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Quake is 10 405

Posted by timothy
from the shaky-decade dept.
cyclomedia writes "Late on 22nd June 1996 Quake was uploaded to cdrom.com's archives in the form of 7 1.44MB floppy disk images. Though it wasn't until the 23rd that everyone realised (or at least, that's my excuse for being a day late with the news submission). Cue much aggravation on the newsgroups as eager downloaders experienced glorious 2 FPS gameplay."
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Quake is 10

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  • Old schoolin' (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Pope (17780) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:43PM (#15591946)
    Hell, I remember going to a vending machine at a local mall to buy Doom! Had to supply my own 3.25" floppies and everything. What a crazy way of getting software, and IIRC it was $18 in 1 dollar coins.
  • by neonprimetime (528653) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:47PM (#15591970)
    quake091.zip is nearly 9MB in size

    Oh how times have changed.
  • 10 years! (Score:5, Funny)

    by uberjoe (726765) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:49PM (#15591992)
    Insert Ob "My God, now I feel old" comment.
    • Re:10 years! (Score:5, Insightful)

      by doti (966971) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:54PM (#15592042) Homepage
      Specially if you realize that today's multi-giga games don't offer much more, neither in fun, gameplay, and even content.
      • by Sycraft-fu (314770) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:19PM (#15592236)
        Seriously, what is it with the grouch crowd on Slashdot that lvoes to hate on any game newer than 1980s? Look man, I'm big on old games, really big. I play onld NES and SNES games all the time, I've worked hard to get my DOS emulator working well on XP-64 so I can play X-com, Castles, Darklands, Epic Pinball and such. I really enjoy classic gaming. However, I play new games too, and let me tell you, there's been major improvements.

        There are plenty of great new games, if you haven't found them it is because you are being willfully blind. Some are nothing more than updates of old games, but wonderful ones at that. Civilization 4 is a good example. As the name implies it's the 4th in the series. Each game is just the old one made anew. The fundimental premise of the game doesn't change. However each one is a worthy successor. The gameplay and mechanics take a huge step up, as well as graphics and sound. Some are more orignal, such as Knights of the Old Republic. Jedi Knight meets NWN.

        Also, I think you'll discover that if you take off the rose coloured glassess of memory you'll find that many of those great old games, well, aren't. I've found that games that I just loved as a kid are not nearly as good now. I remember how tought Final Fantasy used to see, how a group of us would get together on the weekends and play it as a team. Now it's trivial, formulaic even. If enemy if type X, do strategy Y, etc. Still cool, but no comparison to, say Baldur's Gate 2. Of course I doubt I'd have liked BG2 as a kid, too high level, too much reading.

        So please, let's stop with this "new games don't bring anything to the table". Yes they do. They aren't all great, of course, but you would be positively amazed at the utter crap released for old systems. Ever play Captian Novilon? I thought not, it was an SNES game about diabeties. Yes really. A huge pile of shit and it's just one of a massive list.

        There are plenty of new, good games. There are plenty of resources to help you find them, or you can ask on Slashdot. However if you can't find any good modern games, the problem is not the state of games, the problem is you.
        • by arivanov (12034) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:32PM (#15592308) Homepage
          There is nothing wrong with the slashdot crowd.

          In fact everything is right with the slashdot crowd.

          The slashdot crowd is absolutely bloody right to expect that 10 years later something with the visuals of Quake and the level of game AI complexity of Nethack should have been written released and shipped.

          And that has not happened. The monsters in the newer quakes, dooms and the likes are as daft as in the original. There is no random or even pseudorandom level generation.

          It is the same old grind. Granted it is with very fancy visuals, but in 10 years I would have expected the industry to come up with something moderately more engaging.

          So the slashdot crowd is entitled to bitch and it surely does.

          When it is not engaged playing Nethack. Where the f... did that storm giant go... I need to kill it and eat it as I am missing the intrinsic...

          • There is no random or even pseudorandom level generation.

            SLIGE [doomworld.com], SCUDD [newdoom.com], SLUMP [samiam.org].

