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Comment Re:Infrastructure (Score 1) 287

What makes you think computers can't see the signs marking detours? It's perfectly within the possibilities of current OCR technology; in fact, there have been usable implementation of road sign processing for years.

Same for changed traffic pattern, especially if there's more than one autonomous car in the zone (since they can communicate in ways that humans can't).

They even understand the policeman who waves at them.

Yeah, and so can an Xbox with a $100 addon. It's really not that hard nowadays to track and recognize those kinds of movements.

Comment Re:So... no separation between system and userspac (Score 1) 335

Hum, in most large deployments, the databases are not even in the same machine, let alone VM, as the web server. This is the only way to ensure you can scale (adding more web servers dynamically) and optimize the systems for their workloads.

For example, see the Stack Overflow architecture: http://blog.serverfault.com/2011/09/

Frankly, if you're running the RDBMS on the same server as the web service, you're - like me - running a toy database.

Comment Re:And this is impressive why? (Score 1) 114

Well, as I said, with OpenID the providers knows exactly what sites you logged in to, while with Persona they just sign a certificate your browser gives them, vouching for your identity, without getting the site.

In terms of UI, Persona uses email addresses instead of URLs, which are easier for non-techies to grasp as an authentication identifier.

Comment Re:And this is impressive why? (Score 2) 114

Persona only needs a "middle man" if the domain you use doesn't support it natively. It's a fallback, not a requirement.

If you used a provider that supported Persona natively, not only you wouldn't need Mozilla as the middle man, as (unlike with OpenID), that same provider wouldn't know where you were logging in to.

Comment Re:antiquated system (Score 1) 116

The problem with Bitcoin (and blockchain based currencies) is that they don't really deal well with microtransactions. Since each transaction has to be sent and confirmed by a bunch of nodes, they impose a lot of strain on the miners. Eventually we should see rising transaction fees, which will probably kill such systems.

You've been Berkeley'ed!