Forgot your password?
typodupeerror

Cloned Beef Coming Soon? 529

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the identical-steaks dept.
An anonymous reader writes "According to this article at Popular Science cloned beef may be coming soon. It talks about using meat within 48 hours of slaughter to allow cloning the best possible specimens, something that is not possible to determine while the animal is still alive. Apparently only 1 in 8000 animals is truly the best. Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal. That would end all the ethical issues with raising an animal for food, potential issues from mad cow disease, bird flu and whatever the next media induced panic is."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Cloned Beef Coming Soon?

Comments Filter:
  • I browsed through an old story, found the first post, and cloned it.
  • Tofu? (Score:2, Interesting)

    by ZiakII (829432)
    Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal.

    They have that its called Tofu.... honestly I don't see how you could "grow" meat.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by The MAZZTer (911996)

      That would require a lot of genetic engineering... I don't claim to be an expert on such things, but basically you'd have to eliminate the genes that grow everything but the meat. Then you'd have to give it sustenance somehow so it would grow.

      Of course, it would still be "alive" before killing it but just as much as plants are.

      • Stem cells? (Score:4, Insightful)

        by Kadin2048 (468275) <slashdot.kadinNO@SPAMxoxy.net> on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:03AM (#15975678) Homepage Journal
        I'm not much for biology, but if you figured out the way that various stem cells are "programmed" to grow into certain structures, couldn't you do it that way? That wouldn't require removing all the genetic information from the genome besides the "meat" portions, it would just require falsifying the messages that assumedly must be sent to stem cells that tell them what structures to develop into.

        Of course, I'm not sure that this would produce meat in the conventional sense that we think of it: a bunch of muscle cells in a jar wouldn't taste much like filet mignon, because they wouldn't be formed into those muscular structures, which are then exercised while the animal is alive, have a certain fat content, etc. In short, meat is more than just muscle tissue, it's a part of a particular animal. I have this feeling that the net result of trying to grow meat in jars would be closer to tofu than beef. Maybe it would be acceptable for foods that end up being processed beyond recognition anyway (hamburgers, sausage), but I doubt it would work for beef.

        If anyone who's more schooled in biology wants to fill in my misunderstandings, I'd be interested.
    • by awing0 (545366)
      They do it with goldfish:
      http://www.newscientist.com/article.ns?id=dn2066 [newscientist.com]
    • Re:Tofu? (Score:5, Interesting)

      by tentimestwenty (693290) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:13PM (#15975432)
      Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal.

      Personally, I would love to see us progress to the point where cows are well fed, happy and healthy. The meat will taste better, we'll be healthier and there's less cruelty to the cows. I would never eat meat grown in a lab.
      • Re:Tofu? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Verteiron (224042) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:26PM (#15975493) Homepage
        Why not?
      • by hcob$ (766699)
        Personally, I would love to see us progress to the point where cows are well fed, happy and healthy. The meat will taste better, we'll be healthier and there's less cruelty to the cows. I would never eat meat grown in a lab. We already have this, although it originated in Japan. It's called Kobe Beef. Only, its one of the most expensive meats on the planet.
        • We already have this, although it originated in Japan. It's called Kobe Beef. Only, its one of the most expensive meats on the planet.

          I can buy organic beef at my local supermarket for about double the cost of regular beef. There has to be some point between factory farms and organic farms which is still cost effective and can be marketed to the average consumer. We are seeing organic & "air-chilled", "premium" chicken breasts advertised on TV and these are evidently selling very well.
          • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

            by schon (31600)
            I can buy organic beef at my local supermarket for about double the cost of regular beef.

            Wow, you're getting ripped off.

            The organic beef at my local supermarket is only about 20% more than the "regular" type. My wife and I picked up two cuts from each type, and were surprised at how much more tender and better tasting the organic beef was. We've only been buying the organic beef ever since.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by rs79 (71822)
            "We are seeing organic & "air-chilled", "premium" chicken breasts advertised on TV "

            Don't be daft. In Amerika there are no breasts on TV.

      • Re:Tofu? (Score:4, Funny)

        by sunwukong (412560) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:29AM (#15975791)
        I would love to see us progress to the point where cows are well fed, happy and healthy.

