Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
Businesses Microsoft

Microsoft Interns Still Feel the Love 293

theodp writes "Despite layoffs and a blip in earnings, the Chicago Trib reports that Microsoft's summer interns still enjoy the VIP treatment. Although there were 20% fewer of them this year than last, still 85% of the interns are offered full-time jobs. In addition to being paid $4,600-$6,000 a month, a housing stipend, and relocation costs for the summer, the 600 or so Microsoft apprentices enjoyed other perks — such as a police escort to speed their way to a private museum party where they screened the most recent Harry Potter movie and were given a free Xbox 360. 'You feel like royalty to be escorted by police,' said Joriz De Guzman, an intern working toward his MBA at Wharton. BTW, before he got mixed up with those MBA-types, De Guzman earned some fame as the Doogie Howser of computer science."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Microsoft Interns Still Feel the Love

Comments Filter:
  • Escort (Score:4, Insightful)

    by DoofusOfDeath ( 636671 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:12PM (#29401845)

    such as a police escort to speed their way to a private museum party where they screened the most recent Harry Potter movie and were given a free Xbox 360.

    Before I get too angry, I should make sure I'm clear on something. Does this mean Microsoft paid money for people to get preferred treatment on the roads?

    • Re:Escort (Score:5, Informative)

      by Trepidity ( 597 ) <delirium-slashdot AT hackish DOT org> on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:23PM (#29401891)

      This [physorg.com] version of the story has some more defensiveness that elaborates more on that:

      As for the Pacific Science Center shindig, [Kerry Olin, general manager for university recruiting] said, "It's actually a fairly low-budget effort because of our relationships with the studios and that kind of thing." He said the police escort "is a nice story for the students. The truth of the matter is we just try to cooperate with the police when we're trying to move a dozen buses across town at rush hour."

      (A State Patrol spokesman said police escorts are contracted privately and paid for by the person or company that hires them.)

      The free Xboxes are an investment, too, Olin said. "We also get some of our technology on campuses in the hands of thought leaders.

    • Re:Escort (Score:5, Funny)

      by pitchpipe ( 708843 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:25PM (#29401901)
    • by alen ( 225700 )

      no, everyone knows M$ employees are royalty

    • Re:Escort (Score:5, Funny)

      by Korbeau ( 913903 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:39PM (#29401953)

      Just came back from the screening and yeah, that got me real angry too. Under the benefits section of the contract, I had no idea that the "free escort" was a lousy trip to the museum to see Harry Potter ! And I already had an Xbox !

    • This is common (Score:2, Insightful)

      by zogger ( 617870 )

      Look at what they do for professional sports stadiums every weekend. Heck, look downstream from there,at how much public property tax money is used across the nation to brainwash little kids and get them addicted and operate those same pro sports farm teams in the public school system (which is all they are, subsidized farm teams).

      If you got the cash and "the juice", what is public can become private *real quick*.

    • They already have that you know.. if you pay for the permit and any extra costs, chances are your police department will escort you

      • Re:Escort (Score:5, Interesting)

        by Mashiki ( 184564 ) <mashikiNO@SPAMgmail.com> on Saturday September 12, 2009 @09:22PM (#29402439) Homepage

        Quite correct. Buying a permit, plus officer costs, plus vehicle rental, plus officer OT will get you your very own police escort. It's not that expensive. Probably around $600-900/per hr officer plus permit. You too can feel like a big shot, of course some companies to that just to feel big. Some companies also hire in clothes police as extra protection when their regular duty security can't cut the slack. Because even a cop who's on duty there is still a cop.

        This is quite common in Canada for a lot of bars in University towns, they'll hire cops to patrol the floors/entrances just for the extra security. And the cops will send out their own as well just to show the flag(officer presence) to keep the peace.

    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by coaxial ( 28297 )

      Yeah. Tell me about it. I was a MSR [microsoft.com] intern last year. Non-Research interns got the red carpet, while Research's got the shaft. On day one, HR told us, "We have several intern events planned this year, but not every group will go to each event. So if you hear that some interns are going rock climbing and you're not, don't worry. It will be made up with some hiking or wine tasting event. Same thing with baseball tickets. Different groups go on different days, so don't worry."

