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I am, at present, from the place of my birth ...

Displaying poll results.
< 1% of the circumference of Earth
  10699 votes / 54%
1 to 3% of the circumference of Earth
  2498 votes / 12%
4 to 10% of the circumference of Earth
  2332 votes / 11%
11 to 25% of the circumference of Earth
  1404 votes / 7%
26 to 50% of the circumference of Earth
  2197 votes / 11%
(Constantly changing, from my ISS berth)
  424 votes / 2%
19554 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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I am, at present, from the place of my birth ...

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  • Circumference (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 24, 2011 @07:21AM (#38480768)

    Circumference of Earth = 24,901.47 miles or 40,075.04km

    So if you're within 1%, you're within 249 miles or 407.5km. That likely covers most of the native population of the UK who still live there.

    • by jonbryce (703250)

      If you have moved from Scotland to the South of England, you are probably just over 1%.

    • Re:Circumference (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Rising Ape (1620461) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @08:41PM (#38490884)

      Something I was wondering, not being an American - obviously, the USA is much larger than the UK (where I'm from), but does that mean it's also typical for people to move much larger distances from home, or do people tend to stay roughly in the same area?

      I'm about 250 miles away from my place of birth normally, but most of the people I know are much closer to home. Well, apart from the three who moved to North America. My family pretty much stayed within a ~ 10 mile radius. Is this typical for the USA too?

      • Re:Circumference (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Pharmboy (216950) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @09:53PM (#38491160) Journal

        My family pretty much stayed within a ~ 10 mile radius. Is this typical for the USA too?

        Yes and no, but let me stretch that to a 50 mile radius. For people with a limited education (high school or less), absolutely yes. For people with moderate education (tech training), it is fairly common. For people with higher education, it is just as common to be half a country away. This is due to opportunities being more available to those with more education, but may be on a different coast, up to 3000 miles away. I was raised mainly in Texas, but live in North Carolina, about 1100 miles away. It is pretty easy to move 1000 miles away from home here.

        I would also add that a lot of people enter the military in the US, and those people are most likely to be stationed away from their home, and when they get out, odds are good they won't go back to their birthplace, being more used to living away. This is most true for those who stay more than a few years in the military.

        The reason I stretched that to a 50 mile radius is that I know many, many people who live in the same general area where they were born. My wife is around 50 miles from her birthplace, for instance. Many live in a suburb of their birthplace, and may be 20 miles away but still have the same friends and family stucture. Or they either moving from a small town to the nearest city (100k), or vise versa. We Americans aren't afraid to drive long distances regularly, considering we are a less urbanized country and gas is about 1/3rd to 1/2 the price it is in Europe.

        • by xaxa (988988)

          A 50-mile radius is a big circle, on England.

          Look at the map: http://maps.google.co.uk/ [google.co.uk]
          Your circle could cover London, Birmingham, Leicester, Coventry, Oxford, Cambridge.
          Or it could cover Liverpool, Manchester, Nottingham, Leeds, Sheffield.
          At a rough estimate, between 20 and 30 million people live in those two circles! (51 million people in England.)

          A 50-mile diameter seems more useful.

          For people with higher education, it is just as common to be half a country away.

          I think this is where the difference starts. It's still "half a country", but my country is tiny, relative to yours.

  • by rvw (755107) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @07:22AM (#38480770)

    The circumference of the earth is 40.000 km. I live about 200 km from my place of birth. That is 0.5% of the circumference, but I think it would be wiser to use half of that, so 20.000 km, because that would be the maximum distance in a straight line. Then it's 1%.

    • by azalin (67640)
      At least this time they fixed the units before reusing a poll
    • by eggstasy (458692)

      I guess in that case most people in Europe would have to learn a new language to move a significant percentage away from their place of birth.

      • by koxkoxkox (879667) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @12:49PM (#38482594)

        As if French and Spanish were only spoken in France and Spain.

      • by jonbryce (703250) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @02:02PM (#38483198) Homepage

        If you live in the UK or Ireland, you could go to Canada, Australia, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe or quite a few other countries and still speak the same language. You could also go to the USA where the language is close enough to English to be mutually intelligible most of the time. People in Portugal could go to Brazil. People in Spain could go to most of the Latin American Countries. People in France could go to Quebec, Canada, or a few other countries.

        • by Sponge Bath (413667) on Sunday December 25, 2011 @01:20PM (#38488676)

          People in France could go to Quebec, Canada, or a few other countries.

