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Submission + - Survey: More Women Are Going Into Programming->

itwbennett writes: Much has been made on Slashdot and elsewhere of the 'the dearth of women in computing.' Indeed, according to U.S. Bureau and Labor Statistics estimates, in 2014 four out of five programmers and software developers in the U.S. were men. But according to a survey conducted this spring by the Application Developers Alliance and IDC, that may be changing. The survey of 855 developers worldwide found that women make up 42% of developers with less than 1 year of experience and 30% of those with between 1 and 5 years of experience. Of course, getting women into programming is one thing; keeping them is the next big challenge.
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Submission + - Sultan of Sound, Dr. James Flanagan, passed away aged 89

An anonymous reader writes: A pioneer in the field of acoustics, Dr. Flanagan provided "the technical foundation for speech recognition, teleconferencing, MP3 music files, and the more efficient digital transmission of human conversation." NYTimes covered his passing with the article ".. who helped make computers talk". An older (2005) "Sultan of Sound" IEEE Spectrum article provides background of his work and impact. His interview (1997) discussing his WWII service, research at AT&T Bell Labs & Rutgers University is part of the IEEE oral history series.

Submission + - Price wars: Counting the cost of drones, planes and satellites->

Hallie Siegel writes: There is a lot of hype and expectation about the potential for commercial drones, especially with respect to imaging, for example using drones to capture aerial imaging in agriculture to identify drought or diseased crops before they spread. But how does drone imaging compare satellite imagery, or data captured by manned aircraft? what are the cost and quality differences? This article breaks it down from an economic perspective. Interesting read.
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Submission + - Watch as a giant Kansas buck is arrowed FEET from a GoPro->

Stone Road Media writes: For years, I’d been trying to capture the exit shot of a bow kill on film. About 5 years ago I started trying to capture the shot using trail cameras. I would position the camera on the trails which I thought I would have the best chance to get a shot, a ground level, POV whitetail hunt. I would set the camera to the longest video mode available and shortest delay, to almost get continuous video. Though I came very close several times, it was difficult to trigger the camera at the precise time a deer got close to my shooting lane. But it fueled my fire and determination to capture an epic kill shot.
As the popularity and availability of POV (Point of View) cameras hit the market, I had a new tool to use to capture my vision. When GoPro released their cameras that could be controlled remotely via the iPhone or Android app, I knew my odds drastically increased. For all intents and purposes, I always thought the POV whitetail hunt would be a doe. Never did I even consider a buck being an option, let alone a buck that would eclipse gross Boone & Crockett. But on that faithful late December evening in Kansas, it all would come together.
I’d be lying if I said I even remember turning the GoPro on from my phone. I believe I did, way early as deer began to funnel into the field. But from the time I saw him, until he went down, I never once thought about the GoPro being on. And it wasn’t until I got out of the stand, that I realized how epic the video might just be. After celebrating the harvest, which gross scored 175 3/8”, we watched the video. As the hunt played out, we knew it was going to be good. But this may just be the greatest POV whitetail hunt that has ever been captured.

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Submission + - Easy-To-Clean Membrane Separates Oil From Water->

ckwu writes: A steel mesh with a novel self-cleaning coating can separate oil and water, easily lifting oil from an oil-water mixture and leaving the water behind. Unlike existing oil-water separation membranes, if the coated mesh gets contaminated with oil, it can be simply rinsed off with water and reused, without needing to be cleaned with detergents. The team was able to use the mesh to lift crude oil from a crude oil-seawater mixture, showcasing the feasibility of oil-spill cleanup. The membrane could also be used to treat oily wastewater and as a protective barrier in industrial sewer outlets to avoid oil discharge.
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Submission + - Future Wearables Could Use Your Body As A Network->

jfruh writes: Many wearable computing devices communicate with each other via Bluetooth, but there's a problem with that: the human body actually absorbs much of the signal, meaning that wearables have to crank up the power (and burn through their battery). Researchers at UC San Diego are exploring a different option: using magnetic signals sent through the body itself rather than the air around it to communicate.
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Submission + - From Train to Car - Copenhagen New All-Electric Carsharing With Public Transit->

dkatana writes: Residents in Copenhagen have a new all-electric, free-floating, carsharing service.

DriveNow is launching today 400 brand new BMW i3 electric cars in the Danish city. The service is one-way, and metered by the minute.

The big news is that residents can sign-up on the spot taking a picture of their drivers' license and a selfie and use their public transport accounts to pay.

There will be a car available every 300 meters, the same distance as bus stops. The cost will be 3.50 kroner ($0.52) per minute driven. If members decide to park the car for a few minutes continuing the rental, those stationary minutes are charged at 2.5 kroner ($0.37). The maximum charge per hour is capped at 190 kroner ($28.50). There is no annual fee.

Denmark is possible the most expensive country in the world to own a car, and most people commute to work by bicycle or public transport.

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Submission + - All Hillary Clinton's Private Emails For $500K->

TheViffer writes: Just as email-gate looked to be winding down, RadarOnline.com has exclusively learned a person claiming to be a computer specialist has come forward with the stunning news that 32,000 emails from Hillary Clinton‘s private email account are up for sale. The price tag — a whopping $500,000!

