Submission + - Cach chua dau tinh hoan (namkhoa497.net)

dongphuong497 writes: Cách cha au tinh hoàn phù hp, tích cc khi c áp dng s giúp nam gii thoát khi nhng h ly do cn bnh này gây ra. au tinh hoàn là mt trong nhng triu chng bnh lý thng gp nam gii cn phi iu tr úng hng ngn chn nhng nh hng không tt ti sc khe và kh nng sinh sn.

Submission + - The bug from 2000 still exist on Windows 7 and 8 (surge.sh)

An anonymous reader writes: The new bug, which fortunately doesn't appear to afflict Windows 10, uses another special filename. This time around, the special filename of choice is $MFT. $MFT is the name given to one of the special metadata files that are used by Windows' NTFS filesystem. The file exists in the root directory of each NTFS volume, but the NTFS driver handles it in special ways, and it's hidden from view and inaccessible to most software. Attempts to open the file are normally blocked, but in a move reminiscent of the Windows 9x flaw, if the filename is used as if it were a directory nameâ"for example, trying to open the file c:\$MFT\123â"then the NTFS driver takes out a lock on the file and never releases it. Every subsequent operation sits around waiting for the lock to be released.Forever. This blocks any and all other attempts to access the file system, and so every program will start to hang, rendering the machine unusable until it is rebooted.

Submission + - Two Factor Authentication – Best for the UNIX/Linux Server Security (revesecure.com)

REVE secure writes: The UNIX/Linux server security is challenging because these servers are at a risk of getting compromised at any point of time by the attackers. In today’s enterprise environment, the UNIX and Linux servers are growing popular. With their increased popularity, these servers have become the primary target of the attackers for security breaches. There have been numerous cases of harmful external security threats where the attackers have gained access to these servers; UNIX and Linux, through the Internet. The largest security threat to UNIX/Linux server is internal, not external. Therefore, it is must for the enterprises to improve their UNIX/Linux server security, so that comprising server becomes complicated for the hackers......

Submission + - Guy Buys Movie Ticket, Internet Outraged (ricochet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A Brooklyn movie theater recently scheduled a special screening of Wonder Woman open only to women. Cinema/dining chain Alamo Drafthouse said on their website, "Apologies, gentlemen, but we're embracing our girl power and saying 'No Guys Allowed' for several special shows at the Alamo Downtown Brooklyn. And when we say 'Women (and people who identify as women) only,' we mean it."

Movie fan (and my Conservatarians podcast partner-in-crime) Stephen Miller decided he wanted to see a new superhero flick, so he bought a ticket online. Upon sharing this rather mundane act, the Internet exploded, as is its wont.

Alamo Drafthouse is in a bit of a pickle here. New York City law strictly prohibits them from discriminating by gender. In fact, New York City prohibits even advertising women-only events, meaning that Alamo is already in violation of the law.

After years of progressives demanding that businesses bake cakes and open bathrooms, it’s cathartic to see them reverse their position when it offends their consciences. Miller is offering them a minor, even friendly, clinic on the brave new world they have created.

Submission + - Puffin Atlantic (youtube.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Atlantic Puffin is the only puffin that is found in the Atlantic ocean. The other two puffin species, the Tufted Puffin and the Horned Puffin, are found in the North Pacific Ocean. Puffins are amazing in that they both fly and dive to great depths.

Like other bird species, the Atlantic Puffin belongs to the Kingdom Animalia, the Phylum Chordata, and the Class Aves. It belongs to the Order Charadriiformes, the Family Alcidae, the Genus Fratercula, and the Species arctica. Its scientific name is Fratercula arctica, and it was first described by Carl Linnaeus in 1758. Other names that have been given to the Atlantic Puffin are Common Puffin, Puffin, Puffin Auk, Labrador Auk, Sea Parrot, Pope, Bottle-Nose, Tammy Norie, Coulterner, Tinker, Clown of the Ocean, and Sea Rooster. The Canadian province Newfoundland and Labrador has declared it the provincial bird (similar to how in the United States there are state birds).

