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Submission + - Do Screen Time Limits Reduce The Likelihood of a Kid Learning to Code?

theodp writes: Following the conventional wisdom that too much screen time is bad for kids, President Obama and First Lady Michelle famously limited their daughters' use of technology to weekends. But new guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics studies suggest we were wrong about limiting children's screen time, and new Google-Gallup research argues that students deprived of daily use of a computer at home are at a disadvantage when it comes to learning CS. So, could it be that the President's well-intentioned screen time limits contributed to his daughters' failure to take to coding in the way he'd like? And if one wants to raise a coder, might parents actually be better off emulating the Onion's 'Craig Georges' ("I've never once considered monitoring my child’s screen time. I guess I’m a better parent than I realized.") rather than the First Family? Interestingly, Melinda Gates recently blamed the decline of girls in CS since 1984 on video games — Gates argued a move away from gender-neutral games discouraged girls from playing, but that was also around the same time that well-meaning parents started limiting children's joystick time in general, worried that playing video games posed a danger to child development (we were apparently wrong about that one, too). So, how much time did you spend on a computer as a kid and/or how much time do your kids? Do you think screen time limits reduce the likelihood of kids learning to code before they hit college?

Submission + - AT&T-Time Warner may signal start of new media industry consolidation (

Mr D from 63 writes: The tie-up of AT&T Inc and Time Warner Inc, bringing together one of the country's largest wireless and pay TV providers and cable networks like HBO, CNN and TBS, could kick off a new round of industry consolidation amid massive changes in how people watch TV.

Media content companies are having an increasingly difficult time as standalone entities, creating an opportunity for telecom, satellite and cable providers to make acquisitions, analysts say.

Media firms face pressure to access distribution as more younger viewers cut their cable cords and watch their favorite shows on mobile devices. Distribution companies, meanwhile, see acquiring content as a way to diversify revenue.

Of course, Time Warner and AT&T reps claim this is necessary just to compete. Regulatory scrutiny may not see it that way.

Submission + - Chemical Bike Lock Causes Vomiting to Deter Thieves writes: Ever had a bike stolen? Bike thieves have had virtually free rein around San Francisco and the Bay area for years, stealing thousands every year, turning warehouses and underpasses into chop shops, victimizing residents and city officials alike. But BBC reports on a new weapon in the arsenal of devices developed to thwart would-be thieves — a bicycle lock that spews a pressurized, stinking gas if someone attempts to cut the lock. The company claims its "noxious chemical" is so disgusting it "induces vomit in the majority of cases." Even better, it claims, the gas causes "shortness of breathing" and impaired eyesight. The company says that the compressed gas is perfectly safe — and can only be released "by trying to cut through it with an angle grinder". If the chemical countermeasure is released, it is a one-time only use, and the lock — which costs over $100 — will have to be replaced. But the hope is that the unpleasant experience will cause them to abandon the attempted theft, leaving the bicycle behind. The inventors have not yet tested the device on an actual would-be thief, but have tested it on themselves and volunteers at distances of two feet, five feet, 10ft and 20ft. “At two feet it was pretty bad. It was absolutely vomit inducing in 99% of people. At five feet it’s very noticeable and the initial reaction is to move away from it. At 10ft it’s definitely detectable and very unpleasant.”

Submission + - A solution for DDOS packet flooding attacks (

dgallard writes: On October 21, 2016, a DDOS attack crippled access to major Web sites including Amazon and Netflix.

PEIP (Path Enhanced IP) extends the IP protocol to enable determining the router path of packets sent to a target host. Currently, there is no information to indicate which routers a packet traversed on its way to a destination (DDOS target) enabling use of forged source IP addresses to attack the target via packet flooding.

PEIP changes all that. Rather than attempting to prevent attack packets, instead, PEIP provides a way to rate-limit all packets based on their router path to a destination. In this way, DDOS attacks can be thwarted be simply only allowing them a limited amount of bandwith.

Submission + - "Splat" of Schiaparelli Mars lander likely found (

Tablizer writes: "Views from NASA’s Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter released Friday show the crash site where Europe’s experimental Schiaparelli lander fell to the red planet’s surface from a height of several miles, leaving a distinct dark patch on the Martian landscape...

The image from MRO’s context camera shows two new features attributed to the Schiaparelli spacecraft, including a large dark scar spanning an estimated 50 feet (15 meters) by 130 feet (40 meters). Schiaparelli’s ground team believes it is from the high-speed impact of the lander’s main body...

A little more than a half-mile (1 kilometer) to the south, a bright spot appears in the image, likely the 39-foot-diameter (12-meter) supersonic parachute and part of Schiaparelli’s heat shield, which released from the lander just before ESA lost contact."

Submission + - How are all these IoT devices on public address space to be hacked?

ChesterRafoon writes: Nearly all of these IoT devices mentioned in the latest internet bot attacks are consumer devices — webcams, thermostats, DVRs, things like that. Most consumer (home) network setups would host these kinds of devices on private address space behind a NAT box of some type. So how on earth where all these devices exposed to the WAN so that telnet (of all things) could attempt to connect and hijack them?

Submission + - AT&T Buys Time Warner in $86 Billion Deal (

dos4who writes: AT&T Inc. has reached an agreement to buy Time Warner Inc. for $86 billion, according to a person familiar with the plans, in a deal that would transform the phone company into a media giant.