Promising to give the trove of the former Secretary of State’s emails to the highest bidder, the specialist is showing subject lines as proof of what appear to be legitimate messages.

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Submission + - Dogfooding your REST APIs->

janit writes: RESTful APIs are on the lips of everyone currently. Everyone is got one or will have one very soon. They are always underlined as being full REST APIs. But if you're not fully utilising your API internally, is it really complete and a priority for you?
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Submission + - Pioneer Looks To Laserdisc Tech for Low-Cost LIDAR->

itwbennett writes: Pioneer is developing a 3D LIDAR (light detection and ranging) sensor for use in autonomous vehicles that could be a fraction of the cost of current systems (the company envisions a price point under $83). Key to this is technology related to optical pickups once used in laserdisc players, which Pioneer made for 30 years.
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Submission + - Hacker Threatens To Sell Hillary Clinton's ENTIRE UNRELEASED Private Emails For ->

sharkbiter writes: Just as email-gate looked to be winding down, RadarOnline.com has exclusively learned a person claiming to be a computer specialist has come forward with the stunning news that 32,000 emails from Hillary Clinton‘s private email account are up for sale. The price tag — a whopping $500,000!

Promising to give the trove of the former Secretary of State’s emails to the highest bidder, the specialist is showing subject lines as proof of what appear to be legitimate messages.

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Submission + - Brain-Eating Amoeba Scoffs At Chlorine In Water Pipes->

An anonymous reader writes: The Naegleria fowleri amoeba typical feeds on bacteria in water and soil. Human digestive systems have no problem killing it, but inhaling water that carries the amoeba gives it the opportunity to work its way into the brain after it works past the nasal mucus. It happens rarely, but 97% of people whose brains start swelling because of this amoeba end up dying. Like most microorganisms, N. fowleri can be neutralized with concentrated chlorine. However, the systems we use to deliver tap water aren't so clean. Researchers found that N. fowleri can easily survive for 24 hours when it's mixed with the types of biofilm that tend to reside in water pipes. Increasing chlorine levels isn't a good option, since its reaction with these biofilms can generate carcinogens.
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Submission + - Municipal ISP Makes 10Gbps Available to All Residents->

An anonymous reader writes: Five years ago, the city of Salisbury, North Carolina began a project to roll out fiber across its territory. They decided to do so because the private ISPs in the area weren't willing to invest more in the local infrastructure. Now, Salisbury has announced that it's ready to make 10 Gbps internet available to all of the city's residents. While they don't expect many homeowners to have a use for the $400/month 10 Gbps plan, they expect to have some business customers. Normal residents can get 50 Mbps upstream and downstream for $45/month. A similar service was rolled out for a rural section of Vermont in June. Hopefully these cities will serve as blueprints for other locations that aren't able to get a decent fiber system from private ISPs.
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Submission + - The Publisher Side: 5 Real Time Bidding Insider Secrets for 2016->

yayabobi writes: Real-Time Bidding or RTB is becoming a more dominate method to purchase ad space. Despite RTB and programmatic buying still having a few hurdles that they need to clear this method of advertising is quickly taking over online media buying. In order to be ready for the future, you need to start asking yourself is Real-Time buying is right for me?
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Submission + - Slowing Wind Energy Production Suffers From Lack of Wind

HughPickens.com writes: Gregory Meyer reports at CNBC that electricity generated by US wind farms fell 6 per cent in the first half of the year even as the nation expanded wind generation capacity by 9 per cent. The reason was some of the softest air currents in 40 years, cutting power sales from wind farms to utilities and the situation is likely to intensify into the first quarter of 2016 as the El Niño weather phenomenon holds back wind speeds around much of the US. "We never anticipated a drop-off in the wind resource as we have witnessed over the past six months," says David Crane. Wind generated 4.4 per cent of US electricity last year, up from 0.4 per cent a decade earlier. But this year US wind plants' "capacity factor" has averaged just a third of their total generating capacity, down from 38 per cent in 2014. EIA noted that slightly slower wind speeds can reduce output by a disproportionately large amount. "Capacity factors for wind turbines are largely determined by wind resources," says a report from the Energy Information Administration. "Because the output from a turbine varies nonlinearly with wind speed, small decreases in wind speeds can result in much larger changes in output and, in turn, capacity factors." In January of 2015, wind speeds remained 20 to 45 percent below normal on areas of the west coast, but it was especially bad in California, Oregon, and Washington, where those levels dropped to 50 percent below normal during the month of January.

Some also speculate the the increase in the number of wind farms may be having an effect. Since wind turbines extract kinetic energy from the air around them, and since less energy makes for weaker winds, turbines make it less windy. Technically speaking, the climate zone right behind a turbine (or behind all the turbines on a wind farm) experiences what's called a "wind speed vacuum," or a "momentum deficit." In other words, the air slows down and upwind turbines in a densely packed farm may weaken the breeze before it reaches the downwind ones. A study in 2013 also found that large wind farms could be expected to influence local and regional atmospheric circulations. "If wind farms were constructed on a truly massive scale," adds Daniel Engbar, "their cumulative momentum deficit could conceivably alter wind speeds on a global scale."

Submission + - Create Fascinating and Enchanting Pre-Sells ->

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