Submission + - The one number that's eerily good at predicting your success in love (

schwit1 writes: A new working paper from the Federal Reserve Board that looks at what role credit scores play in committed relationships suggests that daters might want to start using the metric as well. The researchers found that credit scores — or whatever personal qualities credit scores might represent — actually play a pretty big role in whether people form and stay in committed relationships. People with higher credit scores are more likely to form committed relationships and marriages and then stay in them. In addition, how well matched the couple's credit scores are initially is a good predictor of whether they stay together in the long term.

Submission + - Did DHS Edit The Wikipedia Page Of Kevin McCarthy (

schwit1 writes: An IP address originating from the Department of Homeland Security was tied to entries made on the Wikipedia pages of North Carolina Rep. Renee Ellmers and California Rep. Kevin McCarthy, alleging that the two Republicans were having an affair. McCarthy dropped his bid to be the next Speaker of the House earlier today.

It is unclear if someone at the federal agency actually was behind the edits. But both changes — McCarthy's and Ellmers' — show that a user at the IP address,, made them on Thursday. That address comes from DHS' offices in Springfield, Va.

Submission + - Netflix Hikes Streaming Plan Pricing To Bring New Content

An anonymous reader writes: Netflix has confirmed its raising its monthly fee for streaming from $9 bucks a month to $10 per month. The new price change will only affect new customers, at least for now. Existing customers will continue to pay what they pay today, until October 2016 at least. The $10 per month streaming plan gives users two simultaneous HD streams, their $12 per month allows 4 simultaneous streams and also access to Netflix's Ultra-HD content. For those not needing HD, they will still offer the $8 per month non-HD plan.

Submission + - Mozilla sets out its proposed principles for content blocking (

Mark Wilson writes: With Apple embracing ad blocking and the likes of AdBlock Plus proving more popular than ever, content blocking is making the headlines at the moment. There are many sides to the debate about blocking ads — revenue for sites, privacy concerns for visitors, speeding up page loads times (Google even allows for the display of ads with its AMP Project), and so on — but there are no signs that it is going to go away.

Getting in on the action, Mozilla has set out what it believes are some reasonable principles for content blocking that will benefit everyone involved. Three cornerstones have been devised with a view to ensuring that content providers and content consumers get a fair deal, and you can help to shape how they develop.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Knowledge Management Systems

Tom writes: Is there an enterprise level equivalent of Semantic MediaWiki, a Knowledge Management System that can store meaningful facts and allows queries on it? I'm involved in a pretty large IT project and would like to have the documentation in something better than Word. In a structured format that can be queried, without knowing all the questions that will be asked in the future. I looked extensively, and while there are some graphing or network layout tools that understand predicates, they don't come with a query language. SMW has both semantic links and queries, but as a wiki is very free-form and it's not exactly an Enterprise product (I don't see many chances to convince a government to use it). Is there such a thing?

Submission + - Verizon Wireless to Upcharge Grandfathered Unlimited Data Users $20 (

nicholasjay writes: In November Verizon Wireless is going to start charging its customers with the grandfathered 'unlimited data' plans an extra $20 for the data. This is obviously an attempt to get people off of the old unlimited data plans. I'm hoping they won't go through with this plan, but right now I'm weighing all my options.

Submission + - Third recorded global coral bleaching event is underway (

dywolf writes: NOAA is reporting that, for the third time since records began being kept, a global coral bleaching event is underway. "When coral bleaching spanning 100 kilometers or more is found in the Pacific, Atlantic and Indian ocean basins, it's designated a global coral bleaching event." Such bleaching is caused by stress from higher ocean temperatures. While so far all three events occurred during El Nino years, at some point the continual warming of the oceans won't require the exceptional warmth of an El Nino to trigger a bleaching.

Submission + - Disclosed Netgear Flaws Under Attack (

msm1267 writes: A vulnerability in Netgear routers, already disclosed by two sets of researchers at different security companies, has been publicly exploited.

Netgear, meanwhile, has yet to release patched firmware, despite apparently having built one and confirmed with one of the companies that privately disclosed that it addressed the problem adequately.

The vulnerability is a remotely exploitable authentication bypass that affects Netgear router firmware N300_1.1.0.31_1.0.1.img, and N300- The flaw allows an attacker, without knowing the router password, to access the administration interface.

Submission + - Mars once hosted lakes, flowing water (

sciencehabit writes: Last week, NASA announced they’d spotted occasional signs of flowing water on Mars. These briny flows, discerned from orbit, originated on the steep slopes of valleys or craters at four widely scattered sites in the planet’s southern hemisphere. Now, a comprehensive analysis of images gathered by NASA’s Curiosity rover provides the strongest evidence yet that Mars once was warm and wet enough to have lakes and flowing water year-round and for extended periods of time—possibly for millions of years. The findings hint that the Red Planet once had a climate hospitable enough for microbial life to develop and evolve.

Submission + - Get Your Internet Out of My Things (

szczys writes: The Internet of Things is painfully and woefully insecure. In a perfect world where people respected each other and no one has a penchant for mayhem it wouldn't matter. But when you start to think about security chasing hardware and consider it from the Neckbeard and Father-in-Law point of views it becomes an unsolvable issue. It's not just the fact that we're designing fundamentally insecure devices, but also a failure in how we go about telling each other to lock our devices down. One bad device on your side of the network can be the hole that sinks the whole boat, and that little hangup is what will scuttle IoT adoption.