            Okay, so they don't make breathtakingly amazing levels. But they're still better than 90% of the user-made Doom levels out there...

          • by metamatic (202216)
            I was a big DOOM player, and I was very disappointed in Quake. Not only were the monsters just as dumb, but the rest of the gameplay was dumber than DOOM--the idea of levels you had to puzzle out had apparently disappeared.

            I'd naturally assumed that Quake would improve the gameplay, monster AI, and co-operative play. Instead, they dumbed those down and just improved the graphics and deathmatches. And thus began the tendency of FPS games to develop in exactly the opposite direction to the direction I'm inter
            • I was a big DOOM player, and I was very disappointed in Quake. Not only were the monsters just as dumb, but the rest of the gameplay was dumber than DOOM--the idea of levels you had to puzzle out had apparently disappeared.

              One of my favorite aspects of Quake is that they removed the retarded "puzzles" that were all over Doom. Having to run around trying to find a switch that you can barely see because the whole game looks like dogshit is not my idea of a puzzle.

              The criticism about the monsters is ent

          • The slashdot crowd is absolutely bloody right to expect that 10 years later something with the visuals of Quake and the level of game AI complexity of Nethack should have been written released and shipped.

            You mean, something with the visuals like This? [mooh.org]

            In the 10 years since Quake, you've had engaging story elements added by the likes of Half Life, high player interaction with plot in Deus Ex, an MMPOFPS Planetside, the FPSRTS Savage, The whole counterstrike phenomenon, Goldeneye, an FPS platformer in Metroid
          • by Dirtside (91468) on Saturday June 24, 2006 @01:15AM (#15594873) Journal
            The slashdot crowd is absolutely bloody right to expect that 10 years later something with the visuals of Quake and the level of game AI complexity of Nethack should have been written released and shipped.
            Nope. Top-notch visuals, in practice, do not come about without a paid development team of professional artists and designers; the complexity of Nethack was evolved over two decades by geeks in their spare time. Companies will not take two decades to create a game (DNF notwithstanding), and geeks in their spare time do not have the resources to create top-notch game artwork.

            It is, in fact, entirely unsurprising that this hasn't happened.

            There is no random or even pseudorandom level generation.
            There's a very good reason why you rarely see random level generation: It's extremely limited. (As a game designer, I've had a good deal of experience with the problem of randomly generating game content.) "Preposterous!" you say. "Random level generation means exponentially increased variety for only slightly more effort!"

            While this is technically true, the problem with randomly generated content is that it's very easy for humans to recognize the patterns and elements of the random set. Anyone who's played Diablo or Diablo II enough is familiar with this. At first, the random levels are pretty neat, each time you go into the cathedral it's a different layout... but after a few times, you begin to recognize certain elements (a room shaped a certain way, a certain set of prison cells arranged just so), and after a while, you see enough permutations that even if the level isn't one you've exactly seen before, it's similar enough to all the others you've seen that it's basically the same.

            Even if you create 100 distinct rooms for your dungeon that can be arranged in 100 billion unique ways, there's still only 100 basic elements, and you'll begin to recognize them pretty quickly. Randomly generated content also violates the precept that games are a form of storytelling; and randomly generated stories are not interesting. Notice that even in a game like Diablo II, with randomly generated levels, the quests are always exactly the same and the dialogue is always exactly the same -- because you really can't randomly generate a good, original story.

            but in 10 years I would have expected the industry to come up with something moderately more engaging.
            I've played plenty of engaging games since Quake came out; if you haven't been "engaged" at all since then, that's your problem.
        • by irc.goatse.cx troll (593289) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:39PM (#15592371) Journal
          Name one thing that is in an FPS game that isn't in current quakeworld engines. Note that quakeworld has been opensourced for a long time now and has had time to evolve purel based on peoples desire for a better engine, no desire to try to be able to sell polished crap. Whether you're a visual junkie(Specular lighting, 24bit textures, Luma textures, Bloom lighting, Weather effects, Per pixel shadows, particle explosions/trails, etc), a Tech junkie(MD1/2/3 model support (thats quake1 through quake3 and everything between), BSP1/2/3 (Again, q1-3 and every game based on it), PK3 support(the compressed archive q3 uses to store its files), even so far as to support Quake3 QVMs, which is pretty much a .dll that is the entirety of a mods game-code, Direct encoding from ingame to an avi (xvid+mp3), etc)

