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Comment Re:House loses most staunch Democrat (Score 1) 406

1-PP's funding comes under an older program meant to provide funds for medical care for low income people, particularly women, which is exactly what PP provides.

2-The state of Oklahoma alone provides more than 500 million in subsidies and tax breaks to oil per year. We even had a budget shortfall this year, of 500 million...purely by coincidence.... When totaled up across all 50 states it except 14 billion a year, and that doesn't include federal give aways to the industry.

3- Medicare/Medicaid are well known as being the single most effective and efficient sectors of the health care industry in this country. (not a debatle statement; economists and industry experts across the spectrum of the debate all agree and acknowledge that fact). While their costs are still higher than most every other peer country of ours, that effect is largely from the market distortion from the other half of the industry (private sector) that overpays by even larger amounts. This is best shown in the datum that in the US care costs ~200% more than other countries, but when separate into public vs private costs, Medicare/Medicaid is only ~50% above average compoarble nations, while private costs are more than 400% above that average. in short: it works quite well,a nd you don't know what the F you're talking about (as usual)

4- The "highway bill" as you so ignorantly name it, is a bandaid, every year it comes up. the HTF is supposed to be funded via the federal gas tax. However it is one of the first places raided for the budget every year, with IOU's put in its place. Every year when it's about to run dry they do another stopgap injection of cash into it, or some other budgetary trick to keep it solvent. It's not a sustainable system.

And no its not one of the largest government programs (again: pure ignorance on your part, as usual).

And this last time it came up, they 'funded' it by essentially taking out a loan from private industry, to the government. A loan to be paid back, with interest. They are effectively directly funding private profits with tax dollars, even more blatantly than usual, when the fiscally and governmentally responsible thing to do would be to increase the gas tax to match the inflation since the last time it was raised, and then link the sucker to the economy, so it never comes up again and permanently end the cycle where the HTF gets more and more underfunded the longer time goes on.

Comment Re:What about the rights of those injured by firea (Score 1) 1148

oh, and its not about mental illness, not solely, and not largely.
makes a convenient excuse though.


We do have statistics showing that the vast majority of people who commit acts of violence do not have a diagnosis of mental illness and, conversely, people who have mental illness are far more likely to be the victims of violence than the perpetrators.

We know that the stigma of people who suffer from mental illness as scary, dangerous potential murderers hurts people every single day — it costs people relationships and jobs, it scares people away from seeking help who need it, it brings shame and fear down on the heads of people who already have it bad enough.

But the media insists on trotting out “mental illness” and blaring out that phrase nonstop in the wake of any mass killing. I had to grit my teeth every time I personally debated someone defaulting to the mindless mantra of “The real issue is mental illness” over the Isla Vista shootings.

“The real issue is mental illness” is a goddamn cop-out. I almost never hear it from actual mental health professionals, or advocates working in the mental health sphere, or anyone who actually has any kind of informed opinion on mental health or serious policy proposals for how to improve our treatment of the mentally ill in this country.

What I hear from people who bleat on about “The real issue is mental illness,” when pressed for specific suggestions on how to deal with said “real issue,” is terrifying nonsense designed to throw the mentally ill under the bus. Elliot Rodger’s parents should’ve been able to force risperidone down his throat. Seung-Hui Cho should’ve been forcibly institutionalized. Anyone with a mental illness diagnosis should surrender all of their constitutional rights, right now, rather than at all compromise the right to bear arms of self-declared sane people.

What’s interesting is to watch who the mentally ill people are being thrown under the bus to defend. In the wake of Sandy Hook, the NRA tells us that creating a national registry of firearms owners would be giving the government dangerously unchecked tyrannical power, but a national registry of the mentally ill would not — even though a “sane” person holding a gun is intrinsically more dangerous than a “crazy” person, no matter how crazy, without a gun.


And the big splashy headliner atrocities tend to distract us from the ones that don’t make headline news. People are willing to call one white man emptying five magazines and murdering nine black people in a church and openly saying it was because of race a hate crime, even if they have to then cover it up with the fig leaf of individual “mental illness”–but a white man wearing a uniform who fires two magazines at two people in a car in a “bad neighborhood” in Cleveland? That just ends up a statistic in a DoJ report on systemic bias.

