Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Comment: Re:With the best will in the world... (Score 1) 388

In order for it not to pollute you would have to capture the soot and other products of combustion, and ideally the CO2 itself from the engine because otherwise it goes into the atmosphere and you have to reclaim it somehow. Maybe an engine that captures CO2 can be devised, but dealing with the other byproducts is still a problem.

Centralized generation of energy makes more sense because then you can either do it cleanly or at least capture everything that would be emitted and deal with it.

Comment: Re:With the best will in the world... (Score 1) 388

This is bad for Germany (they get very little money) and bad for France (it makes the nuclear fleet less profitable).

It's only bad if you are trying to make money. If you just want clean energy, it's excellent. For-profit generation seems to be the real issue.

In any case, wind turbines are easy to turn off. They blades are angled so as not to catch the wind and the gearbox can apply a brake if needs be.

Comment: Re:Ah the Z-80 (Score 3, Informative) 117

by AmiMoJo (#49558957) Attached to: When Exxon Wanted To Be a Personal Computing Revolutionary

8 bit MCUs are still very common and have many advantages of ARM. Cheap as ARM is it doesn't tend to get down to the few tens of cents range that 8 bit MCUs do, and the cores often require much more support hardware (such as voltage regulation because they can't run from 5V, or need 1.8V to get the power consumption down). Developing for them is also much more involved and particularly for high reliability applications it can be harder to audit the code and guarantee safe operation.

ARM has a lot of advantages too, but when you just need a cheap, easy to use (software and hardware wise) MCU that consumes next to now power 8 bit is still king.

Comment: Re:Google+ failed becuase it's GOOGLE (Score 3, Insightful) 319

by AmiMoJo (#49558909) Attached to: Google Insiders Talk About Why Google+ Failed

I don't want a nanny-search moving the things I'm looking for down the page. Just give me what I searched for, nothing more, nothing less, no "judgment" about what I want to see.

You don't want that. Maybe you are too young, maybe you just forgot what search engines were like back when they did just give execute the regex you typed in and return the raw results. Back in the early days of Alta Vista you typed in "microsoft" and the first 9,000 results were people's personal sites that contained the phrase "best viewed in Microsoft Internet Explorer 4". So you tried "microsoft+home+page" and got a list of people's personal home pages.

The reason Google is number 1 at search is because it evaluates what you mean when you type in "microsoft", and gives you microsoft.com as the first result.

Comment: Re:Google Streams (Score 1) 319

by AmiMoJo (#49558787) Attached to: Google Insiders Talk About Why Google+ Failed

The YouTube thing was never about getting people on to G+, it was about cleaning up YouTube. Anonymous accounts lead to every video's comments being filled with abuse. Once people started using their real names it cleared up pretty quickly. There is still trolling of course, but it's been vastly reduced from what it once was.

I still wish they had found another way to do it, because G+ is actually pretty good. It's not like facebook where people basically treat their timeline like toilet paper. People post good stuff on G+, highly technical and insightful. It's the social network for intellectuals.

Comment: Re:The best encryption: No encryption (Score 1) 224

by AmiMoJo (#49550271) Attached to: Allegation: Philly Cops Leaned Suspect Over Balcony To Obtain Password

TrueCrypt hidden containers get around that problem by hiding the real secret data inside a dummy encrypted container that you can hand over the password to. Any unused space will be filled with random bytes, as is the norm for a TrueCrypt container, so isn't suspicious.

Comment: Re:Done in movies... (Score 3, Insightful) 224

by AmiMoJo (#49550209) Attached to: Allegation: Philly Cops Leaned Suspect Over Balcony To Obtain Password

Capable isn't the same as well screw everyone else over at the first opportunity.

I once left two bags if expressive shopping items on a train in Japan. Next day I collected them as a cleaner had handed them in. Could easily have taken some stuff and never been caught, but didn't. Once a friend left 50,000 yen in a restaurant. That's about â300 or $400. Went back the next day, it was all waiting for her, found by the staff and kept safe.

In some cultures people are basically nice. It's actually quite shocking for British people when they go to Japan and people just trust them by default. In the UK that will get you screwed over fast.

Comment: Re:Done in movies... (Score 3, Insightful) 224

by AmiMoJo (#49550203) Attached to: Allegation: Philly Cops Leaned Suspect Over Balcony To Obtain Password

If murder were legalised most people would not start murdering. Most people don't commit serious crimes because of morality. Minor crimes, especially victimless ones, are another matter because there are fewer moral qualms.

Fear of being caught tends to come far down the list. A long time ago in England almost all crimes carried the death sentence. 10 year old children were hung for stealing. It didn't really reduce the crime rate. If anything it just made people driven to crime by poverty more likely to murder the police trying to catch them, since death was certain anyway.

Comment: Re:faint whiff of BS? (Score 1) 301

by AmiMoJo (#49548119) Attached to: Microsoft, Chip Makers Working On Hardware DRM For Windows 10 PCs

Actually hardware security is pretty good. Secure description chips where the key is stored in a special memory and wiped instantly if you try to open the chip up have proven fairly resilient so far.

Each computer will have a unique key that is used to encrypt media before it is downloaded, and a private key you can't read out of the chip to decode it. Like AACS for bluray the crack will probably be a flaw in the algorithm, not in the hardware.

The disks are getting full; purge a file today.

Working...