        It would probably be more economic to just grow vat people with simple feeding requirements and a finger to push the factory button. That way the upper class could more efficiently use their vast resources to maintain their inefficient, old-fashioned naturally-grown selves ...
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        "Personally, I would love to see us progress to the point where humans are well fed, happy and healthy. The meat will taste better, we'll be healthier and there's less cruelty to the humans. I would never eat humans grown in a lab."
        Sincerely,
        Hannibal Lector
      • Re:Tofu? (Score:4, Interesting)

        by pacc (163090) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:28AM (#15976175) Homepage
        Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal.

        Personally, I would love to see us progress to the point where cows are well fed, happy and healthy. The meat will taste better, we'll be healthier and there's less cruelty to the cows. I would never eat meat grown in a lab.

        Why can't we just breed cows without brains, wouldn't that end all ethical issues.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Bombcar (16057)
      I think he's thinking more like Bob's invention!

      http://angryflower.com/vegeta.gif [angryflower.com]
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by Dahamma (304068)
      Leela: "Animals eat other animals. It's nature."
      Free Waterfall Junior: "No it isn't. We taught a lion to eat tofu."
      Lion: *cough* *pause* *cough*
    • Re:Tofu? (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Jeremi (14640) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:43AM (#15975863) Homepage
      They have that its called Tofu....


      I've tasted steak, and I've tasted tofu, and they are not the same thing by any stretch of the imagination.


      honestly I don't see how you could "grow" meat.


      I honestly don't see how they can pack a billion transistors onto a chip the size of my thumbnail, but somehow they do it anyway... fortunately human progress is not limited by the scope of any one individual's imagination.

  • Just label it. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by attemptedgoalie (634133) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:07PM (#15975391)
    I want the chance to vote with my dollars.

    I don't think we know enough about the process and long term issues to go nuts with this now. Test it. Test the hell out of it.

    But let me choose whether or not to buy it.
  • Just you wait.... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Gemini_25_RB (997440) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:07PM (#15975394)
    Even if we could "grow" perfect steaks without the rest of the animal, somehow the practice will be banned. Yes, I'm looking at you, animal-rights extremists and religious wackos.
    • by telbij (465356) *
      You have to admit the idea of a slab of beefing growing in a nutrient vat is pretty fucking creepy though.
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by MadEE (784327)
        Apperently you've never tried processed cheese.
      • Not to me, no, it's not creepy. In fact, I rather like the idea, because it suggests the possibility of better quality meat (not just beef, but pretty much anything) at a lower price and better availability. It might even be possible to set up such labs in areas that are severely protein and mineral deficient, and produce it rapidly enough to enable the inclusion of a reasonable quantity of meat in the diet for those that want it as an everyday thing.
      • After some of the sci-fi I have read, that is nothing. Plus, you don't think eating an animals muscle is kind of creepy? You have muscles too, you know, which, from what I hear, taste of chicken.
    • by PIPBoy3000 (619296) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:47PM (#15975602)
      It's far more likely that textured vegetable protein, which has had millions of years of evolution behind it, will end up be more efficient to produce than grown steaks. Another issue is that the stuff inside steak that's "tasty", also happens to be bad for you if it's a significant portion of your diet. Saturated fats and high protein diets seem to cause long-term issues.

      Now, I happen to be vegetarian, but certainly not for your standard ethical reasons. I'm all for animal experimentation, for example. I just find that our country's meat-heavy diet is expensive and inefficient. We're depleting our fresh water aquifers at a rapid rate, trying to grow feed for our cattle. American's waists are expanding, in part from our high-calorie meat diet.

      And, to end on a lighter note, here's a funny little story called They're Made Out of Meat [electricstory.com] that's hysterical.
      • by Daetrin (576516) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:56PM (#15975640)
        Now, I happen to be vegetarian, but certainly not for your standard ethical reasons. I'm all for animal experimentation, for example. I just find that our country's meat-heavy diet is expensive and inefficient. We're depleting our fresh water aquifers at a rapid rate, trying to grow feed for our cattle. American's waists are expanding, in part from our high-calorie meat diet.