      That police escort was to

      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Ihmhi ( 1206036 )

        On the bright side, I used my corporate discount and corporate debit card to buy this sweet 17" MacBook Pro. (Right back at you BillG and SteveB!)

        You fool! Surely they'll send Rover [wikipedia.org] for you now! RUN!

    • OK i get that this post has an incorrect assumption that is clarified by trepity, but how the fuck is this trolling? Its a genuine question, and tbh i would be pretty angry if it were true. or to put it another way, learn to mod fscking noobs!

  • by fahrbot-bot ( 874524 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:20PM (#29401873)

    ...Microsoft apprentices enjoyed other perks -- such as a police escort to speed their way to a private museum party where they screened the most recent Harry Potter...

    The escort was so they couldn't escape (possibly to watch a good movie).

    ...and were given a free Xbox 360.

    Perk or punishment? I have a friend with a few scratched up disks that would argue the latter...

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Anonymous Coward

      My 12 year old son has a 360 and about 40 games and hasn't scratched any yet. Maybe your friend should grow up.

  • My experience (Score:5, Interesting)

    by joaommp ( 685612 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @07:53PM (#29402029) Homepage Journal

    I was one of Microsoft's interns some time ago and I can tell you that it was nothing like they described in the article. I was actually very poorly treated (and my boss was a big jerk). Amongst other things (mostly Denmark related, and not directly Microsoft), my boss was one of the reasons I didn't want to stay there and why I made sure I wouldn't.

    But, it was in Denmark (Microsoft Development Center Copenhagen), so it seems to be something localized.

  • by 93 Escort Wagon ( 326346 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @08:12PM (#29402127)

    I'm sure Microsoft has evidence that the money they're investing in the various internship programs nets them something tangible in the long term - otherwise they wouldn't do it. I've known a couple people who've been MS interns, and they were both pretty happy with the program. I'm not sure why people here are giving MS such grief over this (yes, I'm new here, thank you for asking) - this is pretty standard stuff for most large tech companies.

    But I must admit I still smile whenever I walk into the Paul Allen Center - home of the University of Washington's CSE department - and see the disproportionate number of students using Mac laptops there in the main atrium. Looks like the Beatles were right on that score...

  • This makes me curious. What does it cost to rent out the local cops to provide entertainment for your party? Do they let you play with the siren? Can the motorcade break the speed limit? How about the local ambulance corps, can they juggle plasma bags? Can I get a guarantee that they won't get called away to deal with some boring disturbance on the wrong side of the tracks before the song and dance number is complete? Do they bring their own hookers, or is prostituting themselves enough?

    How is this legal? (

    • by wampus ( 1932 )

      You can rent off-duty cops in lots of places for event security and whatnot.

      • So, can I rent off duty Marines to kill your rented cops? That would be sweet, until some Goddamn Trustafarian wunderkind rents SEALs to cull my Marines. See how quickly the fun of turning the State into your private plaything reaches a dead end?
      • So, if they're off-duty, then how is it a police escort? It would be an escort of people who happen to work as cops in their day job. I mean, they aren't allowed to wear uniform and use police vehicles for private profit when off-duty, are they?
        • I mean, they aren't allowed to wear uniform and use police vehicles for private profit when off-duty, are they?

          Who's gonna arrest them if they aren't - you ?-)

    • http://www.physorg.com/news170614813.html [physorg.com]

      As for the Pacific Science Center shindig, he said, "It's actually a fairly low-budget effort because of our relationships with the studios and that kind of thing." He said the police escort "is a nice story for the students. The truth of the matter is we just try to cooperate with the police when we're trying to move a dozen buses across town at rush hour."

      (A State Patrol spokesman said police escorts are contracted privately and paid for by the person or company that hires them.)

      Apparently, it is perfectly legal.

