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The recent snow on the U.S. east coast ...

Displaying poll results.
Affected me quite a bit -- power outages or worse
  1177 votes / 4%
Affected me personally, but nothing major
  2593 votes / 10%
Made me glad to live someplace else
  6693 votes / 28%
Made me sorry to live someplace else
  2245 votes / 9%
Didn't make my local news. Snow, you say?
  10926 votes / 46%
23634 total votes.
[ Voting Booth | Other Polls | Back Home ]
  • Don't complain about lack of options. You've got to pick a few when you do multiple choice. Those are the breaks.
  • Feel free to suggest poll ideas if you're feeling creative. I'd strongly suggest reading the past polls first.
  • This whole thing is wildly inaccurate. Rounding errors, ballot stuffers, dynamic IPs, firewalls. If you're using these numbers to do anything important, you're insane.
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The recent snow on the U.S. east coast ...

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  • by txoof (553270) on Monday October 31, 2011 @01:01AM (#37891662) Homepage

    I spent the weekend at a family reunion in the north west of The Netherlands at a vacation home with no interwebs. This is the first I've heard of the snowpocalypse. I find it rather amusing that the /. pole informed me before any other source. It wasn't even a news headline. I had to vote "Didn't make my local news." because it didn't make the Dutch radio news while I was driving...

    • Try living in Australia at the moment, nothing makes the news past the grounding of QANTAS. The news coverage reminds me of 9/11 in some ways, it's on every channel all of the time and 8-10 pages at the front of every newspaper.
      • by mjwx (966435)

        Try living in Australia at the moment, nothing makes the news past the grounding of QANTAS. The news coverage reminds me of 9/11 in some ways, it's on every channel all of the time and 8-10 pages at the front of every newspaper.

        Kind of why I haven't bought a newspaper in over a decade.

        Print media is dying.

    • by RogerWilco (99615)

      I spent the weekend at a family reunion in the north west of The Netherlands at a vacation home with no interwebs. This is the first I've heard of the snowpocalypse. I find it rather amusing that the /. pole informed me before any other source. It wasn't even a news headline. I had to vote "Didn't make my local news." because it didn't make the Dutch radio news while I was driving...

      Yeah, I live in the Netherlands as well. First I've heard of it too.

    • You only heard about it on /.??

      Man... my friends were all over the phone, web, and even rang my doorbell: "Dude, there's a blizzard in the USA, and some people are without electricity! Turn on your TV, go online! Can't miss this! It's the event of the century!" .... Ok, serious now: I didn't hear about it until this poll either.

  • by DWMorse (1816016)

    I'm from Minnesnowta. You want snow? Talk to me in 3 months when I can't see my next-door neighbors house 30 feet away because of the walls of snow drifts.

    Haven't had a power outage in years here, either - what're you all doing so wrong with your electrical grid that some frozen water flakes mess it up, hmm? ;)

    • by artor3 (1344997)

      I'm from upstate NY. Believe me, Minnesota's got nothing on us. You see, we've got this nifty thing called "lake effect" snow, which basically means that the Great Lakes relocate on to our roofs and roads every winter. Several areas average 10+ feet of snow each year, and even the more hospitable areas average 6 feet. The record currently stands at over 35 feet, set back in the 70s. And remember, that's the average depth. Drifts are much taller.

      This particular storm was nothing. Barely more than a fo

      • I'm from the Sierra Nevada of Northern California. Upstate New York has nothing on us. You see, we've got this nifty thing called "The Pacific Ocean" to the west of us, and every winter the jet stream pulls tropical storms from Hawaii over us. So you get the volume of precipitation of a tropical storm, falling in the form of snow. A snowicane. (Snowphoon?)

        Having also lived in Minnesota, however, I will grant that when you get 6 inches of snow in Minnesota, it's not going anywhere until Februrary or March. I

        • I will grant that when you get 6 inches of snow in Minnesota, it's not going anywhere until Februrary or March

          Or in the case of this year June. The snow pile at the end of the parking ramp here at my work took until June 3rd to finally melt.

          • by mldi (1598123)

            I will grant that when you get 6 inches of snow in Minnesota, it's not going anywhere until Februrary or March

            Or in the case of this year June. The snow pile at the end of the parking ramp here at my work took until June 3rd to finally melt.

            Late northern region snow melts was actually part of the problem with the Missouri River flooding, or am I wrong?

        • Luxury (Score:4, Funny)

          by mjwx (966435) on Tuesday November 01, 2011 @02:06AM (#37904614)
          I live in Perth, Western Australia. Our winters are between 10 and 30 Degrees C. But in a few weeks we'll be living in 40 Degree's C with little wind and no chance of rain. This does not stop until sometime in May or June. It will probably be more like July this year (thanks La Nina).