          There'z no Canada like French Canada, it'z za bezt Canada in ze land.
          Ze ozer Canada is hardly Canada. If you lived here for a day, you'd understand.

        • People in France could go to Quebec, Canada, or a few other countries.

          The French spoken in Quebec is different from the French spoken in France. The language stagnated in Quebec while it evolved in France. It would be the equivalent of someone living in the US today trying to have a conversation with William Shakespeare.

          Also, the France French don't like the Quebec French.

      • by arth1 (260657) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @06:25PM (#38484998) Homepage Journal

        I guess in that case most people in Europe would have to learn a new language to move a significant percentage away from their place of birth.

        I am pretty sure that most Europeans know at least two languages, and quite often three. I know we had to be fluent in two and able to converse in one more language before leaving junior high school.
        Unfortunately, the same can not be said for all the possible places to move to, but these days, you can expect to survive with one of your languages (most likely English or Spanish) until you learn the native language.

        Culture is a far bigger problem. I moved from a western European country to USA twelve years ago, and I'm still not assimilated or even comfortable with the differences, and don't think I ever will be. Culture (or, in this case, lack thereof) is a real stumbling block. But you don't think about that when you move.

        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by WalksOnDirt (704461)

          Culture (or, in this case, lack thereof) is a real stumbling block.

          Cheer up, culture can be learned. Twelve years just isn't enough time for you.

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by Sponge Bath (413667)

          I moved from a western European country to USA twelve years ago, and I'm still not assimilated or even comfortable with the differences, and don't think I ever will be. Culture (or, in this case, lack thereof) is a real stumbling block.

          I'm have no problem with your dislike of US culture, but that *is* your choice. It's pointless to moan about the US not conforming to your definition of culture.

        • by orzetto (545509)

          I am pretty sure that most Europeans know at least two languages, and quite often three.

          As a European who lived for significant amounts of time (several years) in Italy, Germany and Norway, this depends a lot on the size of the country. Germans, Frenchmen and Italians do not need a foreign language since their entire lives can go on just fine with their mother language only: dubbed TV series, translated manuals for electronic gizmos, this stuff. Same goes for Japanese and Chinese. And Americans. They all ha

    • by jonbryce (703250)

      Given that the options only go up to 50%, meaning exactly the opposite side of the earth from your birthplace, I don't think you are supposed to divide by 2.

    • by bidule (173941)

      20.000 km, because that would be the maximum distance in a straight line.

      Actually it's almost 13.000 km, but that's a long dig. I like my space euclidian, tyvm.

    • by rtb61 (674572)

      Being a true geek, immediately distance from place of birth brings to mind 'spatial reference' or earth relative http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JWVshkVF0SY [youtube.com], merry Christmas and happy holidays.

  • If you can tunnel through the earth, the farthest away you could ever be is equal to the diameter of the earth. So, (making a simplifying assumption of a spherical shape) the maximum percentage is (D)/(pi * D) or 1 / pi or around 31.8%. Calculating the exact number for any two given points involves a little more math than I care to take on at this early hour, but probably would involve converting latitude/longitude values into cartesian coordinates, and then using the old ((delta X)^2 + (delta Y)^2 + (del
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward
      I think "circumference" is the clue, here...
  • I'm approx 3.4% from my place of birth. Given the choices, that puts me between two choices but by a significant margin I chose to round down though. Regardless, maybe in a few years I will fall pleasantly in the 4%-10% range.
  • ...to the town where I grew up. Several times a week, I drive past the hospital where I was born.

  • I didn't even have to do the math, because the hospital where I was born is just down the street from my house. While this sounds pathetically mom's-basement-y (and it probably is), it's not quite as bad as it sounds. I've lived farther away from my birthplace than I do now, including about half a year (cumulatative) across the Atlantic from here. I just happen to like the area where I grew up.

    • by green1 (322787)

      I'm in the same city where I was born, and this city has been my home continually. But perhaps another interesting poll would be what's the farthest distance you have ever visited from where you were born... Though I have to admit, for myself it would still be within the same country... when we drove east, over five thousand kilometers each way... (runner up was a different trip where we drove a north, four thousand kilometers each way) And I frequently take a one thousand kilometer each way drive west.

