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Comment: Re:Stuipd.. (Score 1) 290

by wasted (#45646489) Attached to: New Ford Mustang May Have Electronic "Burnout" Button

If you can't do a burn out with a Ford Mustang, you should probably go buy yourself a Prius or a Miata instead.

I'm thinking that it is pretty difficult to do a burn out in a Prius, but it is pretty easy in a Miata. It varies, depending upon the year, but for older ones, they should be near 140hp in an about 2300lb car with rear wheel drive and a 4.++:1 drive ratio. At these numbers burn-outs are easy to achieve with little problem, even when unwanted. As they say on automotive boards, "ask me how I know" or "don't ask me how I know," depending upon outcome.

Thus, your advice to get a Miata to do burn-outs if one can't do them in a Mustang is probably good advice. I don't think it holds up well for the Prius, though.

Comment: Re: That Analogy Falls Apart (Modern Technology) (Score 1) 917

by tlassanske (#29295355) Attached to: Sending Astronauts On a One-Way Trip To Mars
Early human settlers used the "Modern Technology" of their day (knapping knives, spearpoints and arrowheads) to successfully conquer their new environment. Pioneer settlers used the "Modern Technology" of THEIR day (clothes, hatchet, musket, etc) to successfully conquer their new environment. Their naysayer peers probably said things like, "Colonists will be entirely dependent on modern technology to merely keep the the things that keep them alive running. Think of all the component parts and manufacturing technology to replace a musket if it breaks...". New environment, same old situation. The environment may be harsher, but the technology probably makes up for the difference. There's risk in any of the three scenarios.

Comment: Re:For Earthbound, mebbe... (Score 1) 231

by Fluffeh (#29295231) Attached to: Astronomers Search For the Calmest Place On Earth

>>>best spot for observational astronomy has to be the far side of the Moon... What's not to love?

Funny you mention "love" because there's no women on the moon, or on that ridge in Antarctica, which is a major drawback of accepting either of those jobs. Oh wait. It's just like my current job.

Oh, you work on the dark side of the moon too? We should meet up for coffee sometime!

Comment: Which deck? (Score 1) 316

by wasted (#29269389) Attached to: My flash memory is mostly in the form of ...

Which deck do you have? I have the KDC-x891, and I can skip to the next or previous song, next or previous folder, or twist the knob on the right to search by song, click it left to search the next folder level (which would be albums based on the way my .wav files are named), and basically go to the album and song I desire. I think most of the Kenwoods with USB work similarly. I could be wrong, though, since I haven't been reading the online manuals for various stereos as often as I once did.

By the way, WAV=CD. All decks can do that.

If the deck doesn't list WAV support for USB drives in their manual, should we expect that the deck will support it?

Comment: Re:One Person is not a Program (Score 2, Interesting) 153

by wasted (#29248575) Attached to: Ares Manager Steve Cook Resigns From NASA

Darn, screwed up the blockquotes.
Corrected:

If that is the case, then NASA really needs to work on hiring and/or training more Program Managers.

Sorry, I don't think feeding the giant bureaucracy that NASA has become will get the results we want. Here's my manned space program:

            1. Take the money NASA gets for manned space and give it to Burt Rutan.
            2. Tell Burt to get people into orbit and to the Moon.
            3. Stand back.

Burt's company is Scaled Composites . I don't think I would trust a flight to the Moon and back, and more importantly, reentry, to a composite craft. On the other hand, if Burt thinks he can do it, he could pitch it to NASA - Dryden is just a short drive from his shop.

Comment: Re:One Person is not a Program (Score 0, Redundant) 153

by wasted (#29248557) Attached to: Ares Manager Steve Cook Resigns From NASA

If that is the case, then NASA really needs to work on hiring and/or training more Program Managers.

Sorry, I don't think feeding the giant bureaucracy that NASA has become will get the results we want. Here's my manned space program:

      1. Take the money NASA gets for manned space and give it to Burt Rutan.
      2. Tell Burt to get people into orbit and to the Moon.
      3. Stand back.

