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I'd rather my paycheck be denominated in ...

Displaying poll results.
The Almighty US Dollar
  5481 votes / 20%
Pounds sterling
  3287 votes / 12%
Pieces of Eight
  4477 votes / 16%
Yuan
  1177 votes / 4%
Imperial Credits
  3588 votes / 13%
Large stone disks
  1984 votes / 7%
Some other form (Explain below.)
  2850 votes / 10%
Paycheck?!
  4055 votes / 15%
26899 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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I'd rather my paycheck be denominated in ...

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  • by tanveer1979 (530624) on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:42AM (#34950034) Homepage Journal

    Where is the "GOLD" option guys. Probably the only "currency" which is outpacing inflation by many miles

    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:53AM (#34950102)

      Pieces of 8

      (Gold coins)

      • Which are treasured by, you guessed it, pirates. It's the most desirable form of compensation.
    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      Until someone invents replicators. Then we will have to switch to gold pressed latinum.

    • by Pharmboy (216950) on Friday January 21, 2011 @08:55AM (#34951096) Journal

      Where is the "GOLD" option guys. Probably the only "currency" which is outpacing inflation by many miles

      And just like the NASDAQ in 1999 and housing prices in 2006, it can only go up in value, right?

      • Last I checked, housing prices were still within the same order of magnitude they were in 2006. Less, but not mega-less. Paper money has no limit to how far it can drop in value. We call such a situation "hyper-inflation."

        • by arth1 (260657)

          Paper money has no limit to how far it can drop in value.

          Oh, I don't think it can go much below zero.

          • by Pharmboy (216950)

            Oh, I don't think it can go much below zero.

            Really? [wikipedia.org]

            It has been used as wall paper, swept off the streets like rubbish, and in Germany, was used to burn to keep warm because it was cheaper than the amount of wood it would buy. It *can* be worth zero, or very nearly.

            • by Pojut (1027544) on Friday January 21, 2011 @09:58AM (#34951648) Homepage

              Just to split a few hairs, paper money IS worth zero, regardless of inflation or anything else.

              It's paper (well...cloth, but whatever. I'm not trying to split a whole hairstyle here.) The only reason it has any value at all is because society at large agrees that it has value.

              • by TheLink (130905) on Friday January 21, 2011 @11:15AM (#34952712) Journal

                The only reason it has any value at all is because society at large agrees that it has value.

                But that's true for most things including gold, US dollars, Apple stock, rare stamps, Van Gogh paintings, numbers in your bank account stored in some computer somewhere, numbers in your WoW account stored in some computer somewhere.

                What would have inherent value to a human being would be stuff like good water/drinks and food.

                Once you get beyond the necessities for survival it goes to "if enough people think it's valuable, it's valuable" and "your mind makes it real".

      • by Lord Ender (156273) on Friday January 21, 2011 @02:27PM (#34956384) Homepage

        With gold, the downside risk is even worse than with the stock or housing market. A house is always worth something because it can generate income from rent. The same is true with stocks--the businesses on the whole will generate some profit, giving them some intrinsic value.

        Gold generates no rent, no profits, no nothing. Unlike investments that generate money, gold has no intrinsic value; it is traded on pure speculation (industrial use is an insignificant part of the market).

        In 1980 gold lost half its value basically overnight. There is no reason why this (or something worse) can't happen again.

    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      So...when the world ends, can you eat gold?

      Sorry, but gold is not the end-all utopia the guys on the radio are hawking it to be. Guess who is making money off of gold right now...it's the guys selling it and dealing in the stocks. It ain't the guy with a couple of Eagles in his home safe.

      We had the Great Depression on the gold standard, remember.
    • by Actually, I do RTFA (1058596) on Friday January 21, 2011 @12:06PM (#34953758)

      Where is the "GOLD" option guys

      It's right there: Pieces of eight. Pieces of eight are 1/8 of a gold coin.

    • by jedidiah (1196)

      Plus where's the Euro?

  • € (euro) (Score:5, Insightful)

    by paulatz (744216) on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:44AM (#34950048) Homepage
    I would not dislike €, just for the practicality of being able to spend it in the shop next door
    • Re:€ (euro) (Score:5, Informative)

      by michelcolman (1208008) on Friday January 21, 2011 @08:45AM (#34951026)
      I doubt anyone would want a pay-"check" in euros. Or is there anyone left in the Euro zone who still receives his/her salary printed on a piece of paper that has to be signed and physically taken to a bank? That antique method is only still used in certain banking impaired countries like the USA. The last option is the only logical choice for us Europeans.
      • by rwa2 (4391) *

        That's why I chose Imperial Credits. Political ramifications aside, it sounded like the closest things to ISK

      • Re:€ (euro) (Score:4, Interesting)

        by 1s44c (552956) on Friday January 21, 2011 @09:55AM (#34951624)

        I doubt anyone would want a pay-"check" in euros. Or is there anyone left in the Euro zone who still receives his/her salary printed on a piece of paper that has to be signed and physically taken to a bank? That antique method is only still used in certain banking impaired countries like the USA. The last option is the only logical choice for us Europeans.

