bad weather and poor roads makes things 100x harder for self-driving cars. Not to mention the ability to handle out of ordinary conditions or events. Figure these out, then get back to me about giving up manual driving. Until then, it's a mote point....

Oh, and I forgot to mention that they need to be able to tow things, like boats... Towing is the last thing on Google's mind...

Comment Re:11 rear enders (Score 2) 549 549

This is one instance where the market can really help. Insurance for these autonomous cars will be lower than manual cars, as they are in fewer accidents. That will encourage their uptake. Of course there will be a time where manual driving will be outlawed, and if you really like driving so much then, take it to the race track and don't let your hobby endanger people who are merely trying to live their lives.

When self-driving cars can negotiate in bad weather conditions (i.e. ice, snow, slush, etc.), that's when I'll buy into your future. There is a reason why Google chose relatively warm, dry areas with typically good weather. Bad weather and poor roads makes things 100x harder for self-driving cars. Not to mention the ability to handle out of ordinary conditions or events. Figure these out, then get back to me about giving up manual driving. Until then, it's a mote point....

Comment Re:Meh (Score 1) 62 62

Sorry, but I'm not interested. I'm a huge Commodore fanboy, but the logo isn't even in colour. If you're going to try to cash in on the trademark you bought, at least do it right.
I'll stick with running VICE and UAE on my openpandora, thanks. It has a keyboard, which makes it awesome at emulating computers with keyboards.

The C64 logo might have been in color but the Commodore PET logo was not...

Comment Is VPN the right solution or is it overkill.... (Score 1) 173 173

Yes, you could go through the trouble of setting up VPN, etc. and it would work. But VPN connections can be tricky if you don't know what you are doing.

Personally, I've been using Teamviewer (Free for private use) for remote control. They have Windows, MAC, UNIX, and mobile clients. You do have to know the password on the client that you are connecting to and I believe that you can set it to a permanent one, but I've never needed to. I just get my Dad to read the 4 or 5 digit random number back to me. I believe that you can set it up to be always-on if you buy a license.

https://www.teamviewer.com/en/...

As for monitoring your kid's Internet access, it isn't going to work. He'll quickly find out that Grandpa's computer has access to everything... (grin)

The easiest thing to do is install a monitoring program on his computer and buy a 802.11ac router for home and a router for grandpa that has built-in Parental Controls. You could then check the program logs on your kid's computer and the logs on the router.

Unless you really have your heart set on learning how to configure VPNs and understand IP networking, it's just not worth it for Remote Control and Parental Monitoring.

However, if you also plan to use the link for backups between their home and yours then it might make sense as backup services like Carbonite can be costly. In that case, the Meraki solution proposed by a previous commenter would be a good place to start.

Comment Not going to happen any time soon... (Score 4, Informative) 283 283

Too many internet pages rely on Flash for video and advertisements... and,as much as we hate them, advertisements means money...

I'm not saying that progress isn't being made. Youtube dropped Flash this year and is now using HTML5 as the default for video, but that doesn't fix legacy videos.
http://www.theverge.com/2015/1...

My thought is that Flash will be around for another 3 to 5 years. The quoted "18 months" is just wishful thinking....

Comment Re:So will stacking us vertically (Score 2) 394 394

In trains and busses you look at other people.

True... but... There is usually an aisle between you and the person that you are facing. You aren't literally 12" from their face. It would be more like standing face to face on a crowded subway train for 3 to 6 hours. For most people it's exhausting enough to be that close to someone you don't know for the 15 to 20 minutes to get to your stop, let alone hours....

Plus, just imagine if your facing someone who is coughing and sneezing. Yes, you're close enough on a plane that it's still likely that you would get sick, but at least they aren't sneezing directly into your face.

Comment Re:I believe it... (Score 2) 327 327

I banned Powerpoint presentations. Saves huge amounts of time, and server space. I don't have figures to support it, but I strongly believe it raises moral and stops a decline in general intelligence.

(grin)

Actually, the problem isn't Powerpoint or presentations. The problem is people who do not know how to create or give good presentations.

Most boring presentations fall into the following categories:

1. a presentation that you are forced to attend but that has no direct relevance to you, your job, etc.
2. a presentation with too many details for the time slot. The Presenter speed reads the presentation
3. a presentation where the presenter just reads the presentation. There are no explanations and no expansion on what appears on the slides. You could have just read the presentation in 10 minutes and gotten the same information.
4. a presentation that has not been tailored to the audience.

If you have ever watched a Ted Talk presentation, you will see that they use Powerpoint. The difference is that you are interested in the topic, the presenter is passionate about the topic and tells a story, and the slides include just the major points, they don't go into too much detail.

Oh... and banning Powerpoint just wouldn't work... They would just use Word or, horrors, Excel.... (grin)

Comment Re:Just like any other formal credential (Score 1) 296 296

Maybe we should get rid of *all* formal credentials? Get rid of all licenses, and degrees, along with certs.

A drivers license does not prove you know how to drive. A teaching credential does not prove you are a competent teacher. Does a college degree prove you even know how to read?

And so on, right down the line.

Or, maybe a more intelligent way to look at is: a credential is what it is. It prove you know enough about something to pass the test. No test is ever perfect.

Tech credentials leave a lot to be desired. But, from my experience they are far superior to interview test questions. I have had interview tests from interviewers who were dead wrong. I have had interviewers ask questions that were insane. Besides, what if the interviewing does not like you? Maybe the interviewer does not like your race, gender, nationality, or age - in that case you would be sure to fail. At least certs have a certain objectivity.

A drivers license, or even the drivers test, doesn't prove that you are a good driver. But it does prove that you know the rules of the road, something that most wouldn't study unless they were forced to. I'd rather have people driving knowing the rules of the road even if they aren't the best of drivers.

"And do you think (fop that I am) that I could be the Scarlet Pumpernickel?" -- Looney Tunes, The Scarlet Pumpernickel (1950, Chuck Jones)

Working...