          Kids these days, complaining about the snow. Send some of it down here ya blasted ingrates.
          • by cupantae (1304123)

            Kids these days, complaining about the snow. Send some of it down here ya blasted ingrates.

            I would suggest that to say that is like me complaining that I've never even seen a dingo, when one has just taken your baby.
            But then, what would a kid like me know?

      • There are parts of our state the get plenty of lake effect snow (north shore) and other parts where it just blows across the open prairie (south western part of the state). Granted there are few places that have 10 feet of snow cover each year, but we in Minnesota also get the nice cold that people in the north east don't get. We can go around all day with people getting in a pissing contest of who has the worst winter weather (you will probably loose unless you are stationed at the Mt. Washington observato [slashdot.org]
        • Have you been to the north east? NY? CT? MA? NJ? We have trees. Lots of trees. The tree huggers in some towns won't even let you cut a tree in your own yard without their permission first. Now add in overhead power/telco/cable located along the roadways and within feet of... trees.. lots of them. And south of VT/NH, with most of their leaves still on. Now add 6-20" of just barely snow. Heck some of those power lines probably came down on their own. Then factor in that the north east is probably t

        • by mcmonkey (96054)

          how shoddy is your infrastructure where there are massive power outages from some snow.

          This point has been elsewhere, but as a point of illustration, I was driving around 6:30 - 7 PM Saturday, after it started snowing a bit before 5 in my area. Branches of trees along the road were scratching the roof of my car (regular height sedan).

          I've driven down the same roads during and after storms where the snowfall was measured in feet, and never before have branches come even close to my car (unless they had fallen and I was driving over them). Here the trees were bent over after little more than a

      • by Andy Dodd (701)

        I'm from Central NY - traditionally, we get a small portion of the lake effect fun, which is still a fairly decent amount of snow.

        However, for the past few years, the snow seems to be shooting south to areas not as accustomed to it.

        Go figure - a few years ago I bought a pair of snowshoes. We've barely had a single decent snowstorm since then, while my parents in New Jersey keep getting great snowshoeing weather - but they don't snowshoe. (They do, however, enjoy these storms for cross-country skiing.)

      • by mldi (1598123)
        Depends where in Minnesota you're talking about :) Minnesota has Lake Superior to worry about. Though, the worst snow I've ever personally witnessed from the great lake effect has been in Michigan. Maybe it has something to do with being nestled in between or something. I don't know, I'm not a meteorologist. But back to Minnesota... pretty much the entire state gets a shit ton (like most of the other midwest states).
    • by Xugumad (39311)

      I've considered moving to Minnesota before, even after I had achieved a complete understanding of what the weather like. That's a sign I'm insane, right?

      • by Andy Dodd (701)

        Perhaps just a sign that you like to ski/snowshoe/ice skate.

      • Was that a complete understanding of the winter weather, the summer weather, or both? If you like hot and muggy [startribune.com] and also like cold and dry Minnesota is the place. Personally I like the cold and dry weather, so I am fine for about 9 months here it is just the other 3 that suck. Besides if you live in Minnesota you can wear that as a badge and impress people as most people think Minnesota is just like Alaska and believe both to be frozen waste lands.
        • by Xugumad (39311)

          I suppose mostly winter; I've visited in late summer and am aware it gets much hotter, but I would struggle to tell you _how_ much hotter.

          I was specifically looking at Minneapolis, and suspect living in a fair sized city also is quite different to being further out! Still, it's a really nice state, from what I've seen, and the frozen wasteland impressions help keep house prices low :)

      • by mldi (1598123)
        Extreme weather aside (in both Summer and Winter), if you're an outdoorsman, Minnesota is just about the perfect place to move to. It's absolutely covered in natural, beautiful lakes and hunting grounds.
    • Re:Yawn (Score:5, Informative)

      by mcmonkey (96054) on Monday October 31, 2011 @09:10AM (#37894202) Homepage

      I'm from Minnesnowta. You want snow? Talk to me in 3 months when I can't see my next-door neighbors house 30 feet away because of the walls of snow drifts.

      Haven't had a power outage in years here, either - what're you all doing so wrong with your electrical grid that some frozen water flakes mess it up, hmm? ;)

      This issue is not the amount of snow. The issue is timing.

      This same storm 3 months from now wouldn't be note-worthy. This storm now, before the leaves have fallen, is news because those leaves gather more snow than bare branches, causing more downed trees, power outages, etc.