Submission + - Australian Man Claims His iPhone 7 Exploded And Destroyed His Car (

MojoKid writes: Are our ever more powerful, compact and thin smartphones putting us at risk? Or are we just more sensitized to events like smartphones blowing up since Samsung's nasty Galaxy Note 7 debacle? Regardless, it's beginning to look a lot like the latest smartphone feature trend is spontaneous combustion. While taking a surfing lesson, Australian Mat Jones put his brand-new iPhone 7 underneath some clothing on the seat of his car, safe and sound. Or, so he thought. Upon returning to his vehicle, it was filled with smoke and the source was undeniably his iPhone 7. Not only was the phone destroyed, but his car was torched as well. All smartphones using Lithium-ion batteries have the capability of exploding or catching fire, due to their internal chemical makeup, but under normal circumstances and operating conditions this should never be an issue. Extreme heat can be one contributor to a catastrophic event like this, but that seems an unlikely cause as temperatures are moderate right now at the South Coast of Australia — about 20C (68F) on average. The iPhone 7 in question was also not charging at the time as well. Apple is reportedly working with Jones to determine root cause of the explosion.

Submission + - Is Disclosure of Podesta's emails a Step to Far? (

mspohr writes: Interesting discussion between Glenn Greenwald and Naomi Klein on The Intercept on the limits of disclosure and privacy.
"...the author and activist Naomi Klein believes there are serious threats to personal privacy and other critical political values posed by hacks of this sort, particularly when accompanied by the indiscriminate publication of someone’s personal emails."
The article notes that back in the early days, Wikileaks carefully vetted its leaks to avoid compromising personal information. However, the latest leaks of DNC email have no editing and contain personal information such as discussion of personal problems of individuals unrelated to any public purpose.
"But personal emails — and there’s all kinds of personal stuff in these emails — this sort of indiscriminate dump is precisely what Snowden was trying to protect us from. That’s why I wanted I wanted to talk with you about it, because I think we need to continuously reassert that principle."
Do Wikileaks or journalists have any responsibility to privacy?

Submission + - 'Calibration error' changes GOP votes to Dem in Illinois (

Okian Warrior writes: Early voting in Illinois got off to a rocky start Monday, as votes being cast for Republican candidates were transformed into votes for Democrats.

Republican state representative candidate Jim Moynihan: “I tried to cast a vote for myself and instead it cast the vote for my opponent,” Moynihan said. “You could imagine my surprise as the same thing happened with a number of races when I tried to vote for a Republican and the machine registered a vote for a Democrat.”

The conservative website Illinois Review reported that “While using a touch screen voting machine in Schaumburg, Moynihan voted for several races on the ballot, only to find that whenever he voted for a Republican candidate, the machine registered the vote for a Democrat in the same race. He notified the election judge at his polling place and demonstrated that it continued to cast a vote for the opposing candidate’s party. Moynihan was eventually allowed to vote for Republican candidates, including his own race.

Submission + - Google Goes on Virtual Reality Hiring Spree Amid Daydream Launch (

An anonymous reader writes: Google, who began their journey into the world of modern virtual reality with 'Cardbord' in 2014 (, has since made the immersive technology central to the future of Android. The company announced Daydream (, a high-end Android VR initiative earlier this year, and announced the first Daydream ready phone and headset (the Google Pixel and Daydream View) earlier this month. Surrounding these announcements, the company has been adding significantly to its VR talent pool, publishing seven full time VR job listings in the last 30 days alone, and no less than 15 VR job listings in the last 12 months. Those new positions will augment the company's VR team which industry publication Road to VR speculates to number between 50 and 100 employees.

Submission + - Would redundancy and really long TTL have countered a lot of DDOS effects? ( 1

marmot7 writes: My primary takeaways from this article was that it's important to have redundancy (additional NS's) and that it's important to have a very long TTL when you're not actively updating something. Would the measures in this article have at least limited the damage of these attacks? The long TTL change alone would have made the cache likely covered the entire attack, right?

Submission + - Is a Mini Ice Age Coming? 'Maunder Minimum' Spurs Controversy (

An anonymous reader writes: A scientist who claims waning solar activity in the next 15 years will trigger what some are calling a mini ice age has revived talk about the effects of man-made versus natural disruptors to Earth's climate.

Valentina Zharkova, a professor of mathematics at Northumbria University in the United Kingdom, used a new model of the sun's solar cycle, which is the periodic change in solar radiation, sunspots and other solar activity over a span of 11 years, to predict that "solar activity will fall by 60 percent during the 2030s to conditions last seen during the 'mini ice age' that began in 1645," according to a statement.

Submission + - Spare the Screen Time, Spoil the Child?

theodp writes: For years, the conventional wisdom has been that too much screen time is bad for kids. Indeed, the Obamas famously limited their 11- and 14-year-old daughters' use of technology to weekends, and banned watching TV on weekdays. But now, Engadget reports, new guidelines issued by the American Academy of Pediatrics studies suggest we were wrong about limiting children's screen time. So, with new Google-Gallup research suggesting that students deprived of daily use of a computer at home are placed at a disadvantage when it comes to learning CS, could it be that the President's well-intentioned screen time limits contributed to his daughters' failure to take to coding in the way he'd like? Might he have been better off to emulate the Onion's 'Craig Georges' ("I've never once considered monitoring my child’s screen time. I guess I’m a better parent than I realized.")?

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