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Comment For an organisation of your size - separate roles (Score 4, Insightful) 191

With 60 hosts and 1500 VMs I would certainly expect separate roles for enterprise architecture and system provision/admin. If you were talking about a a dozen hosts and 100 or fewer VMs then a sys admin with architectural responsibilities would be quite common. The main thing here is what can you do? My guess is with your experience they could use you overseeing a system admin team and doing EA, moving more to the latter as the team's experience grows.

Comment The map surprises me (Score 1) 198

Water stress in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland? You've got to be kidding! Where I live if you put a water butt outside with an open top it will fill up over winter. That's not with a pipe coming from the roof or anything like that, its just with the rain going directly through the hole in the top.

Comment Re:Crap. (Score 2) 151

Because of Linux, Solaris is no longer #1 OS. Meanwhile, Linux still has filesystems out of 20. century

memory overcommit is not turned off by default, basic data safety is not guaranteed, and now with systemd it behaves like Windows more than ever before. What a piece of crap OS.

If one of the BSD's were this popular, I would be fine with that, but in IT, it seems like biggest piece of crap always becomes the latest fad. Good job guys, the whole lot of you. Good job. Pat yourselves on the backs, idiots.

Yes it does, useful if you want to read old disks, but it also has many 21st century ones.

memory overcommit is not turned off by default, basic data safety is not guaranteed,

That's a two edge sword. In practice when running out of virtual memory Windows (without overcommit) comes to a halt, so it takes maybe 10 minutes to just bring up a menu. Linux (with overcommit) starts killing things. You are more likely to do a clean shutdown of the linux bits that havent been killed than of a windows box when this happens.,

and now with systemd it behaves like Windows more than ever before. ,

I haven't used it in anger enough to know. On a desktop it seems fine. I have a feeling that once I start serious server work it won't be nearly as flexible as init,

What a piece of crap OS.

If one of the BSD's were this popular, I would be fine with that, but in IT, it seems like biggest piece of crap always becomes the latest fad. Good job guys, the whole lot of you. Good job. Pat yourselves on the backs, idiots.

Comment Re:This could counterproductive (Score 1) 119

According to this most of the money comes from taxes goes to fund BBC World Service to Commonwealth and foreign nations so there is no cross funding with the Met.

According to the BBC's 2013/14 Annual Report, its total income was £5 billion (£5,066.0 million),[1] which can be broken down as follows: £3,726.1 million in licence fees collected from householders; £1,023.2 million from the BBC's Commercial Businesses; £244.6 million from government grants, of which £238.5 million is from the Foreign and Commonwealth Office for the BBC World Service; £72.1 million from other income, such as rental collections and royalties from overseas broadcasts of programming.

Ultimately the money for government grants and license fees comes from us (British citizens) though, as does funding to the met.

Comment This could counterproductive (Score 5, Insightful) 119

This could be one case where a tender doesn't make sense. The Met Office is obliged to give weather warnings, provide shipping weather information, etc. and if the BBC is cross-funding that then going elsewhere just means the government will have to give the Met Office more money directly. So now the public are funding the BBC to pay another company, and the Met Office too.

Comment Re:So what? (Score 1) 102

There are no royalties for trademarks.

Not strictly true, things are often manufactured "under license" also known as brand leasing, where the trademark owner allows someone else to use a trademark in return for royalties. This is particularly common in the world of beers, where popular overseas brands are often brewed under license". When I buy a can of an American beer in the UK, the chances are that it will have been nowhere near america and the small print on the can will say "brewed under license in the UK".

Comment Re:Why do some people want to prevent photography (Score 1) 280

Consider the following: Mugger beats the crap out of someone and robs them, later during his trial pictures of the victim are presented as evidence. Mugger then sues the police department and his victim for violation of his copyright to the art applied to the victims face.

... I would suggest that the police arrange a happening in the cells for the mugger afterwards, and keep full video and audio rights

Comment Re:Market in action (Score 3, Insightful) 54

Oracle is largely indifferent to consumer complaints because most of their consumers are big organizations that are often captive to their products.

But... if you're willing to eat the pain to get their attention, apparently you can get through to them that they're behaving like jackasses.

They have ways of leveraging the lock in. Once company I know of bought various products, one of which they found unsuitable and didn't use. When license renewal came up they asked nit to renew that product. Oracle's answer was "sure, but that was part of the negotiated package. If you don't take that you only get the standard discount, so it will cost you X $1,000s extra not to take that package". So the company carried on paying license and support for something it didn't use until the next round of purchasing when they could renegotiate.

"Why should we subsidize intellectual curiosity?" -Ronald Reagan

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