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YouTube Stays Relevant Despite Pulled Content 279

Posted by Zonk
from the tube-is-all-things-to-all-people dept.
Gray writes "École Secondaire Mont-Bleu has banned all personal electronic devices and suspended two 13-year-old girls after one uploaded to YouTube a camera phone video of their teacher yelling at the other. After the video was posted on the popular internet video site, the teacher was so embarrassed that he stayed home from work, where he remains on stress leave. The teachers' union is now trying to get all personal electronic devices banned from all schools in Western Quebec." Meanwhile, via the PVRBlog comes word that YouTube has helped raise CBS' ratings by some 7-9%. From that article: "CBS has uploaded more than 300 clips that have a total of 29.2 million views on YouTube, averaging 857,000 views per day, since the service launched on October 18. CBS has three of the top 25 most viewed videos this month (Nov.1-17), including clips from CBS's Tuesday night hit drama 'NCIS,' 'Late Show with David Letterman,' 'The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson' and 'The Early Show.' The CBS Brand Channel is also one of the most subscribed channels of all time with more than 20,000 users subscribing to CBS programming on YouTube since the channel launch last month."
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YouTube Stays Relevant Despite Pulled Content

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  • by NightWulf (672561) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:39PM (#16979234)
    One is the fact that kids were recording what was going on privately, i.e. these two teachers fighting. Sure one can argue it was done in public, but still. This is a new world, where even the average joe can feel like a famous actor, where any little flub or stupid act they do can be recoreded by 500 people with camera phones, and uploaded to millions of viewers in a few minutes. It used to be you needed to be someone important to be embarassed by millions, now you just need to be in the unfortunate position of being around a cell phone.

    As for CBS, good for them. I would rather have an entire episode of a show, with commercials on youtube in a good resolution then to have to watch it on TV, or be forced to record it via dvr, etc.
    • by just_another_sean (919159) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:42PM (#16979260) Homepage Journal
      It wasn't two teachers fighting, it was a teacher yelling at a 13 year old kid. The other 13 year old recorded it and put it on youtube. Depending on why exactly he was yelling, and there aren't many good reasons, he probably should be embarassed.

      IMHO yelling at a kid just teaches a kid how to yell.
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by pimpimpim (811140)
        Actually, that is what the ban makes upsetting. It would be good to ban phones in class because the constant beeping will distort the order, I can completely understand that. But it should not be banned for the reason that stupid behaviour of the teacher could get public. Just for comparison, in Germany there is a website "rate-my-professor", and several college professors have asked via court that their entry is removed there. This is of course rather questionable, if they are underperforming, they should
    • by Channard (693317) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:43PM (#16979278) Journal
      The Slashdot article may be ambiguous, but the actual article it links to makes clear it was the teacher yelling at a student, not two teachers yelling at each other.
    • I can't understand why there aren't A/V cameras in every classroom.
      • by mikael (484)
        There was a school in Glasgow which wanted to do this - but the parents object because they feared it might damage the career prospescts of their offspring.
    • by vertinox (846076)
      One is the fact that kids were recording what was going on privately, i.e. these two teachers fighting. Sure one can argue it was done in public, but still.

      Not only was it in public, but they are technically public servants employed by the government.

      Any actions, words, or behavior you do on or off the job is and will be scrutinized.

      Of course whether this is a good thing or bad thing depends on the person.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:42PM (#16979264)
    Main Entry: relevant
    Pronunciation: 're-l&-v&nt

    Really earning your pay, aren't you, editors

    What, Linux doesn't have spell check?
  • by airos4 (82561) * <changer4NO@SPAMgmail.com> on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:43PM (#16979274) Homepage
    And how many times did you ever go home and tell a parent about how a teacher treated you, and get ignored or dismissed with "They wouldn't do that."

    Personally? As much as I'm against the Big Brother society, I'm amused that someone is so scared of how he could be portrayed by an objective viewfinder. And he'll tell us all about how the context isn't there, but there's no good reason why a teacher should be yelling and carrying on to the point where it looks good on video. There's other more effective ways to reach people, and if you can't figure one of them out then there are other career paths.
    • by El Cubano (631386) <roberto.connexer@com> on Friday November 24, 2006 @08:15PM (#16979536) Homepage

      And how many times did you ever go home and tell a parent about how a teacher treated you, and get ignored or dismissed with "They wouldn't do that."