Submission + - In Midst of a Tech Boom, Seattle Tries to Keep Its Soul writes: Nick Wingfield has an interesting article in the NYT about how Seattle, Austin, Boulder, Portland, and other tech hubs around the country are seeking not to emulate San Francisco where wealth has created a widely envied economy, but housing costs have skyrocketed, and the region’s economic divisions have deepened with rent for a one-bedroom apartment in San Francisco at more than $3,500 a month, the highest in the country. “Seattle has wanted to be San Francisco for so long,” says Knute Berger. “Now it’s figuring out maybe that it isn’t what we want to be.” The core of the debate is over affordable housing and the worry that San Francisco is losing artists, teachers and its once-vibrant counterculture. “It’s not that we don’t want to be a thriving tech center — we do,” says Alan Durning. “It’s that the San Francisco and Silicon Valley communities have gotten themselves into a trap where preservationists and local politics have basically guaranteed buying a house will cost at least $1 million. Already in Seattle, it costs half-a-million, so we’re well on our way.”

Seattle mayor Ed Murray says he wants to keep the working-class roots of Seattle, a city with a major port, fishing fleet and even a steel mill. After taking office last year, Murray made the minimum-wage increase a priority, reassured representatives of the city’s manufacturing and maritime industries that Seattle needed them., and has set a goal of creating 50,000 homes — 40 percent of them affordable for low-income residents — over the next decade. “We can hopefully create enough affordable housing so we don’t find ourselves as skewed by who lives in the city as San Francisco is,” says Murray. “We’re at a crossroads,” says Roger Valdez. “One path leads to San Francisco, where you have an incredibly regulated and stagnant housing economy that can’t keep up with demand. The other path is something different, the Seattle way.”

Submission + - Reconstruction and simulation of rat neocortical microcircuit (

physick writes: The Blue Brain project at EPFL, Switzerland today published the results of more than 10 years work in reconstructing a cellular model of a piece of the somatosensory cortex of a juvenile rat. The paper in Cell ( describes the process of painstakingly assembling tens of thousands of digital neurons, establishing the location of their synapses, and simulating the resulting neocortical microcircuit on an IBM Blue Gene supercomputer.

Submission + - bring your own device nightmare 1

HongoBelando writes: The company I contract for is pushing on to me a new "bring your own device" policy. It would not be bad if the mandatory requirements IMHO are braindamaged and push to a complete Windows environment. Windows 7 or 8 64bit, Pointesec or Bitlocker, Symantec or other similar stuff. IOS and Linux are not permitted, xBSD are not even mentioned. Some lines even mention TPM (yuck).

Until now I could happily use my dual boot Debian and FreeBSD that suites my job perfectly.

My only idea at the moment is to try installing a VirtualBox W7 client and hope one of the permitted disk encrypters works. I really would want to avoid repartitioning just to meet idiotic requirements of some bean counter. All ideas appreciated!

Submission + - Elephants don't get cancer. Here's why (

sciencehabit writes: The surprisingly low cancer rates in elephants and other hefty, long-lived animals such as whales—known as Peto’s paradox after one of the scientists who first described it—have nettled scientists since the mid-1970s. So far, researchers have made little progress in solving the mystery or determining how other long-lived species beat cancer. Now, a new study shows that the animals harbor dozens of extra copies of one of the most powerful cancer-preventing genes, p53. These bonus genes might enable elephants to weed out potentially cancerous cells before they can grow into tumors. The researchers say they are now trying to determine whether they can make human cells more elephantlike, for example by inserting additional copies of the p53 gene or by identifying compounds that duplicate the effects of the extra copies.

Submission + - How to Create Art With Mathematics (

An anonymous reader writes: Lavished with many beautiful illustrations of this kind, Farris’ book is a joyful yet serious exploration of how mathematics can create beautiful patterns and provide us with a deep understanding of symmetry, one of the underlying principles of great art. “Euclid alone has looked on Beauty bare,” wrote the poet Edna St. Vincent Millay, and Frank Farris shows us what that means. His book uses the abstract, esoteric beauty of mathematical equations to create the universally appealing beauty of visual art. I believe our ability to find beauty in both mathematics and art reveals something deep about the human mind, a topic we may explore in the solution column. For now, let’s tackle today’s puzzles. They are inspired by the more elementary parts of Farris’ book, which discusses different types of symmetries in wallpaper, friezes and Escher-esque morphing patterns using a host of mathematical techniques involving groups, vector spaces, Fourier series, rosette functions, wave functions and several others. The puzzles below merely skim the surface of the connection between math and art that the book explores in depth, but they are designed to encourage all of our readers to create stunning visual patterns using mathematics.

Submission + - Google Lunar XPrize Israeli team SpaceIL gets confirmed launch contract (

MarkWhittington writes: Thus far, only three countries have landed payloads on the moon, the United States, the Soviet Union, and China. Now, according to an announcement by the Google Lunar X Prize, an unlikely fourth country, the state of Israel, may well be the fourth. Team SpaceIL, the Israeli team that is pursuing the prize for the first private group to land on the moon, is the first competitor to be officially certified as having a launch contract. Other teams, such as Moon Express, have announced launch contracts, but have yet to have them confirmed.