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Atlassian Acquires Trello For $425M (techcrunch.com) 90

An anonymous reader shares a TechCrunch report: Atlassian today announced that it has acquired project management service Trello for $425 million. The vast majority of the transaction is in cash ($360 million), with the remainder being paid out in restricted shares and options. The acquisition is expected to close before March 31, 2017. This marks Atlassian's 18th acquisition and, as Atlassian president Jay Simons noted, it is also the largest. Just like with many of Atlassian's other acquisitions, the company plans to keep both the Trello service and brand alive and current users shouldn't see any immediate changes.
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Atlassian Acquires Trello For $425M

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  • by Anonymous Coward

    How in the world do these people get so much money in the first place!?! I mean, seriously. Holy, fuck!

    • I also have no clue, better raise a ticket!

    • I mean, Trello has 19 Million users, so that's ~$80 a user. Given that Jira runs $10 a month (plus more for related services), that could be cheap for high quality leads to upsell into Atlassian's ecosystem.

  • by ArchieBunker ( 132337 ) on Monday January 09, 2017 @02:06PM (#53635163) Homepage

    And still have no idea what these companies produce or why I should care.

    • Re:Read the article (Score:5, Informative)

      by fiannaFailMan ( 702447 ) on Monday January 09, 2017 @02:12PM (#53635215) Journal

      If you plan to work in an Agile environment then you might want to drop that attitude and make it your business to find out what these companies do.

      Atlassian produces online collaboration tools like Jira and Confluence. Jira is a ticket-management system that lets you set up Kanban boards or SCRUM boards on which your team tracks the progress of tickets through the various stages to completion, and supports Agile visualizations such as burn-down charts. Confluence is a wiki-like tool for sharing documentation.

      Plenty of employers are asking for Agile experience, so if you're familiar with these tools then it'll work in your favor.

      • I have no idea what any of those words mean. In five years they will be meaningless.

    • by 0100010001010011 ( 652467 ) on Monday January 09, 2017 @03:14PM (#53635731)

      And still have no idea what these companies produce or why I should care.

      And in the same breath Slashdotters will whine that they have relevant skillsets and that it's because of their age they can't get hired.

      • by Junta ( 36770 )

        If an employer gets hung up on whether a developer has used Atlassian product before, then they are crazy. The learning curve of these systems should be trivial. If the applicant at least seems comfortable with the principles of how you do things, knowledge of the tools should be easy.

        I could see getting a bit nervous if they have not used git, but even then if they'd used any version control software, I wouldn't be too bothered.

        Ideally you wouldn't even get *too* hung up on whether they have experience w

        • If an employer gets hung up on whether a developer has used Atlassian product before, then they are crazy.

          Not if they want new employees to hit the ground running.

          The learning curve of these systems should be trivial.

          What if it isn't? What if they don't want to pay you to figure it out?

          I find it valuable to fish for technology a candidate is not familiar with and see how they react to the prospect of having to deal with it, even if that technology would not be part of the actual job.

          Well, maybe you have a difference of opinion. And they just sold out for $425 million.

          While your opinion may have value, we know they succeeded so their method is definitely workable.

          The simplest counterargument to your entire line of reasoning is this: If they have access to a pool containing hundreds of competent candidates, they should choose a competent candidate with relevant e

          • by Junta ( 36770 )

            Not if they want new employees to hit the ground running.

            The ramp-up contributed by lack of familiarity with your selected tools should be so small as to not be noticeable in the presumably much larger ramp-up associated with them familiarizing themselves with your specific team and work. If you are actually needing sophisticated project management tools, then your work is not trivial and there is *no* way to hit the ground running, and the *least* of your worries should be whether or not they are able to figure out your selected tools. If it *is* a significant

        • by mlts ( 1038732 )

          You would be surprised. When I was looking for work a few months ago, knowing the exact tool was a deal breaker. If you didn't know Bamboo, the interview was over, for example. Or, if you GitLab and GHE, but not BitBucket, you were shown the door.

          • by Junta ( 36770 )

            I suppose my *hope* is that I influence fellow people to not get that hung up. I occasionally am in the position of hiring, and I give nearly no weight to whether or not they have used our chosen tools before versus understand the general idea. Now if someone acts overly intimidated with working with unfamiliar technology, or claims they do know the tooling when they clearly don't, that is something I consider a warning sign.