      And how many times have schools contacted parents or called them to a parent teacher conference to tell of some misbehavior by their child, only to have the parents say "that's not possible, my little angel would never do that and if you try and discipline him/her for it, we'll sue"? Now, if the teacher tried to record the little monsters (even for the teacher's own protection and to have proof of the act), the parents would be completely livid. Lawsuits would be flying and we would all be screaming about "The Man" trying to oppress the students.

      I too am against a Big Brother society, but I think we are already getting there. The problem is that Big Brother is not the government, but rather any knucklehead with some sort of recording device. Personally, I think those kids should be treated the same way a teacher at that school would have been for similarly recording an altercation instigated by a student toward a teacher.

      I absolutely despise teachers' unions. I think that they have done more to damage the quality of education in the industrialized world than any other force. However, it is abundantly clear that this teacher needs the full backing of the union. More than anything, kids today need to learn respect for authority. This doesn't mean that authority is always right or infallible, just that kids should be taught to respect and that there are proper channels in which to handle grievances (i.e., posting to youtube is not the proper channel).

      • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Anonymous Coward
        "I think those kids should be treated the same way a teacher at that school would have been for similarly recording an altercation instigated by a student toward a teacher"

        You hold 13 year olds to the same standards as teachers?
        • by Artifakt (700173)
          Worse than that. Poster is not just advocating the same standards, but the same penalties. I could agree with holding 13 year olds to adult standards on some things, particularly behavior they really should have outgrown by the time they were six, but what's with the idea of automatically using penalties as severe as we would impose for adults?
      • by Hizonner (38491) on Friday November 24, 2006 @08:45PM (#16979794)

        I too am against a Big Brother society, but I think we are already getting there. The problem is that Big Brother is not the government, but rather any knucklehead with some sort of recording device.

        If that's Big Brother, I think I'm probably for it. The problem with surveillance has always been that one side, the "authority" side, has always had a recording. If that recording was favorable to authority's version of events, it could be released. If it was unfavorable, it could be buried. The imbalance invites abuse.

        I would be against a system where only the student had a recording. I wouldn't be as much against it as I would be against a system where only the teacher had a recording, because the teacher is already in a position of great power, but I'd still be against it. I might very well be in favor of a system where everybody had, or at least might have, a recording of everything, all the time.

        Yeah, that would mean that there'd be embarrassing footage of all of us, because we've all done stupid things we're not proud of. Maybe it wouldn't be such a big deal, though... it's kind of hard to come down too hard on Joe for his filmed mistakes, when he can dredge up yours. On the other hand, if somebody has a pattern of behavior, it becomes pretty hard to hide it.

        Such a system might be too hard on people, too stressful to live with, too unforgiving of the human need to get away with something once in a while. I'd especially be worried about people getting destroyed over the witch-hunt of the week.

        It might also be an improvement over what we have now. The case isn't open and shut... and one could actually do reasonable research to perhaps predict the effects, rather than just having everybody yell about "privacy" like that automatically trumped everything else.

        More than anything, kids today need to learn respect for authority. This doesn't mean that authority is always right or infallible, just that kids should be taught to respect and that there are proper channels in which to handle grievances (i.e., posting to youtube is not the proper channel).

        Why? What's so special about authority that it deserves this mystical respect you're calling for? Obviously, people in authority are often right about a lot of things (as well as often being wrong). That doesn't mean they should get an iota more consideration than everybody else. Arguably they should get less slack, since they're in a position to abuse their authority.

      • by geekoid (135745)
        most parents I know would welcome a class room being video taped.

        The teachers union, not so much.

        Film the class, store the video in case it is needed, destroy the video at the end of the year.

      • by dircha (893383) on Friday November 24, 2006 @08:53PM (#16979850)
        Wake up, buddy. These are public employees. These are the people to who we have committed one of the most fundamental and important roles in our society: teaching the next generation. In many cases these teachers are more important in shaping the future of our society than are parents themselves.

        You better believe we need to hold these people to the highest level of accountability.

        And you know what? Teachers unions should be happy we are doing this. As we weed out the scum and the freeloaders who are negatively impacting our children, we will raise the standards in the teaching profession and hopefully thereby raise the wages of teachers to reflect the fundamental and critical role they play in our society and our future.
        • by gregorio (520049)

          And you know what? Teachers unions should be happy we are doing this. As we weed out the scum and the freeloaders who are negatively impacting our children, we will raise the standards in the teaching profession and hopefully thereby raise the wages of teachers to reflect the fundamental and critical role they play in our society and our future.