        One of the _other_ big benefits of cloned meat would be that, once properly developed, it would consume far less resources to produce than traditional meat on the hoof. You wouldn't have to keep it around for as long before harvesting it, you wouldn't have to waste calories growing body parts that aren't of any nutritional use, and you probably wouldn't even need to waste resources growing grain or grass to feed it. You could grow a lot of it just using recycled organic waste.

        Furthermore with sufficient development in the technology you could probably grow healthier cuts of meat with less saturated fat and other bad stuff.

      • FUD (Score:5, Insightful)

        by drsquare (530038) on Friday August 25, 2006 @03:59AM (#15976382)
        Another issue is that the stuff inside steak that's "tasty", also happens to be bad for you if it's a significant portion of your diet. Saturated fats and high protein diets seem to cause long-term issues.

        Lean steaks are also tasty. The 'dangers' of fat are vastly overrated, the body needs fats to function properly. You'll find that excessive carbohydrates will do you more harm than anything. And a lack of protein is more dangerous than too much. You can eat 200g of protein a day without ill effect, but eat less and you end up losing significant strength.

        I just find that our country's meat-heavy diet is expensive and inefficient. We're depleting our fresh water aquifers at a rapid rate, trying to grow feed for our cattle. American's waists are expanding, in part from our high-calorie meat diet.

        Americans are fat because of too many processed foods filled with starch and sugar. The general health of Americans would be better if they cut out the donuts, cokes cakes, breads etc. and replaced them with more natural foods like steak, chicken and lamb. You only have to look at the sagging arms of most Americans to see they're not eating too much protein!

        Meat is not expensive or inefficient. There is enough land for everyone to have enough meat, no-one in America is starving. People probably eat less meat now than ever, so talk about depleting at rapid rates is sheer scaremongering.
        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by PIPBoy3000 (619296)
          Well, not that I'm a good sample size when it comes to statistics, but I lift weights regularly and most people consider me in excellent physical shape (6 foot, 185 lbs). I'm vegetarian, not vegan, so I do end up drinking milk, though not much cheese. I have a master's degree in biology and while you can find dietary experts claiming completely opposite things, I'd like to think that I've thought about things carefully over the last fifteen years or so.

          Processed foods are very much a problem. That inc
        • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

          by Insightfill (554828)
          The 'dangers' of fat are vastly overrated, the body needs fats to function properly.

          The body needs, IIRC, 3 grams of linoleic acid a day, plus some trace amounts from other sources. Most people get MUCH more than that.

          You'll find that excessive carbohydrates will do you more harm than anything.

          It's important, and you allude to it later, that the quality of carbohydrate is critical. Most Americans eat lots of WHITE processed flour and sugar. It's stuff that INSTANTLY triggers an insulin reaction, and

        • by Anonymous Coward
          "The 'dangers' of fat are vastly overrated, the body needs fats to function properly"

          Yes, we need very little fat though. Most people eat FAR more than needed, and we don't need any saturated fat, which is much worse for us, and is what you get from meat.

          "You'll find that excessive carbohydrates will do you more harm than anything."

          No, excessive calories from any source will make you fat. Excessive carbs that break down to glucose very quickly will spike your blood sugar, and its theorized that that may i
  • Growing meat... (Score:3, Informative)

    by winkydink (650484) * <sv.dude@gmail.com> on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:07PM (#15975396) Homepage Journal
    Unless you can exercise the meat that is "grown" it will be mostly tasteless.
    • Re:Growing meat... (Score:5, Informative)

      by Reality Master 101 (179095) <RealityMaster101@@@gmail...com> on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:17PM (#15975452) Homepage Journal

      Unless you can exercise the meat that is "grown" it will be mostly tasteless.

      Actually, it's exactly the opposite. It's fat that gives meat flavor, not lean "exercised" meat. In fact, Kobe Beef, which is widely recognized as tender and flavorful uses steers that are specifically fattenened up and never exercised.