        • The comment I replied to said "still have no idea what these companies produce".

          There's a difference between "I've never used Atlassian's Git server however I've setup my own GitLab/Hub/Gogs server. And I have not use Trello specifically but I am familiar with use of Kanban boards in the development process".

          The comment I replied to showed complete ignorance to both companies listed and the "why I should care" tells me that they have no interest in learning.

          I could see getting a bit nervous if they have not used git, but even then if they'd used any version control software, I wouldn't be too bothered.

          That's just asking for trouble. Especially for an

    • "It’s easy to see how Trello fits into Atlassian’s overall suite of productivity tools, which have increasingly targeted non-developers, too. At its core, Atlassian’s own JIRA project management service already features a Trello-like Kanban board, for example. That’s only a small part of what JIRA does, however, and for many potential users, a board is really all they need to keep track of their projects. JIRA also features a full-blown issue-tracking service, reports, and an on-prem
  • by null etc. ( 524767 ) on Monday January 09, 2017 @02:07PM (#53635171)

    I bet the layer of product managers at Atlassian became top-heavy, with number of managers outpacing the number of sub-par software products they release (like JIRA.) So, the natural next step in the evolution of the company is to buy a non-sub-par software product company, and let the product managers have their way with turning the purchased software products into sub-par products. That way, every product manager gets a fair share of practice at screwing up perfectly fine software that probably doesn't really need to be modified in the ways they are intending.

  • If they could build Trello into Jira, they would improve the best project management platform on the market.
    • JIRA has a kanban board and it's pretty awesome. It's been a little while since i've used it but I remember the columns had to be defined by issue filters instead of just an arbitrary name like in Trello and having to use filters to define columns was a bit of a PITA. If you take the time to really master JIRA it's an incredible tool where Trello lets you get all the advantages of kanban with the least amount of effort. I suspect you'll be able to create issues in JIRA and have them show up in Trello pretty
      • You're exactly right, with why I think Trello + Jira would just be near prefect. I like the boards in Jira, but the setup is a little annoying. Even though it's annoying it still is the best tool almost full stop for project management that I've used.
      • by jezwel ( 2451108 )
        This is about where we are also - IT uses JIRA and business uses something else. Would be nice if the products could converge and still meet all those use cases.
  • by volodymyrbiryuk ( 4780959 ) on Monday January 09, 2017 @02:32PM (#53635369)
    Atlassian guys probably bought it because they were sick and tired using their own crap.
  • Joel Spolsky, co-founder of Trello, has this fantastic Excel training video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0nbkaYsR94c

  • by swm ( 171547 ) <swmcd@world.std.com> on Monday January 09, 2017 @07:16PM (#53637565) Homepage

    I don't know what Atlassian will do with Trello, but their existing products are horrid.
    We use JIRA (a bug tracker) and Confluence (a wiki). These suffer from
    - poor use of screen space
    - useless search
    - crude and inconsistent text editing
    - verbose, non-standard, and broken markdown

    Atlassian products are built for shelf-appeal: they are designed to look good in sales demos, and to appeal the people who sign POs and checks: CEOs, VPs, and directors. But they don't actually work for the people who have to use them: programmers and first-line managers.

    Atlassian puts their own bug database [atlassian.com] online. When you find a problem with Atlassian software you can search for it there. You will likely find that other people have found this problem before you, and opened tickets on it, which Atlassian has since closed, explaining either
    - yes, it is broken, but fixing it would be hard, so we're not going to
    OR
    - no, that's the way it is supposed to work, and we're not going to change it

    • by labnet ( 457441 )

      We use a scrum plugin for redmine which our software guys seem to like and actually use... plus it is open source!

    • Atlassian puts their own bug database [atlassian.com] online. When you find a problem with Atlassian software you can search for it there. You will likely find that other people have found this problem before you, and opened tickets on it, which Atlassian has since closed, explaining either - yes, it is broken, but fixing it would be hard, so we're not going to OR - no, that's the way it is supposed to work, and we're not going to change it

      Agree. There are so many feature requests that would make the tool more useful that they flat out reject because... I guess they don't feel like doing work?

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