          Except that all unions are administrated by the "scum and freeloaders" group. That's what unions are all about, defending the right of not working properly.

      • More than anything, kids today need to learn respect for authority.

        No. More than anything, kids need to respect others on an individual basis because they are a person too rather than respect because they are an authoritarian figure.

        In fact kids should question authority, and respect only the person because they are their equal and that all human beings need to be respected.

        When you talk of authority, you start getting into master and slave arguments.

        And I for one believe men are created equal and needed to
    • How much annoying little niggling crap do teachers have to take from students as well? If you've got the situation where kids are provoking teachers into having arguments and then putting it on the web, lets have it both ways then - put cameras all around the schools and you solve so much potential issues in terms of classroom disruption.
  • Misleading Summary (Score:5, Insightful)

    by TubeSteak (669689) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:44PM (#16979284) Journal
    FTFA: the incident took place a month ago, when one student provoked the teacher into yelling at her while a classmate secretly taped the confrontation.

    As Admiral Akbar once said: It's a trap. TFA also mentions that the exact same thing happened at another school in Canada.

    We all know how easily video can be creatively edited & pictures can be photoshopped... so short of banning camera phones & (video) cameras, I don't really see how you resolve the issue.
    • by Ruff_ilb (769396) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:53PM (#16979366) Homepage
      Um, you can always ask other teachers/students in the given situation what was going on. Heck, someone can always press charges and the justice system would take care of it. It would probably set a precedent either way discouraging the use of these phones.
    • by Bent Mind (853241)
      Ignore it. It's big right now because it's relativity new. In time it will be old news and no one will believe video downloaded from the net.

      On the other hand, most of the schools I know already ban cell phones. A student shouldn't be taking calls when they are in lecture, or passing notes (electronic or traditional) for that matter.
    • by JMZero (449047)
      A great deal of "real" journalism is done in pretty much the same way. These kids have just re-appropriated standard "Channel 7 Consumer Protection Patrol" (or even 60 Minutes) tactics.
    • by bigdavex (155746)
      If the teacher made an appropriate response to the provocation, the video wouldn't show anything embarrassing.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Rudisaurus (675580)
      We all know how easily video can be creatively edited & pictures can be photoshopped... so short of banning camera phones & (video) cameras, I don't really see how you resolve the issue.
      How about ... not yelling at students?

      How about behaving with a certain decorum and a degree of self-control?

      How about always behaving as if you are on public display?

      See? No problem!
      • by TubeSteak (669689)
        How about ... not yelling at students?

        How about behaving with a certain decorum and a degree of self-control?
        Oh please.

        Everyone you've ever known in your entire life has been provoked into yelling and/or lashing out.

        Children, in particular, are especially cruel when it comes to inciting such behavior, though most of them grow up and desist from what would otherwise be considered sociopathic or sadistic.
      • "How about ... not yelling at students?"

        Heh. I like how you bolded that. What happened to decorum and self-control?
    • by dircha (893383)
      The context is irrelevant.

      If the teacher feels that it is shameful to be yelling like this then the teacher should not have done it. This teacher - many teachers - seem to think that their students are some kind of sub-people, to and in front of whom otherwise shameful behavior has no consequences. This is a public employee in a public building operating in a public employee's capacity. This behavior is unacceptable. This attitude is unacceptable. It is as unacceptable as it is in another context for a poli
    • As Admiral Akbar once said: It's a trap.

      Well, if it is a trap then is is a big black bear trap in plain site. The camera may have been hidden but if a student is trying to goad you on then shouldn't it be obvious to a teacher what the appropriate action is? Getting into an hysterical screaming match with someone who is provoking you is something children do, or drunken pub crawlers, or white trash guests on Jerry Springer. Mature adults in positions of authority do not act this way and shouldn't have to
    • I really don't think teachers should be yelling at students, baited or not.

      Like the Rodney King video, while you can leave out preceeding video, I really don't think that video captured from a cell phone is easy to edit such that segments can be removed from the middle and not be noticible. For handheld video capture, the phone shakes so much that it's hard to sync that up well with human movement and not have the segments be noticible.
    • by geekoid (135745)
      If a teacher can be provoked by a student, they shouldn't be teaching. It goes on in every class room, all the time.