          And then theres the stuff for gameplay. Fully customizable hud. Arbitrarily re-coloring text(makes for good teamplay scripts), Regular expression triggers for console text(so you can match "someone stole your flag!" and play a sound for example), TCL scripting(I don't like it, but to each their own), Advanced scripting (if/then blocks, variables, math), etc.

          It's not that games havn't improved since 1996, its that while companies are busy trying to add a few new features to their engines so they can hype it up, we've all been sitting here playing with the best christmas present anyone ever got us--Quake's source.

          Of course I only focused on the engine (whats important-- as a good mod has its balls cut off by being on a bad engine), but for gameplay just look at stuff like CustomTF, RocketArena, MidAir, ClanArena. For that matter, I've yet to have a better co-op experience than quake right out of the box.

        • > Civilization 4 is a good example. As the name implies it's the 4th in the series. Each game is just the old one made anew. The fundimental premise of the game doesn't change. However each one is a worthy successor. The gameplay and mechanics take a huge step up, as well as graphics and sound.

          Civ4 may not be the best example: the last two games haven't approached the production values of Alpha Centauri, which was crammed full of jaw-dropping cutscenes, eerie music, intelligent quotes (some fictional, so
        • Sure there are some good new games. But I think there's something to what the grandparent said.

          Typical gamers that grew up with the current generation are really looking for flash and instant gratification. A large percentage of modern games focus primarily on graphics, and tend to throw gameplay out the window.

          Older games had to focus on gameplay simply because no matter how good the graphics were they still were just a series of low FPS, low-res, 2d, pixelated images.

          It's not that I'm against awesome gr
      • Re:10 years! (Score:2, Insightful)

        by stratjakt (596332)
        Oh bullshit.

        Quake 4, Half Life 2, etc.. All the fun and more, with a healthy dose of jaw-dropping graphics.

        Quit trying to get cred by waxing nostalgic for graphics that sucked.

        I remember Quake fondly, one of my first University projects was to write a report analysing the usage of a particular language, and while most of the class jumped on the shiney new Java, or latest iteration of Visual Basic, and I did QuakeC. Got like a 97% on the project too, dragged down by a couple stupid typos.

        It was fun pissing
      • Re:10 years! (Score:2, Insightful)

        by Moofie (22272)
        That's such a tired argument. I enjoyed Half Life way, way more than I enjoyed Quake. Your mileage may vary, but it's silly to argue that games were better in the Good Old Days.

        Remember Sturgeon's Law. 90% of everything is crap. You only remember the good stuff.
    • by Professeur Shadoko (230027) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:04PM (#15592127)
      As long as he does not claim that Doom has turned 10. When THAT happens, I'll feel really old.
    • Insert Ob "My God, now I feel old" comment.
      Shut up, shut up, shut up...
    • Indeed (Score:3, Informative)

      by PhrostyMcByte (589271)

      The single-player was fun, but the real accomplishment of Quake is bringing in the era of deathmatch.

      And it's still alive and.. well.. ok, so it's just twitching. I got this game the week it came out (wow, I was 10yo then) and havn't stopped playing since. Connect to oc9.org with your QuakeWorld client [fteqw.com] for some fun :)

      It's the arcade-ish physics meant to run on 10 year old cpus that differenciates the game from modern ones, and actually makes the game more fun to play. Your skill in multiplayer depend

      • Re:Indeed (Score:4, Interesting)

        by drinkypoo (153816) <martin.espinoza@gmail.com> on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:13PM (#15592198) Homepage Journal
        The single-player was fun, but the real accomplishment of Quake is bringing in the era of deathmatch.