In the summer, during breeding season, the puffin's bill develops even more ridges and bony growth plates. Its crown is greyish-black. Its upper parts are dark. It has a narrow ashy collar. The sides of the head, the chin, and the throat are also ashy. The area between the eyes and the bill are nearly white, with a dark dusky patch on the side of its throat. The underparts, starting at the neck, are pur white. The puffin stands upright on its legs, which are pushed very far back on it body. It stands and waddles like a penguin does. The base of the bill and the first ridge are dull yellowish. The next space on the bill is grayish blue. The rest of the bill is vermilion, and yellow below. The iris is bluish white, and there are conical shaped projections above and behind the eye.

Submission + - How Team Obama tried to hack the election (nypost.com)

An anonymous reader writes: New revelations have surfaced that the Obama administration abused intelligence during the election by launching a massive domestic-spy campaign that included snooping on Trump officials.

The irony is mind-boggling: Targeting political opposition is long a technique of police states like Russia, which Team Obama has loudly condemned for allegedly using its own intelligence agencies to hack into our election.

The revelations, as well as testimony this week from former Obama intel officials, show the extent to which the Obama administration politicized and weaponized intelligence against Americans.

Thanks to Circa News, we now know the National Security Agency under President Barack Obama routinely violated privacy protections while snooping through foreign intercepts involving US citizens — and failed to disclose the breaches, prompting the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court a month before the election to rebuke administration officials.

The story concerns what’s known as “upstream” data collection under Section 702 of the Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Act, under which the NSA looks at the content of electronic communication. Upstream refers to intel scooped up about third parties: Person A sends Person B an e-mail mentioning Person C. Though Person C isn’t a party to the e-mail, his information will be scooped up and potentially used by the NSA.

Further, the number of NSA data searches about Americans mushroomed after Obama loosened rules for protecting such identities from government officials and thus the reporters they talk to.

The FISA court called it a “very serious Fourth Amendment issue” that NSA analysts — in violation of a 2011 rule change prohibiting officials from searching Americans’ information without a warrant — “had been conducting such queries in violation of that prohibition, with much greater frequency than had been previously disclosed to the Court.”

A number of those searches were made from the White House, and included private citizens working for the Trump campaign, some of whose identities were leaked to the media. The revelations earned a stern rebuke from the ACLU and from civil-liberties champion Sen. Rand Paul.

Submission + - Two of Montana's Three Congressional Reps Now Have Ties to Oracle (cnbc.com)

Marlin Schwanke writes: According to a CNBC report, Senator Steve Daines from Montana and newly elected Congressperson, Republican Greg Gianforte worked together for 12 years at a customer relationship management (CRM) software company called RightNow Technologies, which Oracle acquired in 2012 for $1.5 billion.

Submission + - On higher education, programmers and blue-collar job -- answer to Wired (mystudentvoices.com)

arielf writes: When I read “The new blue-collar job is coding” (https://www.wired.com/2017/02/programming-is-the-new-blue-collar-job) I felt that there was something wrong with such an idea. I have decided to write my own article in English. Although, it is still more about formal education than why programmers cannot be blue-collars, the second topic is covered as well.

Submission + - What its like to be struck by lightning (mosaicscience.com)

schwit1 writes: Lightning is responsible for more than 4,000 deaths worldwide annually – according to those documented in reports from 26 countries.

Only by piecing together the bystander reports, the singed clothing and the burnt skin can survivors start to construct their own picture of the possible trajectory of the electrical current, one that can approach 200 million volts and travel at one-third of the speed of light.

Submission + - The forgotten joys of the screen saver. (theparisreview.org)

Z00L00K writes: When I first encountered Jorge Luis Borges’s “The House of Asterion,” a short story whose narrator runs with madness through an endless labyrinth, a remote feeling of déjà vu eased into one of bizarre, welcome recognition. The house’s infinite doors, its emptiness, the dizzy futility—Borges seemed to be describing a popular screen saver from the nineties. Surely you know the one, the Windows maze, that redbrick warren of untold pivots summoned by the computer monitor when no one was around.