      • by J Story (30227)
        Is a teacher a baby-sitter, or a prison guard?

        I wonder why a teacher feels he needs to get all worked up about maintaining discipline in a class. Are they not allowed to dis-invite a student from the class? It seems to me that the problem quickly goes away if a teacher sets high standards of behaviour and then follows through by expelling anyone who falls short.

        If a student is creating a disturbance, he likely is not going to learn anything from the lesson plan. Why should one student be allowed to sabotage
        • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

          Yes, Yes, and no, they are not allowed to disinvite a student from class. Welcome to the modern American public school system: if you expel a student, expect a lawsuit. Since the cost of going to court is going to ruin your already ridiculously underfunded budget, as a school administrator you will not do ANYTHING that might put you in danger of that. And since most parents are completely unable to raise civil children, very little learning takes place in school. Putting little Johnny's "self-esteem" a
    • You left out the beginning of that sentence. Let me fix it for you: According to the Portages-de-l'Outaouais school board, the incident took place a month ago, when one student provoked the teacher into yelling at her while a classmate secretly taped the confrontation.

      Now, remember, this is a statement from the same school board that's banning all electronic devices simply because they can be used to provide a factual record of teachers' actions. (Whether the video was taken out of context or not, that's s
  • New trend (Score:5, Interesting)

    by NineNine (235196) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:46PM (#16979308)
    I think that we are FINALLY starting to see all kinds of content, including television content online in some kind of substantial quantity.

    I was checking out Comedy Central's clips of the Daily Show like I usually do every few weeks or so, and I was shocked to find that you can stream tons and tons of good content from the Daily Show at a time. I used to have to click and watch an ad for every 1 minute segment, which was almost more trouble than it was worth. Last night, I clicked "play all", and I got several hours worth of Daily Show content, with ads interspersed through out (like TV).

    I think it's interesting that TV exceutives are FINALLY starting to notice online viewship. It seems to me that they would've done it much earlier, because tracking advertising online is about one beeellion times more effective than those useless Neilson boxes that give very limited information on a tiny same of the population.
    • by MadAhab (40080)
      Interesting choice. Because The Daily Show is a huge, huge piece of media getting extra play online. And the Comedy Central legal goons have screwed the pooch by getting nasty.

      If they were smart, they'd fucking offer a clip service, with explicit authority to rebroadcast on youtube, your website, whatever. And their only terms would be you had to leave that 15 second ad at the beginning of a 3 minute piece. 15 seconds is short enough not to piss people off.

      Alas, I've worked inside big media companies and th
      • Re:New trend (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Telvin_3d (855514) on Friday November 24, 2006 @11:44PM (#16981122)
        I was with you right up to that last part.
        And until Adobe stops dragging their feet on Linux (and even BSD) support, fuck Flash, too. Let's face it, the browser plugin situation is a disaster

        Using Linux is your choice. YOURS. You have made the choice to use an OS that has roughly 3% market share. Not only that, but an OS where interoperability between distros is far from assured. Oddly enough, the fact that Adobe supports 95% of the market sounds like more than enough for me. The browser plug-in situation is great! Flash is compatible on more types of computers than 99% of the programs out there. Flash is more cross-browser and cross-platform compatible than many HTML/CSS websites. If you have chosen to use an OS that is not supported by a piece of software that has become a major part of the web, that is your choice. The rest of the world is under no obligation to support a platform just because you happen to use it.
    • Ah, what you say is correct, if the networks would benefit from more accurate tracking. From what I understand of the cable business, its at least just as likely that media companies get paid more for their commercial spaces than they are worth, as it is that they get paid less.

      I think media companies were faced with significant costs at high risks with the potential to eventually make less money, because advertisers finally realize that people don't watch adds.

      What we were missing was competition, instead,
  • Finally (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Captain Splendid (673276) <capsplendid@gmail . c om> on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:49PM (#16979336) Homepage Journal
    "CBS has uploaded more than 300 clips that have a total of 29.2 million views on YouTube, averaging 857,000 views per day, since the service launched on October 18. CBS has three of the top 25 most viewed videos this month (Nov.1-17), including clips from CBS's Tuesday night hit drama 'NCIS,' 'Late Show with David Letterman,' 'The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson' and 'The Early Show.' The CBS Brand Channel is also one of the most subscribed channels of all time with more than 20,000 users subscribing to CBS programming on YouTube since the channel launch last month."