  • looks like microsoft has a high turnover rate, could be a lot of employees walk off the job later and microsoft has to keep fresh faces coming in to replace them...
    • Actually, an intern position cannot even be hired unless there's sufficient full-time headcount available when the student is supposed to graduate. After completing an internship, the question becomes "do we want to keep this person?" because the position had to be available in case the intern was a keeper. Hiring interns is really nothing more than a "try before you buy" way of hiring.
  • Royalty? (Score:5, Funny)

    by commodoresloat ( 172735 ) * on Saturday September 12, 2009 @08:25PM (#29402177)

    'You feel like royalty to be escorted by police,' said Joriz De Guzman, an intern working toward his MBA at Wharton

    I don't know about this; when I got busted for drunk driving I had a police escort all the way to the station, but I didn't feel like royalty at all.

  • by Kenz0r ( 900338 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @08:44PM (#29402249) Homepage
    If this were Google, most of you'd be praising them, for being such a great employer.

    How about we judge a software company by their software and business ethics, there's plenty of things to dislike Microsoft for in those departments...
    • by minsk ( 805035 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @09:25PM (#29402455)

      Have to voice agreement on that. Microsoft puts a lot of effort into attracting excellent developers and trying to keep them happy. The developers and front-line managers I've talked to struck me as a decent, and I know more than a few people who have settled in there.

      There are lots of reasons to rip on MS and their products... but I'm not seeing good treatment of good interns as one of those.

  • Pretty standard. (Score:3, Insightful)

    by MrCrassic ( 994046 ) <deprecated@ema . i l> on Saturday September 12, 2009 @08:48PM (#29402281) Journal

    It's usually the bigger companies that offer these perks for their interns. That and the high pay they receive are usually the incentives for students to work kind of hard to get a spot in one of these programs...

    Hence, it's no surprise that because these companies are bigger, there would be an increased risk of dealing with crappy managers and boring dead-end work. Overall, the people I know that have worked in such companies were usually happy with their expereinces...

  • Bill gates would probably never got a job at MS.
    The interviews by Macgregor and Ballmer were strict. And one favorite was questions such the High-low number puzzle.
    Bill himself failed this test when asked by a reporter one day.

    . Ballmer said(of these types of questions), you could assess the "smartness" of someone. Ref: Hard Drive. Wallace & Erickson. 1992
    • Of course. That is the intent. Don't you see it?
      Ballmer wants another shotgun riding Bill like another hole in the ass.
      The idea of an exam is NOT to ascertain what you know. It is to expose what you DON'T know.
      (with apologies to Churchill).

  • by Restil ( 31903 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @09:38PM (#29402495) Homepage

    Ever see a carnival that takes in several city streets and blocks traffic for the duration? It depends on the city, but most cities will, for the right price, allow companies, or even private citizens to purchase the rights to have exclusive control over specific public facilities or resources for a short period of time. It's usually not cost effective to do so, and you're therefore not likely to see a great deal of it. The only example I know of with real numbers would be the First Saturday sale in Dallas, TX. I don't even know if it's still there, but back in the mid 90's when I was a vendor there for a few months, I asked about it. For a few public parking lots and to block one street in Dallas on a Saturday, they paid $5000 for a 24 hour permit.
    And yes, you can rent cops.. in uniforms... with cars, for pretty much anything you want.

    The real question isn't how they could do such a thing, but why they would even bother. I never thought of a group of interns going to a Harry Potter movie as being an event worthy of a police escort, let alone requiring one.

    -Restil

    • The real question isn't how they could do such a thing, but why they would even bother. I never thought of a group of interns going to a Harry Potter movie as being an event worthy of a police escort, let alone requiring one.

      Clearly you've never tried to get across WA-520 during Rush Hour.

  • by lucm ( 889690 ) on Saturday September 12, 2009 @10:35PM (#29402725)

    Good money, plenty of perks... this is not the Apple way.