Submission + - Hackers Have Hit Both The Trump Organization And Democrat Election Data (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Two recent news stories give new prominence to politically-motivated data breaches. Friday the Wall Street Journal reported that last year Guccifer 2.0 sent 2.5 gigabytes of Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee election data to a Republican operative in Florida, including their critical voter turnout projections. At the same time ABC News is reporting that the FBI is investigating "an attempted overseas cyberattack against the Trump Organization," adding that such an atack would make his network a high priority for monitoring. "In the course of its investigation," they add, "the FBI could get access to the Trump Organization's computer network, meaning FBI agents could possibly find records connected to other investigations." A senior FBI official (now retired) concedes to ABC that "There could be stuff in there that they [the Trump organization] do not want to become part of a separate criminal investigation," Frankel said."

Submission + - Accused of Underpaying Women, Google Says It's Too Expensive To Get Wage Data (theguardian.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Google argued that it was too financially burdensome and logistically challenging to compile and hand over salary records that the government has requested, sparking a strong rebuke from the U.S. Department of Labor (DoL), which has accused the Silicon Valley firm of underpaying women. Google officials testified in federal court on Friday that it would have to spend up to 500 hours of work and $100,000 to comply with investigators’ ongoing demands for wage data that the DoL believes will help explain why the technology corporation appears to be systematically discriminating against women. Noting Google’s nearly $28bn annual income as one of the most profitable companies in the US, DoL attorney Ian Eliasoph scoffed at the company’s defense, saying, “Google would be able to absorb the cost as easy as a dry kitchen sponge could absorb a single drop of water.”

Submission + - Reid Hoffman, Bill Gates, Others Ante Up Another $30M to Change.org the World

theodp writes: FORTUNE reports that LinkedIn co-founder Reid Hoffman is leading a $30 million funding round in Change.org, a for-profit petition and fundraising website focused on social and political change. Joining Hoffman in this round, as well as an earlier $25 million round in 2014, is Bill Gates. Change.org, Hoffman explained in a Friday LinkedIn post, "helps enable a world where you don't need to hire a lobbyist to have real impact on the issues and policies that matter to you." He added, "In its decade of existence, Change.org petitions have resulted in more than 21,000 victories, i.e., instances in which a government agency, corporation, or other entity has changed a regulation or a policy in the face of a Change.org petition urging it to do so." Last year, Hoffman joined Gates and some of the biggest names in tech and corporate America who threw their weight behind a Change.org petition that tried to get Congress to fund K-12 Computer Science education. The Change.org petition fell short of its 150,000-signature goal despite claims of support from 90% of the parents of the nation's 58 million K-12 schoolchildren (based on a Google-funded survey of 1,685 parents), widespread press coverage (including a full-page ad in petition signer Jeff Bezos's Washington Post), lobbying efforts by the tech coalition that organized the petition (which counts LinkedIn and Microsoft among its members), and even some free PR from Change.org.

Submission + - Working Theory in Jet Crash: iPhone in Cockpit Is to Blame (newser.com)

schwit1 writes: Investigators still don't know what caused an EgyptAir jet to crash last year en route from Paris to Cairo, but they're seriously looking into the possibility that a co-pilot's iPhone or iPad Mini is to blame. The theory is that the co-pilot plugged the device into a socket not meant for such things, which eventually caused the lithium battery to explode and ignited a fire in the cockpit.

Submission + - After 10 Years FileZilla Adds Support for Master Password That Encrypts Logins (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Following years of criticism and user requests, the FileZilla FTP client is finally adding support for a master password that will act as a key for storing FTP login credentials in an encrypted format.This feature is scheduled to arrive in FileZilla 3.26.0, but you can use it now if you download the 3.26.0 (unstable) release candidate from here. By encrypting its saved FTP logins, FileZilla will finally thwart malware that scrapes the sitemanager.xml file and steals FTP credentials, which were previsouly stolen in plain text.