And hundreds of years of history in which an entire country’s economy was set up around chaining up millions of black people, forcing them to work and shooting them if they get out of line? That’s just history.

The reason a certain kind of person loves talking about “mental illness” is to draw attention to the big bold scary exceptional crimes and treat them as exceptions. It’s to distract from the fact that the worst crimes in history were committed by people just doing their jobs–cops enforcing the law, soldiers following orders, bureaucrats signing paperwork. That if we define “sanity” as going along to get along with what’s “normal” in the society around you, then for most of history the sane thing has been to aid and abet monstrous evil.

We love to talk about individuals’ mental illness so we can avoid talking about the biggest, scariest problem of all–societal illness. That the danger isn’t any one person’s madness, but that the world we live in is mad.

Comment Re:What about the rights of those injured by firea (Score 1) 1148

What part of "the founders aren't perfect and gave us a document we can change (and have) for a reason" is so hard to understand?

Times change.
Society changes.
The constitution can too when we decide some particular aspect of it needs attention.

In the 93 weeks since Sandy Hook, this is school/campus shooting #142.
We're batting an average of 1.5 per week.

I'm willing to have another look at the 2nd Amendment and throw the bird to the gun nuts (and i like guns), and so are a growing number of people, as that statistic gets added to with each stupid, preventable, predictable incident every 4.6 days.

Comment Re:What about the rights of those injured by firea (Score 1) 1148

so if there's a gun for every man woman and child in this country, why is our gun fatality rate more than 4x higher than any other western nation?
why arent we the safest nation on earth?

In the 93 weeks since Sandy Hook, this is school/campus shooting #142.
We're batting an average of 1.5 per week.
Literally no other advanced nation in the world has such a fucked up statistic.

Comment Re:Gun-free zone? (Score 5, Insightful) 1148

again with the gun free zone myth.

again with the reminder that almost no place is actually chosen on that basis, but rather that almost all targets/locations are chosen on the basis of a personal connection between the shooter and the location or someone at that location (workplace/school, boss/collegue, ex-spouse/boyfriend/girlfriend/etc).

again, you wont care because facts aren't something youre interested in

Comment Re:Barf (Score 1) 444

Not insightful.
Not the least bit.

She can't be there to mentor her kids' homework because she had to pick up an extra shift tonight to make rent thats due tomorrow.
An extra shift she's lucky to get because she normally isn't schedule more than 30 hours in a week.
she cant get a second job because she never knows her schedule more than 4 days in advance.
That 8.25/hr has to stretch over rent, food, utilities, clothes, and daycare, but she manages most months thanks to food stamps and WIC.

Father? He can't be there because hes in jail on some minor possession charge, part of the 1.5 MILLION missing black males, mostly locked in jail or dead, a number which explains why 1 in 4 black males will go to jail in his lifetime (compared to only 1 in 24 white males), and why blacks make up half the prison population even though they're only ~15% of the total population. though that threat of jail is likely better than the other prospect of being shot during an encounter with police, encounters that happen more frequently for black males than for any other group, and something which they face 31 : 1million chance of people shot/killed (odds for white males: 1.5 : 1million, 22 times lower). coincidentally these two factors explain the high numbers of 'single' mothers, and bemoaned lack of father figure role models, in minority communities.

These economic, social, and racial factors (and I barely scratched the surface) are everyday reality for millions of black Americans.
These are the institutionalized racism you claim doesn't exist. I assure you, it very much does.
And educational outcomes are one of the results, and another of the factors, in this self perpetuating cycle.

Comment Re:Bias? Or reality? (Score 1) 444

and we have more poor people now than we did then (percentage wise).

actually, no.
no we don't.
as usual, you're wrong and full of BS.

it has to to with liberal policies that have destroyed the family, and disenfranchised women into being single parents, and children raised by other wolf cubs rather than by successful people mentoring them

actually the thing that has destroyed families and led to a growth in single motherhood is the mass incarceration of predominantly minorities, particularly black males. which coincidentally also leads to a lack of mentors...because you know...the whole being in jail thing.

care to try again?
this time from a reference point based somewhere in reality?

Be careful when a loop exits to the same place from side and bottom.