        To me the major accomplishment was that it had co-op play. Unfortunately, it totally failed to usher in an era of co-op. Playing Quake with two or three people (or Doom for that matter - it's not like Quake was the first FPS with that feature) was just riotous fun. I have played Q2 with the co-op mod, but it's buggy. Or it was then...

        • Re:Indeed (Score:3, Interesting)

          by PhrostyMcByte (589271)
          Yup, back with Doom the serial cable was god! The endless co-op games of Doom and Quake were awesome - no matter how many times you'd gone though the game, it was still fun if you had a buddy plastering baddies guts next to you. That ended with Quake, though. Quake 2's co-op felt somehow lacking.

          I wish ID would go back to their roots and stop making these single player tech demos :(
        • God, yes (Score:4, Interesting)

          by metamatic (202216) on Friday June 23, 2006 @05:41PM (#15592801) Homepage Journal
          I couldn't understand why nobody wanted to play co-op. To me, co-op is the only interesting kind of multiplayer game. Yet even now, the emphasis in online games is on deathmatches.

          Me and a bunch of friends against a seemingly unstoppable horde of alien scum--that's what I want in a game.
        • Re:Indeed (Score:3, Interesting)

          by donscarletti (569232)
          I remember back in highschool, every day we played quake co-op at lunchtime. We had 8 people playing through it on nightmare difficulty. Eventually we got to the point that everyone had an exact role to do and path to follow on each level. We managed to consistantly get through it in 40 minutes or so after a few months of doing it every single day. There's just something that co-op has over everything else, the level of screaming sitreps and orders across the room, the level of everyone thinking that they a
  • ...this came out when I was in college, and we too [wiw.org] were quite addicted. The article linked was written about six months later when we were good and jonesin'.

  • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:51PM (#15592014)
    I have a 486 Dx2/80 with a Diamond Stealth 64 2120
    > video card and I get 6.2 fps in the start. While in Duke 3D, I get well
    > over 30+ fps. Why is Quake so slow compared to Duke 3D?



    Ahh... the last time anything besides Windows Vista got compared to Duke Nukem.
    • by Anonymous Coward on Friday June 23, 2006 @05:53PM (#15592865)
      I have a 486 Dx2/80 with a Diamond Stealth 64 2120 video card and I get 6.2 fps

      Don't use a three year old S3 chipset video with a two year old Cyrix/AMD -- it is 1996 and Intel owns games.
      That 80MHz machine is no better than an i486/33 which is barely a shade better than AMD's i386/40.
      And Gateway2000 has had an under $2000 Pentium for 18 months now.
      Go back to your two year old, 64 bit Atari Jaguar.

  • by saskboy (600063) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:53PM (#15592025) Homepage Journal
    I used to run Quake I on a 486DX 80MHz with 8MB of RAM. It was fantastic when I upgraded to 12MB then 20MB. It was THE reason to get a Pentium computer.

    In recent years Unreal has replaced it as my favourite. I got my screenname [used on Slashdot now too] from playing Quake on dialup, and P2P with another local kid.
  • Happy Birthday! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Thrymm (662097)
    This game alone changed my gaming habits! Countless nights after the bar a friend and I would go out onto pubs and frag or try to frag all drunk! Or would just dial each other for 1 on 1 DM!

    Fun times!
  • by phaetonic (621542) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:53PM (#15592037)
    1) Quake 1 was released for $9.99 as shareware with the full soundtrack. It was able to be unlocked with a code, and so of course, keygens came out and enabled you to play the full version for $9.99 with the awesome Trent Reznor soundtrack in all it's glory. 2) When QuakeWorld came out, you could play with others anywhere at 600 ping and still be o.k with it. There was a few seconds delay, but you would essentially predict what you wanted to do. I remember I would turn, grapple against a wall, let go, and shoot hoping I was able to hit something. I don't remember broadband back in the day. I wonder what the next innovation will be that redefines video game playing.
    • That CD was awesome! It also had unlockable versions of Doom, Ultimate Doom, Final Doom, Doom 2, Heretic, and Hexen!
    • i still have that CD, i lost the keygen ages ago of course, but the soundtrack alone is well worth keeping the cd for
    • Been there, done that. Hey, I was a poor college student!

