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Submission + - Risk Of Cascadia Quake Elevated As Puget Sound 'Slow Slip' Event Begins (patch.com) 1

schwit1 writes: On Wednesday, the semi-annual "slow slip" event began, according to the Pacific Northwest Seismic Network (PNSN) at the University of Washington. The event happens about every 14 months deep underneath the Puget Sound area and is essentially a slow earthquake that takes place over the course of two weeks.

During a slow-slip event, after 14 months of moving eastward, the Juan de Fuca tectonic plate stalls and moves westward, which puts stress on the Cascadia subduction zone.

Seismologists often refer to this as a "straw that broke the camel's back" scenario.

"It's loading up the edge of the lock zone of the Cascadia subduction zone more rapidly than normal tectonic processes would do," explained Bill Steele, director of communications at the PNSN. "You're getting seven months of strain accumulation applied to the back edge of the fault over a week."

Submission + - Asking for: IPv6 tunnel provider over 4G/LTE

lenne writes: As my 4G/LTE does not provide IPv6, and the tunnel I have from Sixxs with AICCU/AYIYA does work, either because the provider filters it, my modem blocks it, or tunnelling doesn't work through 4G/LTE and double NAT, I'm looking for a VPN-provider which will give me an IPv6 subnet. I have access to a machine outside, with a single IPv6 address, but I can't get a subnet routed to it,so I could have made a tunnel myself.
I've asked a few VPN-providers, but nobody supplies IPv6.
The provider should be in Europe, preferably net-near Denmark.

Submission + - First victim of SHA-1 collisions: Subversion. Technique was reverse engineered

Artem Tashkinov writes: A WebKit developer who tried to upload "bad" PDF files generated from the first successful SHA-1 attack broke WebKit's SVN repository because Subversion uses SHA-1 hash to differentiate commits. The reason to upload the files was to create a test for checking cache poisoning in WebKit.

Another news story is that based on the theoretical incomplete description of the SHA-1 collision attack published by Google just two days ago, people have managed to recreate the attack in practice and now you can download a python script which can create a new PDF file with the same SHA-1 hashsum using your input PDF. The attack is also implemented as a website which can prepare two PDF files with different JPEG images which will result in the same hash sum.
User Journal

Journal + - Journal: Halting problem disproves deterministic universe?

If the universe were deterministic, then it must be possible to, given sufficient data about the universe and its current state, predict what the state of it will be at some point in the future. We shall confine our predictions for this purpose only to the outcome of a single experiment, and let us take a black box that can tell us what the outcome of the experiment will be. If such a black box cannot exist for any reason, then it follows that there are at least some factors in the univ

Submission + - HOW TO RUN A ROGUE GOVERNMENT TWITTER ACCOUNT WITH AN ANONYMOUS EMAIL ADDRESS AN (theintercept.com)

mspohr writes: How easy is it to create and maintain a Twitter account while preserving your anonymity â" even from Twitter and any law enforcement agency that may request its records? I tried to find out and documented all my steps. There are different ways to accomplish this. If you plan on following these steps, you should make sure you understand the purpose of them, in case you need to improvise. I also canâ(TM)t guarantee that these techniques will protect your anonymity â" there are countless ways that things can go wrong, many of them social rather than technical. But I hope youâ(TM)ll at least have a fighting chance at keeping your real identity private.

Submission + - Intel unofficially cuts prices for its x86 CPUs across the board 1

Artem Tashkinov writes: In an expected turn of events, now that AMD Ryzen is less than a week away from going public, Intel has unofficially cut prices for a long range of its CPUs. The biggest price cuts involve the following CPUs:
  • Intel Core i7-6850K, Broadwell, 3.6GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $700, now $550 (21% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6800K, Broadwell, 3.4GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $500, now $360 (28% off)
  • Intel Core i7-5820K, Haswell, 3.3GHz, 6 cores (with HT), LGA 2011-3, was $420, now $320 (24% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6700K, SkyLake, 4.0GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $400, now $260 (35% off)
  • Intel Core i7-6600K, SkyLake, 3.5GHz, 4 cores (with HT), LGA 1151, was $270, now $180 (33% off)

It's so good to finally have a competition in the x86 CPU market back after more than ten years since Intel released its Core 2 CPUs.

Submission + - MySQL Databases Targeted in New Ransom Attacks (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: After the ransacking of MongoDB, ElasticSearch, Hadoop, CouchDB, and Cassandra servers, attackers are now hijacking hundreds of MySQL databases, deleting their content, and leaving a ransom note behind asking for a 0.2 Bitcoin ($235) payment. Attackers are gaining access to databases by brute-forcing root accounts for Internet-exposed MySQL servers.

The attacks started on February 12, and only lasted for 30 hours, during which time attackers breached hundreds of servers. Investigators said all attacks came from the same IP address from the Netherlands, 109.236.88.20, belonging to a hosting company called WorldStream.