    Finally! Hopefully, big media will realise that literally giving away content is good for them in the long run. If this catches on like we've been hoping for years now, the DMCA, copyright laws and its like won't need to be changed, they'll just become irrelevant withg the advent of the new paradigm. (sorry for the buzzwords, folks.)
    • The message isn't as strong as you think. There are definite... irregularities... to the comments posted to CBS content.

      CBS clips have an unusually high comment:views ratio and they usually read like text from spin control or a marketing campaign.

      Don't get me wrong, though, I've watched more CBS content on YouTube than I'm likely to ever watch on the TeeVee...
      I'd like to see someone "get it" and legitimately succeed by pursuing the Free and Open path.

    • The CBS Innertube has been a good thing for me. I don't often watch TV, but the CIS stuff is fairly good and I hate to miss it. And Innertube works! Fox.com has a similar service, and ABC sucks. ABC requires your firewall to be dormant, you adblocker to be off, and now you have to allow images from sites other than the original, plus they have installed tracking software with the viewer download. On top of all that, their streaming is spotty and the some programs 'way out of date.
  • by Petersko (564140) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:51PM (#16979350)
    You couldn't pay me enough to be a teacher to primary/secondary student. Well, you could... but it'd have to be one heck of a lot more than a teacher makes now.

    Several of my relatives (my generation) have teaching degrees. One now works in a body shop, one owns a flower shop, and the third is back in school learning a new trade.

    Kids who deliberately provoke a teacher to film the results don't need to be yelled at so much as slapped around a little. And that's why I'd be a terrible teacher.
    • by gnasher719 (869701) on Friday November 24, 2006 @07:57PM (#16979390)
      '' Kids who deliberately provoke a teacher to film the results don't need to be yelled at so much as slapped around a little. And that's why I'd be a terrible teacher. ''

      You would lose your job as a teacher rather quickly. Doesn't mean you would be a bad teacher.
      • by AmericanInKiev (453362) on Friday November 24, 2006 @09:15PM (#16979998) Homepage
        There really are great kids who have been handed poorly-equipped parents by a crueler fate than your own.

        Finding the heart to absorb some of their personal angst whilst moving the class forward in spite of the aggressively self-promotional behaviour is THE key challenge of teaching a PUBLIC school - the principle purpose of which is to address the vicious cycles in society by which the feeble beget the more feeble.

        Its a lofty calling, and both difficult and under-appreciated (to say nothing of misunderstood).

        Here's to those who succeed!

        AIK
      • by dircha (893383)
        "You would lose your job as a teacher rather quickly. Doesn't mean you would be a bad teacher."

        Oh PLEASE. Insightful? It is Insightful to suggest that teachers should "slap kids around a little"?

        This is criminal abuse. Should employers "slap employees around a little"? Should police be able to "slap arestees around a little"?

        Or do you think children are some kind of sub-humans?

        This attitude is shameful. Are we cavemen? Do we want to impress upon our children that the structure of society is that of a chicke
        • Do we want to impress upon our children that the structure of society is that of a chicken house pecking order?

          Might as well get them prepared for it.
    • by oddfox (685475)

      Is it so hard to act like the adult you should be if you were to be in the profession of teaching? One cannot justify something like this with "Well my work is so stressful" as if that's a free ticket to do your job poorly. These kids got what they wanted, if it was really a baiting situation (which, frankly, doesn't matter at all), and the teacher did nothing but embolden them to do it again in the future. I've dealt with enough asshat teachers though over the years to understand that it's not too far fetc

    • by dircha (893383)
      "Kids who deliberately provoke a teacher to film the results don't need to be yelled at so much as slapped around a little. And that's why I'd be a terrible teacher."

      This is a SHAMEFUL attitude.

      There is nothing more important we as a society can do for our future workers, artists, thinkers and leaders than to ensure that they are taught by the absolute best people - best teachers - we can find. Teaching should be seen as one of the highest callings in our society.

      And do you know what it is going to take for
  • A Good Check (Score:2, Insightful)

    by morefiend (913964)
    It's ridiculously easy for teachers to abuse their authority. Many often display questionable behaviour in the classroom or elsewhere, the account of which might be met with skepticism when reported to a higher authority, or might simply be flat-out not reported owing to the submissive nature of most students or due to the awkwardness inherent in getting a teacher chastised for an isolated incident.