    A few years ago the company was on the brink of disaster and made huge salary cuts. Now they are making sh*tloads of money, thanks to the iPod and iPhone, but the salaries are still low. Last year, Techcrunch published data pulled from Glassdoor.com, showing that Apple engineers are paid 15-20% less than their counterparts at Google, Microsoft and Yahoo.

    Some food for thought: who made more money at Microsoft? Steve Ballmer or Bill Gates? and who made more money at Apple? Steve Jobs or Steve Wozniak? Engineers always have been a commodities for Apple.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by BitwizeGHC ( 145393 )

      That's because at Apple, design is law. Engineering exists to support design.

    • by SeaFox ( 739806 )

      Last year, Techcrunch published data pulled from Glassdoor.com, showing that Apple engineers are paid 15-20% less than their counterparts at Google, Microsoft and Yahoo.

      And yet, are the innovators at Apple or Microsoft? Perhaps Apple is guilty of hiring people who care more about what they do than how much they make doing it.

  • When I was an intern at a local dev shop, I had 2 main projects on which I was the sole developer.. Cracking and extracting data from a bizarre proprietary compression scheme, and writing a PCL5 emulator/converter... I only got $10/hour doing it, but it was a lot more interesting/educational than anything I've done since I graduated and started making 5x times that much.
  • For those who missed the dot-com boom, read this: [archive.org] "In the outer lobby and decadent smoking lounge, the top sales guys from VA Linux flashed their nametags in an effort to secure some immediate female profit taking from one of the most impressive IPOs of recent weeks. Elsewhere the women of Snowball danced with wild abandon and Dexter from Scent.com tried to sell me a unit that would include smell in my daily internet experience. As I quietly exited the scene, I caught view of a woman in a long dress being

  • Microsoft and Google (Score:5, Informative)

    by RzUpAnmsCwrds ( 262647 ) on Sunday September 13, 2009 @12:27AM (#29403105)

    I interned for Microsoft in 2008 and for Google last summer.

    At Microsoft, we got a police escort to the zoo. But, to be honest, while the story casts it as a VIP thing, it's actually set up to minimize traffic disruption.

    Microsoft has 800+ interns in the Redmond area, which means about 20 buses if they need to go anywhere at once. Attempting to push 20 buses through already congested streets is a nightmare. Better to shut down the roads for a couple of minutes than risk an accident or clog up the streets.

    The housing benefit isn't exactly a steal. You can share an apartment (with another MS intern) for about $600/mo, or they will give you $3000 to find housing on your own. I chose the latter.

    Relocation costs are effectively plane fare plus a couple of days of car rental, or mileage if you drive.

    I was offered a full-time job, but I turned it down because I was more interested in graduate school. The full time job is contingent on working for the same group that you interned with. I must admit that the package they offer is pretty tempting.

    Google paid me considerably more than Microsoft. I worked in my home city (Boulder CO), so I didn't need relocation or housing. I did get to spend a week in Mountain View (paid for by Google) for orientation and training.

    Google didn't have any major events in Boulder, but I'm not sure about Mountain View.

    Google's interview process was considerably easier than Microsoft's, but that's because at Microsoft interns go through the full interview process (for me, two phone interviews plus 4 interviews onsite at Microsoft). Google does not offer interns full-time jobs unless they go through a conversion process that includes the full interview track.

    Both Microsoft and Google had me doing real work that went into actual products. My code was reviewed, just like a normal employee. I went to meetings, had performance evaluations, and worked an 8-9 hour day, just like a normal employee.

    By the way, if anyone wants to know about the interview process:

    - Neither company asks 'brain-teaser' questions anymore. It's straight-up CS fundamentals, algorithms, and data structures.
    - I was interviewed by actual developers from the teams that I ended up working for. These people know their shit and will see through BS.

    There's no magic trick or great mystery here. Either you know your shit and can get hired, or you don't and it will be apparent.

  • Your ZiL on the way to the 'party' to watch western movie and get gifts.
    The streets cleared for the bright Komsomol kids.
    Then back to learning how to embrace extend and extinguish the world.

Disc space -- the final frontier!

Working...