In some cases attackers dumped the database, in other cases they deleted all content and left a ransom note behind. Two ransom notes have been found in the hundreds of confirmed attacks, one asking victims to get in contact via email and confirm the payment, while the other used a completely different mode of operation, redirecting users to a Tor-hosted website. At the time of writing, the Tor website is still up and running, at http://sognd75g4isasu2v.onion/

Submission + - Women's life expectancy on track to hit 90 in some nations. (yahoo.com)

schwit1 writes: By 2030 life expectancy for South Korean women could top nine decades, an average lifespan long thought to be out of reach, researchers said Wednesday.

South Korea is not only the first country in the world where women may live past 90 on average, it is also the one on track to log the biggest jump in longevity, they reported in The Lancet medical journal.

Other developed countries are not far behind: the longevity of French and Japanese women are more likely than not to stretch past 88 years.

The men who could look forward to the longest lives in 2015 were in Switzerland, Iceland and Australia — all within a few decimal points of an 81 year lifespan.

Submission + - Researchers develop new solid hydrogen storage system (llnl.gov) 1

An anonymous reader writes: US National Lab researchers at Lawerence Livermore, Sandia, and the National Institute of Standards and Technology in collaboration with Mahidol University researchers, have successfully developed a new hydrogen storage system reliant on nanoscale sized Lithium Nitride materials (Li3N). Hydrogen power has been seen as a potentially valuable source of alternative, clean energy supplies but has faced difficulties due to its inherent safety issues in handling and storage.
The paper, “Nanointerface-driven reversible hydrogen storage in the nanoconfigured LI-N-H system,” published Thursday in the journal "Advanced Materials Interfaces," describes a new mechanism of hydrogen storage relying on the Li3N nanomaterials ability to store high quantities of solid hydrogen, without degradation and capable of recharging. Press release available in link, paper may be paywalled.

Submission + - White House blocks news organizations from press briefing (cnn.com)

ClickOnThis writes: CNN reports that it, along with several other major news organizations, were blocked from attending a press briefing at the White House today. From the article:

The New York Times, the Los Angeles Times, Politico and BuzzFeed were also excluded from the meeting, which is known as a gaggle and is less formal than the televised Q-and-A session in the White House briefing room. The gaggle was held by White House press secretary Sean Spicer.

In a brief statement defending the move, administration spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said the White House "had the pool there so everyone would be represented and get an update from us today."

The pool usually includes a representative from one television network and one print outlet. In this case, four of the five major television networks — NBC, ABC, CBS and Fox News — were invited and attended the meeting, while only CNN was blocked.

And while The New York Times was kept out, conservative media organizations Breitbart News, The Washington Times and One America News Network were also allowed in.


Submission + - Toshiba plans to ship a 1TB flash chip to manufacturers this spring (computerworld.com)

Lucas123 writes: Toshiba has begun shipping samples of its third-generation 3D NAND memory product, a chip with 64 stacked flash cells that it said will enable a 1TB chip it will ship this spring. The new flash memory product has 65% greater capacity than the previous generation technology, which used 48 layers of NAND flash cells. The chip will be used in data center and consumer SSD products. The technology announcement comes even as suitors are eyeing buying a majority share of the company's memory business. Along with a previous report about WD, Foxxcon, SK Hynix and Micron have now also thrown their hats in the ring to purchase a majority share in Toshiba's memory spin-off, according to a new report in the Nikkei's Asian Review.

Submission + - Professors claim passive cooling breakthrough via plastic film (economist.com)

charlesj68 writes: An article in the Economist discusses the development of a plastic film by two professors at the University of Colorado in Boulder that provides a passive cooling effect. The film contains embedded glass beads that absorb and emit infrared in a wavelength that is not blocked by the atmosphere. Combining this with half-silvering to keep the sun from being the source of infrared absorption on the part of the beads, and you have way of pumping heat at a claimed rate of 93 watts per square meter.
Actual paper in Science: http://science.sciencemag.org/...
Original research by others in Nature: http://www.nature.com/nature/j...

Submission + - World's Largest Spam Botnet Adds DDoS Feature (bleepingcomputer.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Necurs, the world's largest spam botnet with nearly five million infected bots, of which one million active each day, has added a new module that can be used for launching DDoS attacks. The sheer size of the Necurs botnet, even in its worst days, dwarfs all of today's IoT botnets, who barely managed to reach 400,000 (albeit the owner of that botnet has now been arrested).

If this new feature would ever to be used, a Necurs DDoS atack would easily break every DDoS record there is. Fortunately, no such attack has been seen until now. Until now, the Necurs botnet has been seen spreading the Dridex banking trojan and the Locky ransomware. According to industry experts, there's a low chance to see the Necurs botnet engage in DDoS attacks because the criminal group behind the botnet is already making too much money to risk exposing their full infrastructure in DDoS attacks.

Submission + - Security lapse exposed New York airport's critical servers for a year (zdnet.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A security lapse at a New York international airport left its server backups exposed on the open internet for almost a year, ZDNet has found.

