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Comment: Re:Remember 911 (Score 1) 21

That's the excuse that is being trotted out by our lords and masters. In that context, these moves make sense in their eyes. The debate is whether (a) whether the threat is real (b) it's enough to justify the intrusions by the state and (c) whether the state actually achieves anything by these intrusions. All these points are disputable, but it's unfair to dismiss them without consideration.

Fact: If a service provider is capable of giving my information to law enforcement when faced with a legally sound and fully justified search warrant, then they are capable of reading my information without any such warrant. Including information that they have no right or justification to access and that is highly sensitive and could be highly damaging to me if published.

Comment: www.computerworld.com.au site (Score 2) 21

Tried to post a comment on their site without having an account. Got an error 403 (forbidden). In other words, the guys creating their website and/or server software are clueless twats.

And every company wanting to avoid the fate of Lavabit must just make sure that they don't have the capability to decrypt customers' data. That way, the company and the customer are safe from law enforcement. (Hiring a lawyer at the right time also helps, and sending keys to a court in a 4 point font doesn't).

Comment: Re:New OS X is free* (Score 1) 188

by gnasher719 (#46828249) Attached to: You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

There is no LEGAL licensing restriction that prohibits you from building a Hackintosh. Trying to sell hackintoshes is another matter.

There is - the MacOS X license only allows running the software on Apple branded computers, and there is copy protection (which everyone can get around) which makes this fall under the DMCA.

On the other hand, there is the fact that Apple has never taken notice of anyone building their own Hackintosh. The only time they did take notice was with Psystar, and those guys effectively _forced_ Apple to take action.

Comment: Re:New OS X is free* (Score 1) 188

by gnasher719 (#46828173) Attached to: You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

Oh really? Do you know how many variations of video cards you get with nVidia and AMD alone? When I had a PC, I can tell you that an updated driver from either of them had a chance of making your video unusable to the point where you had to roll back to a previous driver. Add in drivers for Ethernet, sound, etc and and it's not pure speculation. It's fact. Apple has invested a great deal in customer support. Can you imagine the sheer number of appointments they would have to deal with for hardware problems that they had nothing to do with/ability to fix?

That _would_ be a good reason not to release MacOS X for PCs, but even if all PCs were absolutely 100% compatible to each other, Apple would still not release MacOS X for PCs for the reasons I said - because they make more money from selling Macs than they could make from selling operating systems.

Comment: Re:Opens the door to BS stops (Score 1) 407

by gnasher719 (#46824765) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

Law enforcement (being allowed to lie) already uses the "we've had noise complaints" or "there was a X crime in the area" bullshit to harass people they have a "hunch" are up to no good.

"Being allowed to lie" means something different. Let's say you plan to smash in a car window. A person you don't know is watching you. The prudent person that you are, you ask them "are you a cop"? The answer is "No", you smash the car window, and the cop arrests you. That's the kind of lie a cop is allowed to make. Now let's say he turned his back on you, and you smashed the window without him seeing you, but he heard you, and there was nobody else who could have done it. Later in court the judge asks him "did you see this man smashing the car window" and he says "Yes". That's the kind of lie he isn't allowed to make.

Comment: Re:This is wrong! (Score 1) 407

by gnasher719 (#46824557) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

Hmm, is there any proof of this smell? If not, it is equivalent to hearsay, wouldn't you say?

Hearsay is different. Hearsay happens when I say something outside the court, and obviously I'm allowed to talk a lot of nonsense outside the court, so when someone says in court what they heard me say, that may be evidence that I said it, but it isn't evidence that it is true. Here, the fact that the officer says "I smelled drugs" isn't evidence that there were drugs, but it is evidence that he indeed smelled drugs. And that is all he needs to search the car.

Comment: Re:Does it also apply to homes? (Score 1) 407

by gnasher719 (#46824463) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

As for her continued anonymity, they could certainly retrieve that information, and use voiceprints to confirm that it was indeed her making the phone call. Did they? I dunno, you'd need the transcripts of the trial.