  • by eggstasy (458692) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @10:09AM (#38481420) Journal

    Welcome to Olde Europe ;)
    My great-great-grandfather moved to Lisbon from his little village somewhere in the 19th century, and most of us haven't moved out of the neighborhood. Lots of relatives here. We still own the original stone house back in the little village, its origins lost in time.
    We've traced our genealogy all the way back to the 1600s when the church started recording baptisms, we were still there then, and plenty of relatives never moved out of it either :)

  • Guide (Score:3, Informative)

    by neo12 (1892318) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @10:27AM (#38481546)

    1. open maps.google.com
    2. key in your place of birth and current location.
    3. google circumference of earth.
    4. look for a calculator / calculator app (yawn)
    5. key in those figures (hard to keep my eyes open)
    6. choose the option and slump on the laptop.

    • Re:Guide (Score:5, Informative)

      by SpinyNorman (33776) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @12:26PM (#38482392)

      You may as well use Google as your calculator (you do know it evaluates expressions and conversions?), or simpler yet go to http://www.wolframalpha.com/ [wolframalpha.com] and ask it to calculate:

      "distance from new york to london / circumerfence of earth"

      Answer: 0.1394 (13.94%)

    • or, in one step:
      1 WolframAlpha (distance from A to B / earth's circumference)

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      Or just know off hand that the earth is around 25000 miles in circumference. Are you less than 250 miles from where you were born? More than that but less than 1000? More than a thousand but less than 2500? More than 2500 but less than 6000? More than 6000?

      You don't need to be super accurate here. Unless you have no sense of distances, it really shouldn't be hard. And if you do have no sense of distances, you probably are within 250 miles of home.

    • by Mitreya (579078)
      1. open maps.google.com
      2. key in your place of birth and current location.

      Ok, I did that. Google maps refuses to calculate directions from Ukraine to New England. Now what? Some of us have moved far.
      Is there a way get the distance without directions?

    • by IrquiM (471313)
      0.00000875% of the circumference.... and that's not even in a straight line, that's using the walking directions on google maps...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday December 24, 2011 @11:30AM (#38481974)

    Take your pick:
    I don't know where I am, YIC...
    I don't know where I was born, YIC...
    I don't know what the circumference of the Earth is, YIC...
    I don't know what circumference means, YIC...
    I wasn't born, I was a C-section, YIC...
    I wasn't born, I was created in a lab, YIC...
    We aren't born, we're grown, YIC...
    Individual Birth is Irrelevant. Resistance is futile. We are Slashdot. You will be assimilated. YIC...
    I was hatched, not born, YIC...
    I budded binomial fission style from my mother/sister/host, YIC...
    I am a 3rd generation modified Lucien Genetic Upgrade Clone, YIC...
    I was born again, and so have more than one distance figure applicable to me, YIC...
    Euclidean geometry does not apply to my extradimensional existence, YIC...
    So take your pick, you insensitive clod...

  • I just can't get far enough away!

  • and the poll options aren't completely broken. (Ahem [slashdot.org].)
  • that's about 7200Km away. The earth's circumference is roughtly 40000Km. So that's about 18%.

    I am surprised, there are so many 1%, since roughtly being in an other city than were you were born, gives more than 1% (even in a small country like France). But I guess christmas season skews the data.

  • Wolfram Alpha, which I polled via the zero-click info of Duck Duck Go [duckduckgo.com] (a smarter, privacy-aware, non-ad-supported competitor to Google), reports the circumference of the Earth as 24901.47 miles [wolframalpha.com]. It can also compute your distance, e.g. from San Francisco to NYC, which is 2577 miles [wolframalpha.com]. Now just divide the distance by the circumference and multiply by a hundred for percent and you'll get (for this example) 10.3%.
  • For all of the supposed world travelers on here, over 50% have the smallest option. Not that I consider my 4.5% (covering most of the way across the US, the short way) to be all that impressive. For all the supposed glamour of it, very few people spend much time more than a few hundred miles from where they were born.

    • by artor3 (1344997) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @03:11PM (#38483738)

      It's Christmas Eve. Figure it out.

    • by Matheus (586080)

      I'm mostly curious about how many 1%'ers are actually farther than that. I don't consider myself to be that far away from my birth place BUT when I did the math I was just over 1% which kind of surprised me.

