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The Internet Businesses

Registerfly's Accreditation Terminated by ICANN 111

Posted by CowboyNeal
from the enough-of-that dept.
Punker22 writes "Effective immediately ICANN has terminated RegisterFly.com's accreditation. Between now and 31 March RegisterFly is required to unlock and provide all necessary Authinfo codes to allow domain name transfers to occur. Any and all registrants wishing to transfer away from RegisterFly during this period should be allowed to do so efficiently and expeditiously. 'Terminating accreditation is the strongest measure ICANN is able to take against RegisterFly under its powers,' Dr. Paul Twomey, President and CEO of ICANN said today."
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Registerfly's Accreditation Terminated by ICANN

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Saturday March 17, 2007 @08:27AM (#18385259)
    I've been trying to transfer my fiancee's small business domain from them over to DynDNS for about a month with no success. I tried initiating the transfer through GoDaddy's management tools (which seem to be really geared towards domain squatting, btw) and found nothing useful. It's a real rat's nest in there. Initiating the transfer from DynDNS got us nowhere. No transfer request notification is ever sent by GoDaddy, and everything silently fails a week or so later.

    She's so frustrated with it that at this point, she'd rather wait for the domain to expire and just re-register with someone else. Understanding how easy it is for someone to snatch up a freshly expired domain, I'm thinking that's a bad idea.

    Has anyone else had a similar problem (or success?) trying to transfer away from GoDaddy? We are running out of ideas.
    • by elmarkitse (816597) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @09:06AM (#18385519)
      Have you tried calling into GoDaddy? Whenever there's an issue I can't resolve online, calling them produces great results. Try to lay off the 'you work for soul-less domain squatting evildoer company' when you ring in and just mention you'd tried to do a few transfers with no success. Their CS people will give you their name, an e-mail, and a way to get back in touch with them unless someone treats them like crap.

      For domain management, their interface is great, especially if you have more than just a few domains. I have about 150 or so (no squatting, thank you) and basically just ignore everything about them except for the domain control panel.

      If you just want to use DynDNS services, just point the domain's nameservers and you've got all the benefits without what has apparently been quite a hassle for you. I have transferred in and out of Godaddy well over 50 domain names and the only times I've had problems are with odd TLD extensions, usually because I don't have the right auth codes, and almost always from the other registrar, not GoDaddy.

      Good luck

      EK
    • Political Issue (Score:5, Interesting)

      by Frosty Piss (770223) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @09:07AM (#18385527)
      A lot of people don't like GoDaddy because they gave up to pressure from some corporation or another and killed an offending domain. But I've had nothing but good luck with them. Their management tools are leaps and bounds better than many of the other services I've used, and just 100's of miles ahead of most of the free DSN joints. I've transfered dozens of domains without issue.

      Your dislike of GoDaddy for political reasons may be valid, but functionally, they aren't bad at all.

      • Re:Political Issue (Score:4, Interesting)

        by Nezer (92629) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @09:30AM (#18385665) Homepage
        I refuse to use GoDaddy simply because I find their television ads offensive and degrading to women.
        • by Dissman (997434)
          They do it because it gets attention. It gets them two kinds of media, both earned and unearned (paid for). Not only do they get the commercial, they get the press talking about it for a month. If it *didn't* get them attention they wouldn't do it.

          • by Improv (2467)
            That may be true, but it doesn't mean that people have to stand for it. If some attention-hungry kid on a playground acted that way, we wouldn't expect people not to shun them just because from a certain POV it's reasonable.
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward
          By that logic, WOMEN are degrading to women. GoDaddy advertises by using a big breasted model. Women dress provocatively, flash it all on myspace, go on webcams, wear practically nothing at clubs and when hanging around... why? To get attention, jobs, exceptional treatment. So I guess you don't like women, either... because they're offensive and degrading to themselves.

      • Wait till you accidentally forget to renew your domain. Each one is held hostage by an $89 "Redemption" fee.
        • Wait till you accidentally forget to renew your domain. Each one is held hostage by an $89 "Redemption" fee.

          That's why I have auto-renewal. It's a business, there to make money. NetSol is worse, but yes, I'll agree $89 is steep. On the other hand, if I forget about my domain for so long that I'm out of the grace period, who's fault is that?

        • by Skreems (598317)
          I was told the same thing, but when I went back to renew after the expiration period, there was no mention of that fee, and I wasn't charged it. I'm guessing the OP having trouble getting a domain away from them has the domain "locked" or something. Such a large and seemingly reputable company can't make a habit of ignoring transfer requests.
        • Read your TOS. You get up to 12 days pasty expiry before you have to pay anything more than your renewal rate. If you don't respond to the more than six emails you receive as the domain comes to, reaches, and passes its expiration date, you have noone to blame but yourself.
        • My domains auto-renew using my credit card. If your domains expire and you lose them then the only one you have to blame is yourself. You can renew domains well in advance if you want, or just set them up to auto-renew.
      • Re:Political Issue (Score:5, Informative)

        by VGPowerlord (621254) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @10:17AM (#18385943)

        A lot of people don't like GoDaddy because they gave up to pressure from some corporation or another and killed an offending domain.

