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Comment: Re:It's easier than that (Score 1) 314

by AmiMoJo (#47806811) Attached to: Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

I find that when I spend time in Japan at first I can't finish an average size meal. Lots of rice, lots of meat. After a a month or two I find that my body has adjusted and can finish them, but I lose weight anyway because the food is just better for me. Then when I get back to the west my capacity for western food is diminished. I have no explanation.

Comment: Re:The diet is unimportant... (Score 5, Insightful) 314

by AmiMoJo (#47806581) Attached to: Low-Carb Diet Trumps Low-Fat Diet In Major New Study

When people have a strong will, they are healthy.

Sorry, that's complete nonsense. The reality is that few people over the age of about 30 have a fully working, fully healthy body. Stuff goes wrong and it has nothing to do with will power, it's just genetic defects, the lasting effects of illness, accidents and age. Some people are lucky, some are not and telling the unlucky ones that they just need more "will power" is both insulting and unhelpful.

Careful selection of foods can have a huge impact of many people. I suffer from CFS and a diet that specifically supports the parts of my body that don't work very well any more really helps. The CFS developed as the result of an infection, it was nothing to do with my "will power" and no amount of will can snap me out of it.

Comment: Re:Wrong idea. (Score 1) 293

by AmiMoJo (#47806223) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

Can't trust cell phone cameras. By definition it's a camera attached to a communications device. It's designed to share that photo.

The problem is not so much that it is designed to share, it's that companies always make it the default to share. Apple, as you might expect, considered their iCloud to be secure and safe so why on earth not add value for the customer by backing up their precious memories? Customers buy into it, they always want more features and since many of them have lost data in the past an automatic "secure" backup system is very attractive.

If the default was "share, but don't trust the cloud and use your own locally stored encryption key" instead we wouldn't have this problem. A local key wouldn't even be that hard to manage... Well, not on NFC enabled devices, but even an iOS device could use BlueTooth or something for the sharing to avoid it ever going online. It wouldn't be 100% secure but it would stop all remote hacks dead. That's what we need to push for.

Comment: Re:Where are these photos? (Score 1) 293

by AmiMoJo (#47806183) Attached to: Reported iCloud Hack Leaks Hundreds of Private Celebrity Photos

When you see otherwise well educated and highly intelligent journalists on respected TV programmes like Newsnight struggling to understand exactly what is happening here I think it's easy to forgive the random person who bought and iPhone and didn't disable iCloud uploads.

I just told my girlfriend to make sure it was turned off. Her iPad is in Chinese so I couldn't read most of the set-up screens, but I think I un-ticked it. There were several screens worth of questions though, and she wanted some integration like bringing her contacts and apps over from her phone. I think for the average user many of the questions might as well be in Chinese so I kind of know how they feel.

Comment: Re:For a country so good at engineering... (Score 1) 191

by AmiMoJo (#47805741) Attached to: Radioactive Wild Boars Still Roaming the Forests of Germany

What is really helping Germany at the moment is that solar ties up with peak demand nicely. Unfortunately for energy companies peak demand was where they made a lot of their profit, but for Germany as a whole it means they have lots of high value electricity to sell to other countries and their grid doesn't need so much reserve capacity to meet their own peaks.

Also keep in mind that they are not scheduled to be nuclear free until the mid 2020s, so there is still a decade of development to go and this is only about the 1/3rd way through stage. Fukushima was in March 2011 and look how far they have already come.

Comment: Re:For a country so good at engineering... (Score 1) 191

by AmiMoJo (#47805703) Attached to: Radioactive Wild Boars Still Roaming the Forests of Germany

An engineer doesn't say "can't be done" (unless the laws of physics would be broken)

Unless they are being only misleadingly quoted. He said "can't be done" and then expanded on why it can't be done in the current world as it exists with the current political climate and commercial nuclear power companies.

Wind turbines kill birds.

Yes, but probably not as many as nuclear: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/E...

"Renewables" is typical green bullshit.

Now who is being dismissive and saying "can't be done"? Renewables are fine, with most of the objects just being the rantings of the rabid anti-green lobby.

Comment: Re:You could just use Salt... (Score 1) 206

by AmiMoJo (#47805631) Attached to: Power Grids: The Huge Battery Market You Never Knew Existed

Japan has deployed a few grid-scale sodium sulphur batteries, 40-50MW each, for smoothing the output of wind farms. They use a new process that runs them fairly cool, in the 90C range IIRC. The problem they have at the moment is that only one company makes them (patents) and they can't make them fast enough to cope with demand.

Comment: Re:Hijacking and theft (Score 1) 199

by AmiMoJo (#47805533) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

I've had goods delivered worth hundreds and not even have to sign off for it. (not that those scribbles are worth much IMHO, I've never understood why they don't require a picture of the person accepting the goods... heck, have them hold the package with the label clearly visible, should make denial-ability (sp?) much more cumbersome than it is now)

They deliberately don't bother with such a high level of security because most of the time it isn't worth it. From a business point of view it's better to keep times spent on deliveries as short as possible until you have a loss somewhere, and from that point on that one address gets a little more attention from the driver.

If you read the T&Cs they only guarantee to get "a signature", not actually deliver the package to a specific person most of the time. As long as someone signed for it it's your problem to figure out who and what they did with your package.

Comment: Re:What problem does this solve, again? (Score 1) 199

by AmiMoJo (#47805499) Attached to: Hidden Obstacles For Delivery Drones

Drones make sense for very rural areas. Instead of sending a van out to a remote farm or town a drone could be sent. It would need some infrastructure and the drones would be fairly large, fixed wing aircraft (maybe 3-4m wing span) with VTOL, but it could work. They could fly fairly high, out of range of microwave guns and most rifles, and then do a vertical landing at the (attended) target area.

What this country needs is a good five dollar plasma weapon.

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