      • by winkydink (650484) *
        It's a well-known fact that that beef cuts from working muscles (shoulders) are more flavorful than those that don't move that much (tenderloin). Yes, they are tougher, but proper cooking methods break down the collagen that causes toughness.
    • by ProppaT (557551)
      Actually, wouldn't it be veal?
  • There's no ethical issues with raising an animal for food with me. Keep your ethics to yourself, and I'll take the steak that once had legs.
  • pr0n (Score:4, Funny)

    by macadamia_harold (947445) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:09PM (#15975413) Homepage
    According to this article at Popular Science cloned beef may be coming soon

    That sounds like the plot of a b-horror-porn movie starring a resurrected John Holmes.
  • Panic! (Score:5, Insightful)

    by fm6 (162816) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:11PM (#15975420) Homepage Journal
    That would end all the ethical issues with raising an animal for food, potential issues from mad cow disease, bird flu and whatever the next media induced panic is."

    Yeah, right. Steaks made from clones. No potential for "media induced panic" there!

    • Re:Panic! (Score:5, Funny)

      by Reality Master 101 (179095) <RealityMaster101@@@gmail...com> on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:30PM (#15975508) Homepage Journal

      Steaks made from clones.

      Can't you just see the horror movie?

      Dr. Jackson stared in horror at the meat growing vats as he slowly realized what had happened. He felt growing nausea, his stomach threatening to turn his delicious former meal into a mouth-fired projectile.

      His assistant saw the look on his. "Dr. Jackson -- what is it? What's the matter?"

      He slowly turned to her. He couldn't help but imagine the juicy, tender beef passing her lips -- or what he thought was beef.

      "My God, Janice. It all makes sense. When I added the beef cells to the cloning solution -- the cut on my finger -- the blood, the blood THE BLOOD --" he couldn't continue.

      "No!" Janice screamed, her hands holding her mouth. "But -- that was months ago --"

      Dr. Jackson slowly nodded. "The entire East Coast has been eating -- ME!"

      • by addaon (41825)
        Consider "Stars in My Pocket Like Grains of Sand" for a slightly more mature discussion of this topic.
      • Dr. Jackson slowly nodded. "The entire East Coast has been eating -- ME!"

        And you say that like it is a bad thing. You know, cannibals say we taste of chicken, and I for one like chicken.
      • Re:Panic! (Score:5, Funny)

        by Jeremi (14640) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:27AM (#15975787) Homepage
        Dr. Jackson slowly nodded. "The entire East Coast has been eating -- ME!"


        Bravo! I'd definitely go see that movie! Make sure Samuel L. Jackson stars.


        OTOH, if and when human muscle can be grown in a vat, will the taboo against eating human flesh fade away? After all, it's not hurting anyone... I can imagine it starting as an outre stunt, and then becoming an underground thing, before eventually moving on to become a minor fashion, and eventually becoming a fact of life. Imagine the marketing they could do at the grocery store: "Genuine Paris Hilton breasts and thighs, $3.99/lb"

      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by Propaganda13 (312548)
        I was actually having that discussion a couple of weeks ago. The main questions that were asked:
        1. Would you eat vat grown meat?
        2. Would you eat vat grown human meat?
        3. Would you eat your body's meat grown in a vat?
  • And more ethical. No need to slaughter all those cows now (not that we really need to for our abundant food supply anyway). And there won't be the risk of getting CJD since there should be no neural tissue.
  • Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal. That would end all the ethical issues with raising an animal for food, potential issues from mad cow disease, bird flu and whatever the next media induced panic is."
    I'd like to see that too, but what does that have to do with this story?
  • by w33t (978574) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:14PM (#15975440) Homepage
    I was just talking about this the other day as I was enjoying a burrito. I love this idea so much, and yet there are those who find it somehow repulsive.

    How can growing meat be seen as more repulsive than the murder assembly lines at slaughterhouses?

    My more stable-minded vegetarian friends gladly welcome this - as their food choices are equally health and ethics based.

    Don't go thinking that all vegitarians hate the taste of beef. That red meat has got some major building blocks in it - and meat is a very good source of the basic building blocks your body needs.

    You can think of meat as "pre-fabricated" building materials for your body - since the animal who owned it before you has already done much of the work needed to convert the raw materials into useful proteins.