Khalil Sehnaoui, founder of Krypton Security, and Brad "Renderman" Haines, a hacker and security researcher, analyzed the password file and a network schematic found among the files to determine the reach of a potential attacker.

"The password file would give us full access to every component of the internal network," said Sehnaoui.

But in the wrong hands, it could also be used to issue valid boarding passes to people on the "no-fly" list, a government watchlist that prevents possible terrorists from boarding flights, he said.

"You could access the database of travelers and know who is going where and when, and get a list of the passenger's data, such as names and passport numbers," said Haines.

Or, worst case scenario, hackers could shut down airport operations, stranding passengers on the ground, the researchers say.

Submission + - Malaysian Police: VX nerve gas killed N Korea leader's brother in airport attack (reuters.com)

An anonymous reader writes: Malaysian police have announced their finding that Kim Jong Nam, half-brother of North Korean leader Kim Jon Un, was killed by assassins using VX nerve gas in an attack in the busy Kuala Lumpur airport. Malaysian authorities plan to decontaminate the airport and other sites visited by the attackers. Police are holding the two female attackers, one of whom was affected by the chemical agent, as well as two other men. They are seeking seven more North Koreans connected to the case. VX is the most toxic of the nerve gasses and the UN has declared it a weapon of mass destruction. The manufacture and stockpiling of more than 100 grams of VX per year is prohibited by the Chemical Weapons Convention of 1993. It has no commercial uses. The Malaysian police are trying to discover if it was smuggled into their country, or manufactured there. The Malaysian government has recalled its ambassador to North Korea for consultation. North Korea is blaming the death of Kim Jong Nam on Malaysia. North Korea is believed to have major stockpiles of chemical weapons, and is alleged to conduct experiments on prisoners and social undesirables.

Submission + - Film studios seek to block Australians from acessing 41 pirate websites (computerworld.com.au)

angry tapir writes: A group of film studios is undertaking what is set to be the most significant use so far of Australia's anti-piracy laws, which allow rights holders to apply for court orders that can compel ISPs to block their customers from accessing certain piracy-linked sites. A pair of rights holders last year successfully obtained court orders forcing Australia's most popular ISPs to block a handful of sites including The Pirate Bay. Now Village Roadshow wants to have 41 more sites blocked

Submission + - AZ Bill Would Make Students in Grades 4-12 Participate Once In An Hour of Code

theodp writes: Christopher Silavong of Cronkite News reports: "A bill, introduced by [Arizona State] Sen. John Kavanagh, R-Fountain Hills, would mandate that public and charter schools provide one hour of coding instruction once between grades 4 to 12. Kavanagh said it’s critical for students to learn the language – even if it’s only one session – so they can better compete for jobs in today’s world. However, some legislators don’t believe a state mandate is the right approach. Senate Bill 1136 has passed the Senate, and it’s headed to the House of Representatives. Kavanagh said he was skeptical about coding and its role in the future. But he changed his mind after learning that major technology companies were having trouble finding domestic coders and talking with his son, who works at a tech company." According to the Bill, the instruction can "be offered by either a nationally recognized nonprofit organization [an accompanying Fact Sheet mentions tech-backed Code.org] that is devoted to expanding access to computer science or by an entity with expertise in providing instruction to pupils on interactive computer instruction that is aligned to the academic standards."

Submission + - Waymo is suing Uber for theft of LiDAR design for self-driving cars (electrek.co)

haruchai writes: Story on Electrek.co about Alphabet (Google) subsidiary Waymo accusing Uber of IP theft ,

Alphabet’s Waymo subsidiary has filed a lawsuit against Uber over the theft and replication of a key self-driving component. Former employees working on Google’s self-driving project allegedly stole information before leaving for a start-up that was purchased by Uber. "Recently, we received an unexpected email. One of our suppliers specializing in LiDAR components sent us an attachment (apparently inadvertently) of machine drawings of what was purported to be Uber’s LiDAR circuit board—except its design bore a striking resemblance to Waymo’s unique LiDAR design"


Submission + - The race for autonomous cars is over. Silicon Valley lost. (autoblog.com)

schwit1 writes: Up until very recently the talk in Silicon Valley was about how the tech industry was going to broom Detroit into the dustbin of history. Companies such as Apple, Google, and Uber — so the thinking went -were going to out run, out gun, and out innovate the automakers. Today that talk is starting to fade. There's a dawning realization that maybe there's a good reason why the traditional car companies have been around for more than a century.

Last year Apple laid off most of the engineers it hired to design its own car. Google (now Waymo) stopped talking about making its own car. And Uber, despite its sky high market valuation, is still a long, long way from ever making any money, much less making its own autonomous cars.

To paraphrase Elon Musk, Silicon Valley is learning that "Making rockets is hard, but making cars is really hard." People outside of the auto industry tend to have a shallow understanding of how complex the business really is. They think all you have to do is design a car and start making it. But most startups never make it past the concept car stage because the move to mass production proves too daunting.

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