The move is extremely surprising, at least for the FileZilla userbase. Users have been requesting this feature for a decade, since 2007, and they have asked it many and many times since then. All their requests have fallen on deaf ears and met with refusal from FileZilla maintainer, Tim Kosse. In November 2016, a user frustrated with Koose's stance forked the FileZilla FTP client and added support for a master password via a spin-off app called FileZilla Secure.

Submission + - California moving forward with single payer healthcare, and no money (sacbee.com) 2

schwit1 writes: A California Senate committee tasked with reviewing bills that spend state money passed a $400 billion universal health care proposal Thursday with no funding plan.

The vote came days after the committee revealed the Legislature’s first cost assessment of the bill, which turns out to be more than the entire state budget for the year beginning July 1.

Submission + - Comcast Customer Satisfaction Drops 6% After TV Price Hikes, ACSI Says (arstechnica.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Comcast’s customer satisfaction score for subscription TV service fell 6 percent in a new survey, putting the company near the bottom of rankings published by the American Customer Satisfaction Index (ACSI). Comcast’s score fell from 62 to 58 on ACSI’s 100-point scale, a drop of more than 6 percent between 2016 and 2017. The ACSI’s 2017 report on telecommunications released this week attributed the decrease to “price hikes for Xfinity (Comcast) subscriptions.” Satisfaction with pay-TV providers dropped industry-wide, tying the segment with Internet service (a product offered by the same companies) for last place in the ACSI’s rankings. The ACSI summarized the trend as follows: "Customer satisfaction with subscription television service slips 1.5 percent to 64, tied with Internet service providers for last place among 43 industries tracked by the ACSI. Many of the same large companies offer service for Internet, television, and voice via bundling. The threat of competition from streaming services has done little to spur improvement for pay TV. Customer service remains poor, and cord-cutting continues to accelerate. More than half a million subscribers defected from cable and satellite TV providers during the first quarter of 2017—the largest loss in the history of the industry. Customers still prefer fiber optic and satellite to cable, putting FiOS (Verizon Communications) in first place with a 1 percent uptick to 71. AT&T takes the next two spots with its fiber optic and satellite services."

Submission + - Us Plans First Test Of ICBM Intercept, With North Korea in Mind (ap.org)

schwit1 writes: Preparing for North Korea's growing threat, the Pentagon will try to shoot down an intercontinental-range missile for the first time in a test next week. The goal is to more closely simulate a North Korean ICBM aimed at the U.S. homeland, officials said Friday

The American interceptor has a spotty track record, succeeding in nine of 17 attempts since 1999. The most recent test, in June 2014, was a success, but that followed three straight failures. The system has evolved from the multibillion-dollar effort triggered by President Ronald Reagan's 1983 push for a "Star Wars" solution to ballistic missile threats during the Cold War — when the Soviet Union was the only major worry.

Submission + - UCF Research Could Bring 'Drastically' Higher Resolution To Your Phone and TV (ucf.edu)

cinemetek writes: Researchers at the University of Central Florida have developed a new color changing surface tunable through electrical voltage that could lead to three times the resolution for televisions, smartphones and other devices.

Current LCD's are made up of hundreds of thousands of pixels that display different colors. With current technology, each of these pixels contain three subpixels – one red, one green, one blue.

UCF’s NanoScience Technology Center (Assistant Professor Debashis Chanda and physics doctoral student Daniel Franklin) have come up with a way to tune the color of these subpixels. By applying differing voltages, they are able to change the color of individual subpixels to red, green or blue – the RGB scale – or gradations in between.

By eliminating the three static subpixels that currently make up every pixel, the size of individual pixels can be reduced by three. Three times as many pixels means three times the resolution. That would have major implications for not only TVs and other general displays, but augmented reality and virtual reality headsets that need very high resolution because they’re so close to the eye.

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