Burt's company is Scaled Composites . I don't think I would trust a flight to the Moon and back, and more importantly, reentry, to a composite craft. On the other hand, if Burt thinks he can do it, he could pitch it to NASA - Dryden is just a short drive from his shop.

Comment: Re:How special do you think you are? (Score 1) 703

by FourthAge (#29247219) Attached to: James Murdoch Criticizes BBC For Providing "Free News"

I don't see why it would be at a disadvantage to commercial news sources in terms of reducing bias.

Ah, we're talking at cross purposes! Yes, it can counteract the bias of other news sources, but the ties to Government are decidedly unhealthy. It frustrates me (a) because we have to pay for it, and (b) because people say that the absence of commercial interests means that it is impartial, which is not true. This is why I don't like it. I suppose I did say so in a rather Flamebaity way though... guess I misjudged the amount of pro-BBC feeling on here.

Comment: Yes it would (Score 2, Interesting) 296

by zogger (#29246549) Attached to: Pacific Ocean Garbage Patch Worries Researchers

"Would need some sort of high-volume filtration system."

    Yes it would, and wouldn't that be an extremely intertesting bit of technology to develop? Right off the bat if they first developed a way to get the plastic to reclump together, then the filter, then be able to further refine it, it could be a very lucrative oceanic mine for decades, like has been mentioned, get some fishermen and sailors back to useful work. And similar high volume filtration tech might be used for another example say in cleaning up fresh water sources better, or to be part of waste water treatment plants. We already have filtration systems for this or that, but to develop something that could work on that sort of scale could very well be some important tech down the road. And like was pointed out, being plastic, this could help develop interest in larger scale energy plants that could use the stuff, including th..terraforming isn't the word, aquaforming? Huge floating energy conversion barges. Or just concentrate it back down so it could be used for..manufactured plastic goods. I don't see the need for plastics going away anytime soon, nor the need for more forms of energy. And we need *work* for millions and millions more people planet wide every year, something useful.

A lot of times I think we humans might be better off just with a 180 attitude adjustment, instead of always looking at things as problems, if we just looked at them as opportunities, it might make solutions appear easier and work better. The old saw of how to look at things, the glass half full or half empty deal. Turn the "Oh, noes!!" into the "Hot Damn!"s.

Comment: Re:WTF? (Score 2, Insightful) 327

by Teancum (#29238777) Attached to: Crime Expert Backs Call For "License To Compute"

I don't know about the particular location on the college campus being referred to (it seem likely it was a dorm rec room) but even the "private property" arguement doesn't hold water here. The GP post suggested he was engaged in an otherwise lawful activity (watching television) with others that he also knew. At the very least, he could have under most normal circumstances claimed to be a "guest" of one of the other students he was with and that should have ended it.

As for the private/public distinction, even that is a little hazy. There is loitering that perhaps could have been asserted as a possible charge of criminal behavior, if it could be documented that the individual in question had no relationship to anybody else at the facility. Also, most college-campus buildings, in cases like this, would have a curfew for when non-residents (at a dorm) or non-students (or even students in most other buildings) must leave. If the officer was saying something like "time's up... time to leave" or something a bit friendlier, asking for IDs may have made more sense. I've had campus police do exactly that and not ask for IDs when involved in a similar activity in the past... essentially, "get lost and when I (the officer) come back I don't want to see you here".

I also find that kind of attitude about a closed college campus restrictive in terms of a university education as a whole. Besides treating college students as adults (maybe young adults with some problems, but adults none the less) goes a long way to get things to happen that can also prevent crime.

Comment: Re:Hands off! (Score 2, Interesting) 853

by CAIMLAS (#29238265) Attached to: Emergency Government Control of the Internet?

This move is horribly transparent.

The evident reason is so that, in the event of social dissent or uprising, they can cut off the communication of those dissenting. See: Iran just a month ago.

"Oh, it's been legal for years. Why would anyone care when they started to do it now if they didn't care when the law was passed?"

Surely, though, the Democrats will not abuse this. Surely. We have nothing to worry about.

If an experiment works, something has gone wrong.

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