      • This. I am one of those who was severely affected. Currently no power (not expecting fix for at least a weak) and I now have a 20 ft. branch speared through my roof. Luckily in hit the part of the roof that overhangs, so it didn't breach the actual inside of the house, but it will require immediate repair. But I digress. I live in NJ and we have our fair share of snowstorms. Nothing like MN, but the last two winters brought us plenty of multi-foot snow storms. No major power outages. The only inconv
    • I think this is news because it's snowing in places that normally are fit for human habitation...
    • by Ken_g6 (775014)

      I'm from Colorado. We've had two 1-foot snowstorms already. (They melted pretty quick too.) Snow on Halloween is kind of a tradition; sadly, we didn't get any this year.

    • You know you get snow when you have a have to have a door on the second floor because the first floor door gets snowed in.
  • if it didnt happen in the north east, cali, or tx...it didnt happen

  • This poll just screams for four yorkshiremen sketch replys.

    "That's nothing - we get 250 ft. of snow every day. We have to start digging our way to work two hours before we get home" and so on and so on.

    • by JustOK (667959)

      You have jobs?

    • by mjwx (966435)

      This poll just screams for four yorkshiremen sketch replys.

      "That's nothing - we get 250 ft. of snow every day. We have to start digging our way to work two hours before we get home" and so on and so on.

      Already started [slashdot.org].

      • Yeah, but those don't follow in the Four Yorkshiremen spirit - those replies being (presumably) factual and all :) I found the one-upmanship in that thread amusing, but it's not Four Yorkshiremen.

  • Saw snow, but it's already melted.
  • Not everyone despises snow. In fact, some of us who live in the North East do so by choice, and love snow.

    I took my kids out for a snowball fight early Saturday morning. This wet snow is perfect packing snow, and we had a blast!

  • by smooth wombat (796938) on Monday October 31, 2011 @08:36AM (#37893832) Homepage Journal

    is because this is some of the earliest snow, EVER, for the northeast, the amount of snow (3" - 22") and it was the heavy, wet kind which is worse than regular, powdery snow because it brings down branches which are several inches thick or entire trees.

    How heavy is the snow? Imagine someone putting 3 - 4 gallon jugs of water on the end of your snow shovel and trying to toss the stuff. You get tired very quickly. Even shoveling small amounts is tiring because of the weight.

    As to bringing down branches and trees, I helped my dad clear the collected snow off tree branches from around his house to prevent them from snapping. In fact, some of the branches, which you can normally walk under with ease, were all but lying on the ground from the weight of the snow on them. Once the snow was removed they bounced right back to where they should have been.

    While doing this, we both heard and watched as branches from pine trees in other peoples yards snap and crack off.

    York, PA was on CNN showing the effects. One guy had a large branch (4" diameter) fall on to his windshield while driving. I saw in Yonkers, NY, a tree came down and destroyed both the guys truck and took out half his house. I heard of similar situations around me.

    That's the reason this made news. It is out of the ordinary, the amount was very significant and the damage it caused. My local power company said the amount of damage from this storm was worse than when Irene came through early this year.

    Sure, Buffalo and Erie get more, Minnesota likes to brag about the amount they get because they have nothing else to talk about during the winter, but this is newsworthy because it's one of those odd occurrences.

    • by Dunega (901960)
      Don't forget to mention that a vast majority of the trees had yet to lose their leaves. This compounded the issue by allowing the snow to collect even more heavily on the branches. In Connecticut at least there are five times more trees down than there were for hurricane Irene.

      So, yes, New England gets snow, it doesn't surprise us, even when it's a month earlier than usual. What doesn't usually happen is that the trees didn't bother dropping their leaves in time to save themselves. :)
    • by hedwards (940851)

      Early? It's near the end of October, I remember a few years back getting snow in July, granted not much, but we are well into the Northern hemisphere so it was somewhat confusing.

  • by Lumpy (12016) on Monday October 31, 2011 @09:17AM (#37894288) Homepage

    I already have idiots here at work pointing at it as proof that Global warming does not exist.

    But then I point at them as proof that higher education does not mean you are smart.

    • by rlp (11898)
      Absolutely right! Remember:
      • Hurricanes
      • Tornadoes
      • Heat waves
      • Flooding
      • Tsunami
      • Earthquakes

      are all proof of human caused global warming. Whereas ...

      • Mild weather
      • Blizzards
      • Extreme cold

      mean nothing.

      • by H0p313ss (811249)

        ... then I point at them as proof that higher education does not mean you are smart.

      • The fact that you find that argument even remotely convincing says everything. Please, go read a book and inform yourself before you go spouting your nonsense all over the Internet.
    • by black3d (1648913)

      On the other hand, Global Warming pundits attribute every weather pattern that occurs, to global warming.