    I love this idea, I would much rather make my own meat than take it from a nice, innocent bovine who happens to be using it at the moment.

    And this actually brings up a somewhat...uh, weird question.

    If meat is a great building-block food - and certain meats are better for certain things...then might we design the "perfect" meat for human consumption?...if so, and this is the disturbing part, might we actually splice our own DNA into the transgenic mix?

    Could this be considered a form of cannibalism?

    Ah the future, so fun to turn everything on it's head.
    • by Biff Stu (654099) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:25PM (#15975491)
      Please contact us. We have employment opportunities for people who think like you do.

      Sincerely,

      The Soylent Corporation
    • by naoursla (99850)
      I read a science fiction story about that many year ago. Meat was grown in a vat and pretty much every imaginable type of meat had been grown and marketed -- including some extinct species. Some clever person came out with a mystery meat that turned out to be the best meat ever. It was eventually revealed to be human.

      I think the lesson there is to never eat anything labeled "mystery meat".
    • RTFA.

      Then discover that it still involves raising beef, then slaughtering them. In the meantime, they'll also be living on feed lots, and pumped full of hormones and anti-biotics just like they are now. Wonder why you've got nice tits, big boy?

      Vegetarians will have great problems with this. If you grow meat in a vat, it's not going to work. You need to have muscle, and that muscle has to be worked. Are you going to run it via an old Compaq running Windows 98? Here: have some of this stuff, we used the 2.6.
  • by cunina (986893) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:14PM (#15975441)
    Begun, this clone BBQ has.
  • Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal.
     
    Wouldnt this make the cowboy profession obsolete? And this comming from a self proclaimed cowboy?
  • Haven't McDonald's been serving that for years?
  • by qengho (54305) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:27PM (#15975495)

    Damn Interesting ran an article last year about NASA research into vat-grown meat for long space journeys [damninteresting.com]. It points out that "meat developed in this way is essentially a cultured muscle tumor", and so isn't very appetizing:

    "... one has to wonder whether these meat machines will become the source of cheap meat for the massive underclass of the future. The rich will dine on corn-fed Iowa beef while the poor masses slave away in the underground factories, lunching on cultured meat tumor-chow laced with obedience-enhancing drugs. It seems almost inevitable.
  • by lawpoop (604919) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:29PM (#15975507) Homepage Journal
    What about cloned sex workers?
  • by Twisted64 (837490) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:31PM (#15975511) Homepage
    ...as far as I can see, nobody has posted the Bob the Angry Flower comic [angryflower.com] yet. AWESOMELY funny and somehow totally on topic at the same time :-)
  • Delicacy (Score:2, Funny)

    by spurdy (590954)
    Cloned beef and cabbage. Yummm!
  • I don't think so. (Score:5, Interesting)

    by mrsbrisby (60242) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:33PM (#15975524) Homepage
    potential issues from mad cow disease, bird flu and whatever the next media induced panic is."
    I'm not so sure about that.

    Consider that the dangerous bacteria and viruses you're talking about, would only have a single organism to target, and we'd run the risk of a single lucky virus taking out the world's entire meat supply.

    Unless of course, they are right, and there is no evolution- and every organism is the same as it was when the planet was summoned into existence over the course of a particularly shady six day run. In which case, we have nothing to fear, because new viruses are not mutating into existance, and we only need to protect this meat from the dangers that exist right now and just wait until all the mad-cow viruses go extinct.

    I'm not sure I want to live in either world, so excuse me while I go take a chew on this helpless animal here.
  • ...but I would like to see them be able to grow chicken skin without the rest of the chicken. Properly prepared and crispified, it's the best part of the bird, clogged arteries be damned!
  • by wcitechnologies (836709) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:45PM (#15975588)
    Ethical issues? We've been raising animals for food for thousands of years, it has been one of the keys to our dominance as a species. Don't believe everything PETA tells you.
  • by Xaroth (67516) on Thursday August 24, 2006 @11:46PM (#15975595) Homepage
    Deja Food... the feeling that you've had this meal before.
  • Personally, I'd like to see this progress to the point where we can grow Shakey's Pizza restaurants without the use of embryonic stem cells.
  • by jellybear (96058) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:00AM (#15975660)
    The only truly ethical solution is to genetically engineer a cow that wants to be eaten. Preferably, the cow should be engineered to be sufficiently intelligent to go up to the diner and tell them how delicious it is, and ask them how they would like to eat it.
  • by TheSimkin (639033) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:00AM (#15975661)
    I am far more concerned about the long term effects on the genetic diversity of our live stock vs is it healthy to eat.