      Coincidently, I still have the soundtrack on my mp3 player. Which, interestingly enough, has more horsepower than the machine I bought to play Quake (with a student loan, I might add).

      I was playing qtest1 for weeks before the official release. My first real-world program was a utility that queried servers for the people playing on them. God, I miss that game.
    • When QuakeWorld came out, you could play with others anywhere at 600 ping and still be o.k with it. There was a few seconds delay, but you would essentially predict what you wanted to do. I remember I would turn, grapple against a wall, let go, and shoot hoping I was able to hit something. I don't remember broadband back in the day.

      I remember that well, I started deathmatching with DOOM - indeed, I setup my first LAN with college buddies just to play DOOM over the network (yet we could only ever have a max
  • Your excuse (Score:5, Funny)

    by aborchers (471342) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:55PM (#15592048) Homepage Journal
    (or at least, that's my excuse for being a day late with the news submission)

    I thought it was because you were using that Procrastnatr calendar thingy...
  • by Average_Joe_Sixpack (534373) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:56PM (#15592060)
    I like to think of the original Quake as my own personal Vietnam
    • Yeah, totally worth a semester of incomplete classes. Six months of Quake was good times. I'm sure my parents don't agree. Ironically, the combination of quake and linux is the real reason for my early jobs doing Unix admin. Doing work at PlanetQuake, then onto GameSpy, and then into the 'real world'... wow what a strange road.
  • by 9Nails (634052) on Friday June 23, 2006 @03:59PM (#15592083)
    For me, the game wasn't on until a little later a company called 3DFX released the Voodoo graphics card. Which you could install a front end called GL Quake to play Quake with arcade quality graphics. That, was a true game revolution for me. The full 3D engine, and liquid smooth graphics. I love it!

    Now hurry and get people to help out at http://www.quakeremix.com/ [quakeremix.com] !!!!!
    • I remember seeing GLQuake for the first time. It really blew me away. The thing that convinced me that 3D was the way to be was the effect where rockets became their own light source. I seem to recall reading that this effect was coded in 30 minutes on a bet.
    • and people complaining that you were hax because you could see them through the transparent GL water.

      goodtimes.

      2fort5 MegaTF ftw!!

  • "What a loooong, strange trip it's been..."
  • ...it's playable with 32 players on a single server when all the players (though not the server of course) are on modems. Quakeworld rocked my world then, and it still does. Let's also not forget how easy it was to mod; sure there were doom mods, but quake was the game that catapulted us into the wide world of modding.
  • Classic quotes (Score:4, Interesting)

    by Robotron23 (832528) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:04PM (#15592125) Homepage
    Some quotes for our own amusement and wistful recollection :);

    "Still have 486? Get a Pentium immediately!"

    "I have a 486 Dx2/80 with a Diamond Stealth 64 2120 video card and I get 6.2 fps in the start."

    "Am I the only person who just can't /stand/ things like heretic/duke's look up/down?"

    "Well over 30+ fps at start of Duke3d ? Thats top DX4-100 speed....actually I haven't seen a DX4-100 that tops 28."

    "There's an option, r_fullbright (1/0) which turns off all lighting effects and speeds up the FPS tremendously."

    Those were the days - further I can recall back to is the Voodoo 2, anyone have any further fond memories of the mid 1990s GPU situation?
    • Re:Classic quotes (Score:5, Informative)

      by stratjakt (596332) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:12PM (#15592190) Journal
      There were no GPUs in the mid 90s, the Voodoo/Voodoo 2 didn't have GPUs, they were mere rasterizers. The first GPU was nvidia with the GeForce 256, Aug 31 1999 [nvidia.com]. It took a long while for it to really catch on, since it's just as easy to do the 3d to 2d conversion in memory (CPU).