      As for your surprise, there are some factors you're forgetting about... here's a few types of people on /. who would be *more likely to stay within 1% than their peers:
      1) 'been in a MUD since '83... can't... leave... keyboard...
      2) The world is available at my fingertips via the internet, why would I eve

    • by green1 (322787)

      People who travel the world don't always live elsewhere, many people like where they grew up. And the poll asks where you are now, not where you have visited (though that might be another interesting poll)
      Personally I'm less than 1% (same city, same quadrant of the city) But I have visited over 10% away (of course that was still in the same country...) My two longest road trips were over 5000km each way (driving east), and over 3000km each way(driving north). My next trip will actually get me out of the cou

    • by AK Marc (707885)
      Well traveled doesn't mean moved far. I'm at 30%, but I'm an exception. I was more surprised how well traveled Slashdot is. I'd guess 90% of Americans would be #1, and the rest would be #2 (except for those in the military).
    • by Xtifr (1323)

      over 50% have the smallest option

      You mean over 25%? (Over 50% ends up being less than 50% the other direction.) In any case, as I sit here typing, the smallest category is 11-25% (which happens to be the category I'm in, albeit barely). Over 25% has nearly half-again as many votes.

      And, given your confusion about 50% vs 25%, are you sure about that 4.5% number of yours? That seems awfully small for "most of the way across the US", unless you meant N-S. (Which seems odd to describe as "across", somehow.)

      • by Pontiac (135778)

        As I see it I have 2 ways to get home.. the 1,000 mile route or the 24,000 mile route going the other way..
        So I can have a 96% option for getting home..

        • by Xtifr (1323)

          you forgot about the 2.3e6% route the other way around the sun! :)

          (A straight-line path according to Einstein.)

  • Far more than 50% (Score:5, Informative)

    by BlueScreenO'Life (1813666) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @02:41PM (#38483528)
    Considering the galaxy is constantly moving.
  • Why are we talking about the circumference when you can't be any more than one diameter away from any other point on Earth? It's not as if the poll is actually asking you to drill the tunnel, it just wants its length.

    • I think the question is intended to ask for arc shaped distances, because that's how we can optimally travel from place to place (albeit wending our way in a curvy fashion not feasible to account for in this poll). But as soon as I say that, it occurs to me that an equally interesting poll could ask for the distance or travel time from Google Maps, which is happy to include swimming across the Atlantic, etc.

      I'm clarifying all this to you because this is a really important matter that it's worth spending a
  • I live 1% from where I was born, in another country.

  • by Hartree (191324) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @04:38PM (#38484344)

    I'm typing this in the same bedroom that I had as a child.

    I'm single, and almost 50.

    I could be the perfect slashdotter, save that I'm employed and the basement floods in heavy rain.

  • At christmas time? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by ZigMonty (524212) <slashdot@zigm[ ] ... m ['ont' in gap]> on Saturday December 24, 2011 @04:47PM (#38484398)
    Seriously, this is the worst time for this poll. I normally live 2.5% away, but because it's christmas, i'm currently like 1 km from where i was born.
    • by Cimexus (1355033)

      I think that's the point of the poll - to capture where people end up on Christmas.

      I too am not in my usual position, but my situation is the opposite of yours. I'm 'normally' about 250 km from my place of birth (~0.6% earth's circumference), but right now am 14,885 km from my place of birth (37% of earth's circumference), due to Christmas travels.

      • by rossdee (243626)

        However I think that the majority of the people who live more than 25% of the circumference of the earth away from their birthplace don't go 'home' for Christmas due to the cost and time involved in the travel.

        I now live about 1/3 the c-of-e away from where I was born and the furtherest I have been since I moved here was less than 1%

    • by w3woody (44457)
      On vacation on the other side of the country visiting my in-laws, thus around 10.5% of the circumference of the Earth from where I was born. My wife? 1%...
    • Could be interesting to compare it to the previous poll "Distance from birthplace? ". http://slashdot.org/pollBooth.pl?qid=1260&aid=-1 [slashdot.org]

  • by 93 Escort Wagon (326346) on Saturday December 24, 2011 @04:51PM (#38484430)

    I was born in eastern North Carolina, and now live in western Washington State, which works out to around 11% or so.

    I guess this is a fairly big country - it's surprising you don't hear more about us on the news! Instead it's always "Canada this" and "Canada that"... guess we just picked the wrong neighbors.

  • Anybody using that option for some other reason? Posting from a plane or something?

  • 11.2 km by road. Maybe eight km great circle.

  • My grandfather used to say: “Life is astonishingly short. Now, in my memory, it is so compressed that I can hardly understand, for example, how a young person can decide to ride to the next village without being afraid that—apart from accidents—even the time allotted to a normal, happy life is far too short for such a journey.”

  • Born in Western Pennsylvania, currently in Japan. Been here for over 7 years now.
  • When the bastards outsourced me and my mates that's what I did.

  • Boy, it's crowded up there...

When Dexter's on the Internet, can Hell be far behind?"

 



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