        You have to be joking? People really get paid by paper cheque in the US when bank transfers are easier and cheaper?

        I thought bank transfers were common everywhere except perhaps for things you would not want the government tracking.

        • by wvmarle (1070040)

          I don't know about the US, but in Hong Kong I use cheques a lot. Because they are CHEAPER (for me) than a bank transfer. Cheques are free, while all transfers costs money - except when it happens to be within your own bank.

          Another option for a quick transfer that is free of charge is to withdraw cash and deposit it in the other bank (as long as the amount is not too big).

          Indeed I would expect that banks try to phase out cheques as I'd say a cheque transfer costs more money for them (due to the manual chec

        • Re:€ (euro) (Score:4, Informative)

          by billius (1188143) on Friday January 21, 2011 @11:08AM (#34952598)

          I doubt anyone would want a pay-"check" in euros. Or is there anyone left in the Euro zone who still receives his/her salary printed on a piece of paper that has to be signed and physically taken to a bank? That antique method is only still used in certain banking impaired countries like the USA. The last option is the only logical choice for us Europeans.

          You have to be joking? People really get paid by paper cheque in the US when bank transfers are easier and cheaper?

          I thought bank transfers were common everywhere except perhaps for things you would not want the government tracking.

          It's still an option, but most pretty much every employer offers you the option of having the money directly deposited. I myself haven't received an actual paper check in years. Still, many lower wage workers still receive paper checks and take them to those god awful check cashing places *shudder*

          • by Abstrackt (609015)

            Still, many lower wage workers still receive paper checks and take them to those god awful check cashing places *shudder*

            You have no idea. The company I work for employs a lot of people who don't have bank accounts so direct deposit is out and they cash their checks at the local money mart. They tend to take out more than it says on the check at what I consider a criminal level of interest and when those employees don't pay, guess who gets harassed day in day out? The employer.

            One day my boss got so sick of explaining that we were not responsible for the debt our employees incur with other companies that he threatened to f

        • Bank transfers for consumers in the US will generally run in the region of $2 or 2%, whichever is more. Not sure about companies.

          In the US, the 30-40 and under crowd does a lot of electronic banking. The 40+ crowd still relies on che(ck/que)s and cash. And by that I mean for both pay and to purchase things like groceries and gasoline.

          The last place I worked for, probably 50% or more of the employees got a piece of paper every 2 weeks that they'd take to the bank and have turned into numbers in their acco
          • by 1s44c (552956)

            Bank transfers for consumers in the US will generally run in the region of $2 or 2%, whichever is more. Not sure about companies.

            That's shocking. I didn't know you had it so bad. The fact this level of customer abuse doesn't happen in Europe is proof the US banks have no excuse for it.

            • Re:€ (euro) (Score:4, Informative)

              by apoc.famine (621563) <<moc.liamg> <ta> <enimaf.copa>> on Friday January 21, 2011 @02:04PM (#34955988) Homepage Journal
              The issue is that we're pretty much run by corporations now. All political decisions are weighed on whether or not they will hurt a corporate bottom line somewhere. That affects everything, including banking.

              While a percentage of us vote against the politicians that continue this madness, the vast majority are swayed by the hundreds of millions/billions of dollars the corporations pour into elections to keep them as profitable as possible. Why are corporations able to pour millions to billions of dollars into elections? Damn good question. The issue is that it will take people voting in politicians who want to fix that, and that's not likely. Due to the billions corporations will pour into elections to prevent those people from getting elected.
    • by Deag (250823)

      It is a rather blatant omission in the poll options. If you are going to have three real currencies then the euro should be in place of sterling.

  • Swiss Francs baby (Score:5, Insightful)

    by theolein (316044) on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:47AM (#34950072) Journal

    Probably the world's most stable and strong currency.