      The 3D engine used by Quake and Quake 2 was pure software, the CPU did all the heavy lifting geometry wise (and still does, for the most part). AFAIK, the 3d geometry part of it is still mainly CPU based, you can't just send every polygon in the world up to the GPU and expect it to sort the shit out in a timely fashion. BSP trees and face culling and all kindsa nifty hacks abound for such things.

      We had no fancy hardware T&L business or programmable pixel shaders, and that's how we liked it.

      I remember walking uphill 40 miles in the snow just to frag newbies with my nailgun.
    • I remember getting the Voodoo rush rather than a Voodoo. It was slower, sure - but it could do acceleration in a *window* rather than needing to run full screen! *sniff*
    • The early 3d cards had no GPU. Only the $2,000 for running studioMax.

      I had an S3 virge and it was a 2d video card back in 1996 with some 3d effects that could speed gameplay.

      The vodoo1 is what brought true fast 3d performance. I think nvidia was coming out with the tnt at the time but I am not too sure as 3dfx was all the craze then. A few months after quake was released a new version with opengl called glquake came out. Its the only way to run quake on NT these days besides winquake and the graphics looked
      • Absolutely; apologies for that mistake. An intriguing aspect of Quake I is the sprites - they are crafted in full 3D, and it appears ID put much emphasis and precedant on the said sprites. There was a truly fearful air about the chainsaw wielding ogre and the eerily groaning zombies - something which intrigued me for a long time (longer than pre-TES Oblivion nearby details in terms of terrain quirks and items) were the hanging corpses from the walls.

        These instiled a macabre fascination - especially when the
    • Those were the days - further I can recall back to is the Voodoo 2, anyone have any further fond memories of the mid 1990s GPU situation?

      What is this "Gee Pee You" of which you speak? My DX4/100 has a video card with a rasterizer on it, and there is a CPU on the motherboard...and I can run a display in 16-bit color!
    • Voodoo2 SLI! Not that I could afford it. I spent all my hard earned babysitting money on a Matrox Millennium and it wasn't even a real 3D card!
      • Yeah, I think the first graphics card I bought was a Millenium II. Nice card for 2D work.

        My graphics card in this machine has about 6 times as much memory as my PC did back then :)
      • Heh, my first experience with 3D hardware was the Matrox Mystique my brother bought. Brought it home, couldn't get MDK to run decently, went back out the same day to get a Voodoo. The translucent rosy-pink-orange platforms from MDK are the first thing I remember really being impressed by in terms of 3D accelerated graphics.
    • anyone have any further fond memories of the mid 1990s GPU situation?

      When quake came out, 3D cards were pretty much non existant. (I don't recall if the S3's Virge 3D decelerator was out, yet, but it wasn't supported and pretty useless either way). I think the first 3D card to support Quake was the Verite 1000 through "VQuake". Then 3DFX came out with their Voodoo card which could run GLQuake and 3D gaming was never the same.
      • Then 3DFX came out with their Voodoo card which could run GLQuake and 3D gaming was never the same.

        True - it is strange really; from the 1998-2000 era it is hard to recall individual fascinations post-initial 3D situation. It is mainly the small details that capture the mind; things such as flame effects; water in pixelated droplets from Lara Croft post-swim; the sky backgrounds of Counter-Strike and Quake III; the intuitive low polygon rendering of varying terrain fixtures - TR II's take on Venice (as in V
    • Re:Classic quotes (Score:3, Informative)

      by PhrostyMcByte (589271)
      My first 3d accel card was a Diamond Voodoo Banshee. Top of the line card, for $150. Playing GLQuake with it was incredible.
  • by aymanh (892834) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:05PM (#15592137) Journal
    Happy birthday Quake!

    And thanks to Id for releasing its source code [idsoftware.com] under GPL, because of this, the game is still being played and mod'ed after 10 years of its initial release, check Tenebrae [sourceforge.net] for example, which adds modern rendering techniques like per-pixel lighting and stencil shadows to the original game.
    • What would be extra cool would be for them to release the original PAK files (ie; the full version game) for free, it can't be worth anything to them at this point.

