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Comment: Re:I hate fear mongering... (Score 1) 168

by AK Marc (#49795487) Attached to: Why Detecting Drones Is a Tough Gig
I don't think that would work. After 9/11, the coverage showed unbroken windows removed from the rubble at the pentagon. The windows were designed to withstand a hit from any man-portable weapon system. This included the most powerful sniper weapons, as well as RPGs. I'm assuming the White House is no worse than the pentagon, but I didn't build either.

Comment: Re:I hate fear mongering... (Score 1) 168

by AK Marc (#49795027) Attached to: Why Detecting Drones Is a Tough Gig
So we shouldn't place control on non-LOS 50+ lb drones because there exist 2 lb LOS-only drones? I can put enough C4 on a 2 lb drone to cause problems. The glass on the White House is designed to stop a .50 cal armor piercing sniper bullet. If you wanted to shoot the president, you'd be better off shooting through the wall. But a pound or two of C4 on a small drone, landing at the base of the wall may damage it enough for a clear shot, or dislodge one of the supremely heavy windows. Though I suspect that wouldn't work, for other reasons.

Comment: Re:Impractical (Score 1) 499

by AK Marc (#49794965) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage

If the connector was trying to provide 25 amps at 5 volts via the thin little wires, they would arc into gas almost immediately.

My phone charge does 5A at 5V without an issue, and my laptop doing 5A at 20V does so over tiny wires.

As an RV-er, I'm familar with both 12 volt and 120 volt systems. For a LED TV or other low wattage appliance, 12 volt is better, just because it directly comes from the batteries. However, for a load like a microwave, A/C, heater, or anything above 300 watts, trying to run that on 12 volts would require very fat, expensive cable.

You answer the question, then immediately forget the answer. You have AC at 240 (sigh, 110, if you must) and have outlets in some strategic areas (kitchens and for major appliances), and 12V or 48V everywhere else.

I think we should have a 48V internal wiring standard, with some 240V appliance plugs, for vacuums, refrigerators, washers and driers, and such. The dual-standard will complicate things slightly, but result in a large overall savings, as wall-warts are eliminated, and all their waste.

Comment: Re:Premature (Score 1) 499

by AK Marc (#49794893) Attached to: How Tesla Batteries Will Force Home Wiring To Go Low Voltage
More sense is 240 AC for appliances, and 12V or 48V for everything else. DC-DC stepping in the wall jack isn't hard. So you go to the jack at 48V, and there to 5V for your wall-wart voltages. With some for 12V or 48V for higher powered things.

If it were me, I'd design a mechanical switch in the plug that activated the circuit, so it would have zero loss when not used, unlike current wall warts. We use 110 VAC because it's what we've always used, not because it's a good voltage or current type.

Comment: Re:free... (Score 1) 268

by AK Marc (#49788905) Attached to: California Is Giving Away Free Solar Panels To Its Poorest Residents
You've said that the free lollipop given by a friend is free. Then you imply that the same exact lollipop transaction is no longer involving a "free" lollipop if your kid's friend stole it.

Free that requires unknowable knowledge of all previous owners of something before it's "gifted" to be able to determine whether it's free is a silly distinction.

Comment: Re:free... (Score 1) 268

by AK Marc (#49786815) Attached to: California Is Giving Away Free Solar Panels To Its Poorest Residents
No, it doesn't. "Free" peanuts aren't free. "Free" AOL disks aren't free.

By the restrictive "no cost to anyone anywhere" definition, there's nothing free, so the word is meaningless. If the word is meaningless, then it shouldn't exist. As it does exist, the most common "no cost to the user" definition is the obvious one to use.

Comment: Re:$70000 is poorest? (Score 1) 268

by AK Marc (#49786807) Attached to: California Is Giving Away Free Solar Panels To Its Poorest Residents
It's about $20k to get a setup that would let you plug in a panel, any panel. Building permits, the proper isolation, and all that. Then you can plug in panels for the cost of the panel plus mounting. But the pre-wiring to make the hardwired-mains solar ready is most of the cost (for me at least). Though I've seen the prices coming down on the hardware, the costs and delays getting permission to do it have gotten worse.

Comment: Re:reasons (Score 1) 319

by AK Marc (#49785369) Attached to: Why PowerPoint Should Be Banned
They do that to save production costs by having less show, and they also have plans to cut those parts out when they syndicate and move to slots where they are allowed more commercials per hour. When you make a 30 minute show with 15 minutes of comercials, you must fit in something for the 15 minutes in the hour gap, at least until you change the laws to allow for 30 minutes of commercials per hour.

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