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Comment Re:Missed the Boat? (Score 1) 254

associated by who?

Pretty much everyone, including law enforcement.
The media loves to link Bitcoin to "the dark web" and terrorism.

invested hundreds of millions of dollars into blockchain technology.

Blockchain technology is not virtual currency, it's merely a distributed/verified ledger of transactions.

Lots of companies want to get involved with using the blockchain concept, not all of them want to get involved with using Bitcoin.

Even SWIFT, the 800 lb gorilla of financial transactions, is trying to figure out how to revamp their business to use blockchain technology as the foundation. Likely a private blockchain which they can control.

Comment Re:Why don't they have a sat link? (Score 2) 102

A sat link isn't a viable alternative for providing data access to a government, much less an entire country.

TFA mentions the microwave backup being down, because commercial microwave links actually can provide significant levels of bandwidth.
The only real limit is line of sight and how much you want to spend.

And as always: Two is one and one is none.
There's a reason why NASA uses triple redundancy when they want something to never fail.

Comment Re:FOIA isn't meant to support a business model. (Score 1) 139

And waste more taxpayer money forcing a public employee to go through all the work again?

I can't recall the name, but there's an organization that spends its free time re-requesting FOIA'ed documents just to see what is or isn't redacted in subsequent releases.

It's basically a social engineering approach to un-redacting documents.

Comment Re:Cry More (Score 1) 139

but I found these two quotes to be interesting:

Heh. The problem is not the fees.
The problem is that journalists and activists overwhelmingly end up having to sue Federal (and State) Agencies in order to get a response or responsive documents to their FOIA requests.

This is despite the fact that Federal Agencies are required by law to respond to FOIA requests within 30(?) days.

"Even when a journalist acts with the utmost diligence in filing a FOIA request and pursuing his or her rights in court, agency feet-dragging can frustrate a journalist's attempt to obtain records at the time when they are needed most," [Jason "FOIA Terrorist" Leopold] wrote [in his written testimony before Congress].

"Investigative journalists should be spending their time and resources investigating, not litigating," he added. "Unfortunately, some agencies refuse to conduct adequate searches and fail to properly apply FOIA's exemption provisions until a lawsuit has been filed."

It can take years of litigation to get documents out of Federal Agencies.
Years. Of paying lawyers.
And then their scoop is gone.

I see the merits of arguments in favor of "upload immediately" (which IMO should be the default position) and "give the journalists a chance."
I think this trial run will expose the lie in any unsupported assertions being made by journalists arguing their position.

Comment Re:I believe it... (Score 1) 327

Students were again instructed to mimic surfing to a designated basket of URLs (Table I) as they might perform research for a paper, casual surfing (news). They were required to spend at least 5 - 15 minutes on each site.

Table 1: Basket of URLs Visited
youtube.com
bild.de
gamestar.de
cnn.com
shopping.com
bloomberg.com
spiegel.de
ebay.com
nytimes.com
mashable.com
yahoo.com
huffingtonpost.com
digg.com
washingtonpost.com
reddit.com
abcnews.go.com
buzzfeed.com
cbs.com
yelp.com
espn.com
msn.com
dailymail.co.uk
skysports.com
imgur.com
imdb.com
techcrunch.com
alibaba.com
reuters.com
cnet.com
thesun.co.uk
stackoverflow.com
bbc.com

Phase II of the testing was conducted from March 15, 2015 to May 1, 2015 with 103 students participating. Phase II revealed some interesting results. For the purposes of analysis, we selected two computers with the most web traffic, one with Adblock Plus (Computer Y) and one without any ad-blocking technology (Computer S).

That's an interesting test methodology and a highly questionable way to cherry pick analyze 2 weeks worth of data.

Comment Re:Links to the actual study (Score 2) 181

What I don't understand is why people assume congestion is intentional throttling by ISPs for them to profit later with imagined fast lanes.

Assume? The ISPs have been fighting (a losing battle) for a legal structure that will allow them to do it.
Hell, they're even telling us that is exactly their plan.

FTFA:

In Atlanta, for example, Comcast provided hourly median download speeds over a CDN called GTT of 21.4 megabits per second at 7pm throughout the month of May. AT&T provided speeds over the same network of â... of a megabit per second. When a network sends more than twice the traffic it receives, that network is required by AT&T to pay for the privilege. When quizzed about slow speeds on GTT, AT&T told Ars Technica earlier this year that it wouldnâ(TM)t upgrade capacity to a CDN that saw that much outgoing traffic until it saw some money from that network (as distinct from the money it sees from consumers).

Comment Connected? (Score 1) 281

build and connected with the [Microsoft account] you used to register, you will receive the Windows 10 final release build and remain activated.

Is this like Windows 8 where it nags you to sign in with a @msn or @hotmail account?
Because I'm very much uninterested in having Microsoft follow along with my daily activities.

Comment Re:Trade authority (Score 1) 413

It is important to realize here that this does not mean that the bills would be automatically passed, rather that congress either has to say "yes" or "no," they can't add pork to the bill (like they tried on this one).

They also can't amend it to remove super shitty clauses that were negotiated in secret over a period of years.

Comment Re:So, how did ... (Score 3, Interesting) 253

A jet engine that fails by disintegration has a high chance of slicing other airplane parts with ripped off fan blades.

It's actually exceedingly rare for there to be an uncontained failure.

That engine shroud is intended to handle catastrophic failures at full throttle.
This video is a test of the Rolls-Royce Trent 900 engine that went into the Airbus A380. The test starts ~3:25 in.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=j973645y5AA

Then again, this is the same engine after an oil leak led to an internal engine fire
https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/2891294/vh-oqa-fig7.jpg
https://www.atsb.gov.au/media/4173628/ao-2010-089_vh-oqa.jpg

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) found that a number of oil feed stub pipes within the High Pressure / Intermediate pressure (HP/IP) hub assembly were manufactured with thin wall sections that did not conform to the design specifications. These non-conforming pipes were fitted to Trent 900 engines, including the No. 2 engine on VH-OQA. The thin wall section significantly reduced the life of the oil feed stub pipe on the No. 2 engine so that a fatigue crack developed, ultimately releasing oil during the flight that resulted in an internal oil fire. That fire led to the separation of the intermediate pressure turbine disc from the drive shaft. The disc accelerated and burst with sufficient force that the engine structure could not contain it, releasing high-energy debris.

Most of the shroud's strength is focused around the main fan blades instead of the turbine blades that are much deeper in the engine.

Comment Re:Five years away? (Score 1) 389

Right now, we already have cars with cruise control that can go from 0-highway speed-0.
We also have cars with "lane assist" which will steer you back into your lane if you start to drift.

All that's left is figuring out lane control during shitty weather.
Though I'm really interested in how self driving cars on all-season tires will handle unplowed streets/highways.

Comment Re:Typo: Digital Rights Management (Score 1) 371

So you want complete freedom of expression as long as others agree with your vision.

There's no such thing as complete freedom of expression.
We naturally put limits on expression to prevent assholes from taking advantage and causing us all grief.

Some people see DRM as part of the assholes who would cause us grief.

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