Whether she said the truth or not would only be relevant if (a) the police tried to convict the driver for running her off the road or (b) the police tried to convict her for making a false accusation of a crime. It is _not_ relevant to whether the police should have stopped the car or not. What would be relevant to _this_ case is whether her accusation was believable or not.

Comment: Re:Toot little too late (Score 1) 188

by gnasher719 (#46824367) Attached to: You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

wanna try again? you seem to think apple is a computer company

Let me think. Article headline: "You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X-For Free". OS X (or more properly MacOS X) is Apple's computer operating system. The whole article is about computers. So clearly your initial post must have been about how well Apple is doing or not doing in the computer market. Unless you are an imbecile with the attention span of a gnat who cannot read a simple headline.

We are discussing computers here. We are not discussing what percentage of Apple's profits and revenue come from computer. We are discussing how big the computer selling part of Apple is in the computer market. Somewhere else we could be discussing how big Apple is in the ever shrinking market for portable music players (hint: Amazon doesn't sell any new music players with more than 32 GB capacity that are not made by Apple). We could discuss what percentage of set top boxes are made by Apple in yet another place. But here we are discussing computers.

Comment: Re:New OS X is free* (Score 1) 188

by gnasher719 (#46824231) Attached to: You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

I am one of those who would be willing to purchase an OS X license to install on a non-Apple PC. Yet they don't even give the option to do so. I have heard the explanation that they don't want to be on the hook for support on the matter, and I'm fine with that - just let us buy a license with no support and be done with it.

I've heard that explanation as well, and it is pure speculation and most likely wrong. The reason why Apple doesn't sell licenses for MacOS X is that MacOS X is basically used as advertisements for the sale of Apple hardware, and that's where the profit is. They don't even care about getting money from upgrades anymore (10.9 was a free upgrade). If you think about buying a Mac today, you know that you will get at least two or three OS updates for free, which costs Apple nothing but increases the value of the Mac compared to a PC.

Comment: Re:We'd need a common hardware interface (Score 1) 131

by gnasher719 (#46823393) Attached to: Google's Project Ara Could Bring PC-Like Hardware Ecosystem To Phones

Something that already exists on the PC. You can trivially boot up any operating system you want on any PC and the basic things like the display and the input devices will just work.

iPhone users can trivially boot up any operating system they want; it's called iOS. Android phone users can trivially boot up any operating system they want; it's called Android. How many people want to boot up two operating systems?

Comment: Re:Toot little too late (Score 1) 188

by gnasher719 (#46823237) Attached to: You Can Now Run Beta Versions of OS X—For Free

apart from that your figure of 45% is nonsense

Published on theregister.com. Estimated profits 45% Apple, 13% Dell, 7% Lenovo, the rest - very little. Consider this: In the USA, Apple sells about 90% of all laptops over $1,000. Not "45% of Apple's profit". "45% of all profits made from selling laptop and desktop hardware". By the way, the market share of iPhones in the phone market has been growing every year, but that would be too boring to report. It's just that feature phones are more and more replaced by cheap smart phones. You think Apple cares if millions in China buy the cheapest smartphone they can find?

Comment: Re:Does it also apply to homes? (Score 0) 407

by gnasher719 (#46822973) Attached to: Supreme Court OKs Stop and Search Based On Anonymous 911 Tips

If someone who doesn't like me makes an "anonymous" call to 911 to report that I'm running meth lab in my garage, does that also give the cops the right to ransack my house looking for a meth lab?

A meth lab is quite big, so I don't think there is any justification for ransacking your house to find it. Just open every door and have a look into every room. And a call saying you're running a meth lab in your garage should clearly give them a warrant for the garage only.

Comment: Re:Not what the masses want. (Score 2) 131

by gnasher719 (#46821195) Attached to: Google's Project Ara Could Bring PC-Like Hardware Ecosystem To Phones

I love how Apple has shown time and time again what the majority of customers want... except of course that the iPhone market share is a fraction what Android's is.

Apple doesn't want market share. If customer A buys a $600 iPhone, and customers B, C, D, E, F and G buy a $100 Android phone, Android has a six times higher market share. But both have the same revenue, and you may make a guess who makes a ton more profit.

"If that makes any sense to you, you have a big problem." -- C. Durance, Computer Science 234

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