        More accurately, they caved to a DMCA request from News Corp because a list of MySpace passwords were posted on the full-disclosure mailing list, which seclists.org archives.

        You can see the seclists.org posting [seclists.org] and the /. coverage [slashdot.org] of it for more details.

        What's more, GoDaddy offers to unlock domains it has shut down for a fee. I don't know about where you come from, but where I come from, we call that "extortion."

        Here's where things went wrong. (Note: IANAL) In order to file a DMCA with GoDaddy, GoDaddy's relationship with Seclists.org would have to be subject to one of the first four provisions of Title 17 Section 512.
        Those are:
        a. Transitory Digital Network Communications (i.e. network routing, No)
        b. System Caching (No)
        c. Information Residing on Systems or Networks at Direction of Users (No, it's not hosted by GoDaddy)
        d. Information Location Tools (Not by the definition given in this section, which is linking to it from a search site/directory)

        So, where is News Corp claiming to get this justification? For that matter, since when do passwords fall under copyright?
        • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

          by VGPowerlord (621254)
          I should re-read the articles I link to, seeing as they even say there was no takedown notice issued.
        • by wprowe (754923)
          Passwords are not copyrighted. They are a right of privacy. News Corp was protecting the privacy of its users, which it has a legal responsibility to do.
      • Lets see how much you care about their web interface if someone with a lot of money should start to dislike anything you do with your domain.

        Besides, how often does one really need to use the web interface at their domain registrar? Reneweing, transfering, updating the list of DNS servers for the domain... not things one does very often.

        • Besides, how often does one really need to use the web interface at their domain registrar? Reneweing, transfering, updating the list of DNS servers for the domain... not things one does very often.
          You're right, we should go back to the days when Internic made you use e-mail forms for all that shit. Ah, those were the days when updates took days or weeks and all domains were $35. People that pay $35 for a domain name are chumps.
          • You're right, we should go back to the days when Internic made you use e-mail forms for all that shit. Ah, those were the days when updates took days or weeks and all domains were $35. People that pay $35 for a domain name are chumps.


            I don't know about you, but I'll take those days over the days of loosing your domain to anyone who can write a DMCA takedown notice.

      • by daeg (828071)
        Except 90% of their "tools" are useless. Unless something has changed in the past year or so, you have to click through half a dozen pages of advertisement simply to renew a domain. YES! I'm sure I don't want to host with you! No, I don't want a shopping cart! No, I don't want "private registrations"! No, I don't want to renew other domains!

        If you're just looking to register domains with GoDaddy, their "tools" get in the way. Every page looks like it's designed by the same people that design glossy flyers t
        • by Tinik (601154)
          Their checkout page now have a link to "proceed straight to checkout" or something like that, skipping all their "special offers."
      • Re:Political Issue (Score:5, Interesting)

        by fermion (181285) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @11:13AM (#18386327) Homepage Journal
        Killing a domain is not a political issue. It is a bussiness issue. One cannot run a reliable service if there is a chance that your domain might be pulled for arbitrary "offensive content"

        That said, I have had no trouble with godaddy. The only reason I began to switch was thier increasing annoying registration process. It was just easier to register at another provider, a provider that gave extras for almost the same money. In particular I did not like the fact that godaddy encouraged people to register domains for the sole purpose of flipping them. I hate to want a domain only to find that someone has picked it up just to flip it.

        It was in fact that process of looking for a less hostile registration process that lead me away form Godaddy. One of the places I tried, cheapnames.con, looked very similar to Godaddy. On surmise,with no evidence, this lead me to believe that godaddy might be losing lots of customers due to customer service issues, and rather than fix the service, they created another firm to try to catch them on the backend.

        In the spirit of not putting all ones eggs in one basket, I have been using two registrars for the past year. I am now happy with the new provider, and recetly tried to move my last domain to the new provider. In spite of all my efforts, godaddy will not let me transfer. No matter. The domain expires soon, and I will not be in a hurry in go back.

        You see, there are no political issues, just customer service issues. Although I was happy at godaddy, another service gives me a better value with less annoyances. All too often the paranoid business community creates these conspiracies to cover up their own incompetence and greed. They think that the liberals or conservatives are out to get them, when in fact the business leaders have just let their personal political beliefs distract them from the core function of a firm, which is to provide a good value in goods and service to the customer. Pretty much more of the US is agnostic enough not to care if the CEO is worrying the sheep, as long the value is good. It is, more often than not, the short sighted firms that brand themselves as "christian" or "conservative" or whatever in hopes of attracting those few people that shop on solely on the basis of politics. It can be a good strategy, because those people will buy the goods and services no matter the quality of price. Just look at Whole Food market, which I also like, but has gone down since it has become hip and mainstream political.