    With the knowledge that lectures are being, or might possible be, recorded by the students themselves, teach
    • by dedeman (726830)
      Here, let's modify that a bit, and see how this whole "education" thing works both ways.

      It's ridiculously easy for students to abuse their ubiquity. Many often display questionable behaviour in the classroom or elsewhere, the account of which might be met with skepticism when reported to a higher authority, or might simply be flat-out not reported owing to the agressive nature of some students or due to the awkwardness inherent in getting a student chastised for an isolated incident, or the possibility of a
  • What does this word mean? I can't find it in any dictionary!
  • Not at losing control and yelling at the child but at BEING CAUGHT doing it. Nice to see hypocrisy is not a nationally limited 'virtue' but alive and well worldwide :)
  • Why can't we all just get along?
  • by Tekoneiric (590239) on Friday November 24, 2006 @08:28PM (#16979650) Journal
    I think kids should be allowed to have electronic devices because the threat of being recorded will keep bad teachers in check.
    • by dircha (893383)
      "I think kids should be allowed to have electronic devices because the threat of being recorded will keep bad teachers in check"

      Absolutely!

      And if that means teachers who can't handle the stress or the scandal are weeded out... win for us!

      Once we start to effectively filter out the abusive, dysfunctional, mediocre teachers, we can start to see the salaries of good teachers increase and the prominence of the position in society increase.

      Teaching should be considered one of the highest callings in society.

      I'd
  • The teachers' union is now trying to get all personal electronic devices banned from all schools in Western Quebec.

    So that teachers will be able to yell at each other, beat children without noone seeing, maybe some molest them and so on ?

    so that things will stay hidden ?

    I will never listen to any babbling about 'childcare','child upbringing','good parenting','good teaching' crapola from any teacher from now on.
  • by SlothB77 (873673)
    What is this guy, a pansy?
  • Remember when the digital photos from Abu Ghraib came out, and the Pentagon immediately swung into action to prevent any repetition? By banning digital cameras?

    The school is simply teaching the kids an important real life lesson about what happens to whistleblowers.
  • finds this gem:

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/cbbcnews/hi/newsid_4470000/n ewsid_4476100/4476105.stm [bbc.co.uk]

    Apparently filming kids secretly in a classroom is "underhanded" but not illegal; teachers seem to be unhappy about film material demonstrating that they lost control completely. I can't find anything that says whether open filming would be legal or illegal.
  • So schools, can place CCTVs around to monitor students, submit students to search, and general pry into the lives of students.
    But when students monitor the administration that cannot be allowed to happen?

    This is classic and typical of EVIL OVERLORDS!
  • Being originally from Indiana and the formerly well known Coach Bobby Knight, his unadultered commentary shows up as well. I looked his name up on YouTube. One of them is a half-time tirade in the locker room.

    Here is the link [youtube.com]. Hilarious to listen to but BE FORWARNED, his speech will make a sailor blush. If Coach Knight found about this audio being posted, the team will catch hell even if this was recorded a few years ago !
  • Common now.. (Score:2, Informative)

    by Kabal` (111455)
    A friend of mine who is a teacher said to me a few weeks ago that this was common at the secondary school he teaches at now. Infact, some kids are trying to make their teacher lose their temper on purpose just so they can record it and put it on youtube later. Doing this of course makes the kids who did it a hero among their peers, and the teacher very embarassed.
  • and some wonder why they are quitting [slashdot.org] school ???

    plus another /. story recently on smuggling in cell phones in their underwear

    schools are becoming a battleground over communication. those who have the powerful minds yoked are losing control of the system that keeps the humans docile and working for other's benefit, and they do not like it. ("stay in school, you get a good job!" ... crap) People younger and younger are realizing that the way out is through self sufficiency and most of the formal education
  • Would be to have video cameras installed in EVERY classroom, so that if some smart-alec tries to set up his teacher this way again, the full story can still be seen... including how the teacher was goaded into responding the way that he did. Not that I excuse what he did, but having another video to substantiate what led up to the occurence would have made it a lot easier for him to just apologize for overreacting and move on without continuing to be embarrassed. With such facilities, a student who is tr

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