    • by Aeternitas827 (1256210) on Friday January 21, 2011 @06:10AM (#34950172)
      Hot dogs are undesirable as currency, really. Limited shelf life and all.
      • by Locke2005 (849178)
        "Once again, the conservative, sandwich-heavy portfolio pays off for the hungry investor!" -- Dr. Zoidberg
    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      I'd prefer Euros. Stable and very strong compared to the Pound and USD. Widely accepted so you don't loose out through conversion fees.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by rjhubs (929158)
        do you even read the news? euro has been weakening and becoming less stable with all the european countries having financial troubles. If it wasn't for Germany the euro would probably now be dead.
        • by Sprotch (832431)
          I have - newspapers have been going to town with unsubstantiated euro bashing. Luckily, I also look at how the euro is doing, as I'm paid in sterling but need to go to the eurozone often. Unfortunately (for me) the euro is doing much better than the sterling (and the dollar). But do continue to believe whatever the news say, it's always the truth.
    • by piripiri (1476949)
      Exactly.
  • ...accepted where Visa and MasterCard isn't.

  • Sandwiches (Score:5, Funny)

    by martas (1439879) on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:49AM (#34950080)
    Once again, the conservative, sandwich-heavy portfolio pays off for the hungry investor!
  • Australian dollars (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:51AM (#34950092)

    Australian dollars for me, thank you.

  • I want to be paid in barrels of oil. Unlike gold, it's a diminishing commodity with much utility. And when OPEC "diversifies" its currency medium, it will become de facto world currency.

    • But what about of delicious packs of Trident Layers? Haven't you seen the advertisements? They're set to become the de facto currency of the world much more quickly. OPEC moves too slow; teenagers move at the speed of DERP.
    • by AmiMoJo (196126)

      Not all that practical though. It needs to be refined before it is useful as petrol, plastic or whatever. The only people with refineries are not really interested in anything less than 1m barrels/day. You would find it hard to exchange for food/clothing/mortgage etc.

  • BitCoin! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by dokebi (624663) on Friday January 21, 2011 @05:56AM (#34950114)

    Where is BitCoin? This is slashdot after all.

  • I'd like to be paid in 1970 dollars, please. One hour at Wal-mart ( $6 ) will get me 18 gallons of gasoline.
  • by quenda (644621) on Friday January 21, 2011 @06:08AM (#34950158)

    Ningi please. In cash.
    Anyway, where in the civilised world have checks been used for wages in the last twenty years? They normally pay direct to your bank.

  • in Euro please, so I don't have to pay exchange rates and bank commission charges.

    Of course gold-pressed latinum would always be welcome so I can save for the future.

  • I'll take it in local currency wherever I happen to be, thank you, and at the moment that means yen.

  • Aussie dollars please. Because you leave them in the washing machine and still be able to spend them later.

    • by Chrisq (894406)

      Aussie dollars please. Because you leave them in the washing machine and still be able to spend them later.

      That must be most convenient for residents of Brisbane at the moment.

      • Aussie dollars please. Because you leave them in the washing machine and still be able to spend them later.

        That must be most convenient for residents of Brisbane at the moment.

        Yeah just dip them in fresh water if you can find any and hang them on the hills hoist to drip dry.

  • Beer tokens (Score:5, Funny)

    by funkatron (912521) on Friday January 21, 2011 @07:13AM (#34950486)
    I'll take whatever beer tokens the nearest good pub will accept. Currently that's the ones with pictures of Darwin on them. They have an old lady on the other side but I can't figure out why she's important.
  • A piece of the empire, obviously. Just like in the good old days.
  • If well is potentially dangerous if the genie is one the tricky ones, getting wishes granted would be a nice pay. And if you get bored of getting each month millons of dollars, all those girls, that mansion and traveling by plane without TSA checkings, you can wish that the sun turns into nova to go with a bang in style.
  • Since the United States is looking increasingly feudal, why not take it to the logical conclusion?

  • Zorkmids (Score:4, Interesting)

    by snookerhog (1835110) on Friday January 21, 2011 @09:59AM (#34951652)
    definitely Zorkmids.

    In Frobs we trust.

  • by DarthVain (724186) on Friday January 21, 2011 @11:16AM (#34952738)

    Or Guns and Ammo.

    Alternatively you can also pay me in fist bumps and good Karma.

  • by splerdu (187709) on Friday January 21, 2011 @02:08PM (#34956054)

    Bison Dollars! [cosplayisland.co.uk] Each one is worth £5.

  • by alvinrod (889928) on Friday January 21, 2011 @04:01PM (#34957984)
    I'd go with bottle caps. In the event of a nuclear holocaust at least the Hub merchants will let me buy water.

If I have seen farther than others, it is because I was standing on the shoulders of giants. -- Isaac Newton

 



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