      Tenebrae was what I was thinking of when I posted a link to DarkPlaces, but it's another good version of Quake with fancy new graphics.
  • by shoolz (752000) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:09PM (#15592173) Homepage
    I still play the original Quake. Nothing has every really come close to the "arcade-y" feel of Quake. The controls were tight, and the game was pure fun. I encourage you to honor Quake's 10 year aniversary by re-installing it and playing for an evening.

    Put it on nightmare, type +mlook into the console and let er rip. Not many games can be enjoyed 10 years after their initial release, but Quake stands above the crowd.
  • 88mph (Score:5, Funny)

    by linvir (970218) * on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:09PM (#15592174)
    I was about to post a reply in that thread, you know, to send a message back and boast about how good our computers are here in the future or something, but apparently [google.co.uk]...
    Sorry...
    You cannot reply to this topic because it is more than 30 days old or has been closed by a moderator.
    Please return to the main page.
    And I was gonna get so much cred with my 'amazing' Pentium III laptop... anyone know when Google will be implementing this feature?
  • Descent. (Score:5, Funny)

    by KDR_11k (778916) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:22PM (#15592253)
    I grew up on Descent instead of Quake. Now I'm immune to motion sickness.
  • Damn I feel old.

    I remember downloading Quake on my brand new Pentium 133 with 32mb of ram laptop on an ultra fast 56K modem!

    I remember getting fragged all the time by ISDN guys though because my crappy connection, but then I went to college and got a T1, but by then Quake 2 came out and the fun happened all over again.
  • Just another bit of remeniscing but I can barely believe it was 10 years ago that me and a group of friends used to stay behind after class in college in the most powerful computer room in the college, with the lecturers blessings, to fire up Quake and frag for a few hours. Both on the LAN and over the net cause back then the place had a relatively fast internet connection!

    Oh those were the days!
  • Quake beta (Score:3, Funny)

    by Kedjoran (812649) on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:49PM (#15592449)
    Ah, Quake was a classic. My brothers had gotten their hands on the beta version of it before it had been released. The Twist? It had no enemies in it. Imagine how fast it became boring.
  • Quake Done Quick (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Denny (2963) <slashdot@@@denny...me> on Friday June 23, 2006 @04:57PM (#15592504) Homepage Journal
    This seems like a good time to mention something I ran across again a few days ago - Quake Done Quick. These guys finish the whole of the original Quake, on Nightmare difficulty, in 12 minutes and some seconds. Incredible.

    Check it out: http://clanservers.multiplay.co.uk/?p=/ftpfiles.ph p%3Fpid%3D%26fid%3D953 [multiplay.co.uk] (BIG .avi)
  • Back when 'bloatware' wasnt even a word, and you could surf with out being bombarded wtih advertisements at every turn.

    Sure it was dialup but today 1/2 of our bandwidth is sucked up by garbage anyway.
  • Attention, Mac users (Score:3, Informative)

    by Stormwatch (703920) <rodrigogirao@@@hotmail...com> on Friday June 23, 2006 @05:00PM (#15592524) Homepage
    Quake and Quake II updates for Mac OS X --- Fruitz of Dojo. [fruitz-of-dojo.de]
  • by ilyanep (823855) on Friday June 23, 2006 @05:10PM (#15592588) Journal
    blah blah blah only lamers have 486s
    blah blah blah blah blah...


    Still have 486? Get a Pentium immediately!
    You remind me of those people who complained
    that DOOM was slow on their 386 when DOOM
    came out the first time.


    Wow I love reading old technical newsgroups...
  • by neltana (795825) on Friday June 23, 2006 @07:13PM (#15593290)

    If I remember correctly, it was either Quake or Quake II that played its music from the CD while you were playing. Of course, if you happened to have a different CD in there, it would play that music instead.

    I vividly remember playing when my kid had left one of his CDs in there. I'd move into a some section of the map and it would suddenly trigger "Do You Want to Buy a Bunny" or something equally horrifying. It really added flavor to the game.

    Even better was that it would repeat the song over and over until you left the section. I'm not really sure why I never took the CD out...I guess it gave me incentive to keep moving.

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