      Snowing? Global warming.
      Heat wave? Global warming.
      Mild summer day? Global warming.
      "Heat Index" saying the temperature feels hotter than it's ever *actually* been? Global warming.
      Rough seas? Global warming.
      Calm seas? Global warming.
      Icy seas? Global warming.
      Forest fire? Global warming.
      Floods? Global warming.

      I've read one pundit attributing the Japanese earthquake to global warming due to reduced salinity f

    • This is why I have thought for a long time that calling it global warming (even though that is what it is) and not climate change is a big mistake. The average person is really, really bad at looking at things from a global perspective and even worse that recognizing that personal anecdotal evidence != real evidence. Yes, global warming is happening. This does not mean that we can expect to be wearing t-shirts in January in Montreal any time soon. An overall temperature change of just a few degrees can have
  • I chose "made me sorry to live somewhere else", which is saying a lot since I use to live in the Northeast and never looked back when I moved south. Now I have three horses and dealing with my second season of drought. I watch as low after low passes us by and dumps moisture on the poor soggy folks up north. I'm no scientist (just an under appreciated software developer), but in the five years I've lived in the south it has gotten hotter and drier while my old stomping grounds begin to resemble bogs. Wh

    • by roothog (635998)

      Overhead wires are vulnerable to ice and snow. Underground wires are vulnerable to a hick with a backhoe. Putting wires in the ground isn't an obvious win.

      • by Bucc5062 (856482)

        A valid point, but given there are a number of areas with underground wires, gas and water pipes, we do not see themn drop out 4M customers in one dig. Yes, some lady in and eastern bloc county took out their whole internet connection, but its rare.

        I'd take my chances Redneck vs Storm. The yahoo with the backhoe can be discovered and fined, the storm? Can't sue Mother Nature. I've been through two moments where winter ice and spring storms took out my power from 1 to 9 days. I did not get a deduction f

  • Longmont, Colorado, specifically. Where 4 inches of snow last week knocked my power out for a day and a half. Fuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuck!

    When I bought my new house I thought it would be nice to have a standby generator now that I'm a homeowner and all that. I'd put it on the "Something to consider in 3-5 years." Now it's on my "Next major purchase once the car's paid off" list.

  • Friday night, it was forecasting an inch Saturday afternoon, and another 1-3 Saturday night.

    Saturday morning, this had been upped to 2-4, and we could see the storm beginning to creep slowly and inexorably toward us.

    By 5PM Saturday, though, we could see the bulk of the storm passing by to the south—looking at the map, the snow looked like it ended no more than about 20 miles southeast of us.

    Dan Aris

  • ...nothing happened.

    However, 30 miles away they got zapped.

  • We got 5 inches of snow here in Virginia, but I wasn't affected in any way. I guess I don't get to vote in this poll.

  • another reason to scream "WATCH OUR NEWSCAST", "OUR WEATHER EXPERTS ARE BETTER THAN THEIRS", yada yada, yada. Living in Southern NJ, we had a few wet flakes fall, and cold weather for the weekend. Seriously people, just use common sense and you'll be fine. A Jeep doesn't make you invincible, slow down when it's wet and cold, don't go to the grocery store/gas station the day before snowpocalypse and don't rely on the utility companies to actually have enough crews to deal with outages on a timely basis an
  • The weather didn't make me glad to leave NYC. Looking at my most recent paystub did.

  • We had 9" of snow in Hershey and it was really wet and heavy. Lots of tree branches came down, since they still have leaves, and crews are still cleaning branches up today. There were some major accidents with deaths due to trees on the road, as well. I stayed home. Lost power for 8 hours, but otherwise, no big deal for me. I did get to shovel snow already this year.
    • by H0p313ss (811249)

      There were some major accidents with deaths due to trees on the road...

      I am mystified by this, I've been in Canada for over 40 years and believe me we have lots of both trees and snow.

      What are the trees doing? Jumping on cars as they pass by?

      Or are people so stupid that they drive with all season tires as if it were simply raining?

      • by danbuter (2019760)
        At least one was someone driving at night. Not sure if they swerved to miss the tree and hit something else or if the tree was big enough to do them in. The news report didn't say, just that a tree on the road caused the accident.
  • This affected me personally; the current Questionable Content storyline is being delayed!

  • Dire predictions on Friday for the areas west of the I-95 corridor of up to 7 inches of White Death from Above prompted me to get my snow tractor (an ancient Cub Cadet with a blade) ready to go, so I spent Friday evening wrestling and bolting on the plow, then strapping a set of rusty tire chains onto my spare set of wheels, then discovering that the battery was dead. I got it all together, and with a battery borrowed from my sprayer, I made a victory lap Saturday afternoon, pushing almost an inch of quickl

  • Makes me glad to live at the other end of Interstate 90 from there.

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

 



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