  • Long Pig (Score:5, Funny)

    by Ranger (1783) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:21AM (#15975760) Homepage
    Personally I'd love to see us progress to the point where it was possible to grow just the meat itself without the animal. That would end all the ethical issues with raising an animal for food, potential issues from mad cow disease, bird flu and whatever the next media induced panic is.

    Let's take it to next logical step. Why not clone human flesh? I mean after all there'd be no ethical issues involved with it. They could take those new ethicly created stem cell lines to make human meat. And since breast milk is the best, why clone giant boobies to produce all of our dairy needs. No I see no ethical problems at all.
  • by ThinkFr33ly (902481) on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:51AM (#15975895)
    I'm all for growing meat in a lab. The more meat, the merrier... but we can't even get farm raise salmon to taste right, what makes us think that meat grown in a lab is going to taste as good as a nice kobe beef ribeye?

    Gurgle... meat... gurgle. Damn, now I'm hungry.

    Might have the thaw that wild boar bacon I have in the freezer. That stuff is like crack, but with more cholesterol.
  • by redwoodtree (136298) * on Friday August 25, 2006 @12:51AM (#15975899)
    Damn, am I the only who read "corn beef" coming soon?

    Dang dang. Why isn't it coming soon?
  • by damburger (981828) on Friday August 25, 2006 @04:38AM (#15976472)
    Us plebs would be scoffing down crappy cloned meat which will probably kill us, whilst execs in their skyscrapers will be licking real organic gravy off the tits of $3000 call girls.

    Maybe I'm thinking too cyberpunk here.
  • by carvalhao (774969) on Friday August 25, 2006 @06:00AM (#15976691) Journal
    I find this topic funny altogether! Everyone always fusses about how the human species uses other "innocent" species for our own ends... such as survival. The interesting part is that, from an evolutionary viewpoint, we are not using cows or any other species any more than "they" are using us. After all, by feeding on chicken, for instance, we have created huge infrastructures that have allowed chicken to be, perhaps, more numerous that humans, turning them (again, from an evolutionary viewpoint) more successfull than the human species. Furthermore, we invest a great deal of resources to improve theses species, as oposed to what we do with our own (yes, shocking as it may be, medicine has spoiled natural selection for us). So, if you come to think of it, could it be that our livestock is actually using US?
  • Ethical issues? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by bigdavex (155746) on Friday August 25, 2006 @08:19AM (#15977108)

    that would end all the ethical issues with raising an animal for food, . . .

    I don't accept the idea that the cow would be happier never living. Never having been a cow, I can't really say. But to me, it seems ethically stronger to raise the cow as a creature (under reasonable conditions) rather than a meat culture.

    (I don't think this is what the article is discussing anyway.)
  • by Churla (936633) on Friday August 25, 2006 @09:48AM (#15977683)
    Do you realize exactly how much money and effort has gone into PETA marketing? Exactly how much time, love, caring, adn devotion those who work for the Meat is Murder cause have put in over the years?

    Just to have you throw it all away...

    With your cursed science...

    But think of the contrast, this could have religious extremists and PETA on the SAME SIDE in an arguement ;)
  • Bird Flu (Score:3, Interesting)

    by 16977 (525687) on Friday August 25, 2006 @09:52AM (#15977728)
    Cultured cells can grow virus just as easily as in vivo cells. Even easier, since they don't have the benefit of a thymus or bone marrow. That's why we learned how to culture cells in the first place.

% A bank is a place where they lend you an umbrella in fair weather and ask for it back the when it begins to rain. -- Robert Frost

Working...