        • by johnlist (684331)
          I am actively looking for a replacement for my current registrar. Any way you can let me know which two registrars you are using now?
      • by hendridm (302246)
        I don't like GoDaddy's control panel. I always thought it was clunky getting to the DNS records (A, CNAME, etc), and navigation was goofy. Also, I think their WHOIS Protection/Privacy service is quite a bit more expensive that some of their competition.

        Beyond that, at least you can be comfortable with registering a domain with a company that will probably be around for awhile. And although I've heard some complain about their customer service, I gotta figure it can't be any worse that some of the crap I'
      • You like their control panel?? I hate that slow,clunky thing with all my heart.I liked their previous one much better.
        And coupled with all the Godaddy horror stories Ive been hearing lately, its making my decision to transfer my 50+ domains to namecheap and moniker (never keep all your eggs in one basket).
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by Lord Omlette (124579)
      Might be able to find help @ nodaddy [nodaddy.com]...
    • Go to http://godaddy.com/registerfly [godaddy.com] and get a special rate and they'll petition ICANN directly for you.
    • by dindi (78034)
      If it is expired, you are screwed, if not:

      go to "manage domains" -> click domain ->

      1. unlock it: "domain lock" on the right unlocks it
      2. get auth code: domain contact information -> see bottom
      2. make sure email is yours. If you used domain privacy, it points to support@registerfly.com, thye never answer mails or approve requests

      I used Joker and successfully xfered 2 of my most important domains, 30 more to go.... I lost a few it seems as they are unchangeable and not renewable.

      So Joker works, bu
    • by fm6 (162816) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @11:36AM (#18386575) Homepage Journal

      I tried initiating the transfer through GoDaddy's management tools (which seem to be really geared towards domain squatting, btw)

      Well, duh. That's what happens when you make domain registration an open market. Registration is not a complicated product, so the only way vendors can compete is price. The natural result is a service like GoDaddy which charges a few bucks for a single registration, and provides a corresponding level of service. And why is it news that they facilitate domain squatting? They (and a lot of other registrars) have been advertising cheap bulk registrations for years. And why shouldn't they? If we say, "Compete any way you can", this is the natural result.

      If it were up to me, we'd go back to one having one registrar that charges $35/year for every second-level domain. No, better yet, raise it to $100 a year. Allow the registrar a reasonable profit, and put the rest of the money into something useful: research, or bridging the digital divide.

      Shazam! No more domain squatting. It's not longer profitable. And that single registrar has every incentive to provide good service: if they don't, they lose their cash cow.

      "No way! Why should I have to pay that much for my personal domain name??!!" Hey, if a vanity web site is that important to you, you should shell out. If not, get a third-level domain. When a web site contains nothing but family photos and rants about gun control, nobody cares whether its on JoeBlow.com or JoeBlow.CheapISP.com.

      But of course that's never going to happen: ICANN couldn't possibly stand up to all the whinning that would result. So we're stuck with the current situation, and there's no use complaining about companies like GoDaddy. So you're just going to have to live with domain squatting. And remember that when it comes to registering your domain, you get what you pay for.

      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by mike2R (721965)
        sheesh, next your going to say that there should be some point in the different tlds, with .com used by commercial entities etc. Maybe you'd actually like these rules to be enforced!

        Where would the internet be today if we allowed it to be based on sensible, commonly agreed, standards?
      • by evilviper (135110)

        one registrar that charges $35/year for every second-level domain. [...] Shazam! No more domain squatting. It's not longer profitable.

        Except for the fact that domain squatting started, and was the most prevalent, back in the old days, when that was EXACTLY the situation. More money means fewer typo-domains, and the like, but squatting any common name/brand URL is guaranteed to return tens of thousands of dollars.

        nobody cares whether its on JoeBlow.com or JoeBlow.CheapISP.com.

        Except you're now at the mercy

        • by fm6 (162816)

          Except for the fact that domain squatting started, and was the most prevalent, back in the old days...
          You mean there are fewer domain squatters now than 10 years ago? Who told you that, Elvis?
      • This is insightful?

        Registration is not a complicated product, so the only way vendors can compete is price. The natural result is a service like GoDaddy which charges a few bucks for a single registration, and provides a corresponding level of service.

        GoDaddy is not a monopoly. Nobody is forced to register through them. If you don't like the level of service you get from GoDaddy, go somewhere else. If there's a demand for higher levels of service (with correspondingly higher fees), someone will provid

      • by Reziac (43301) *
        The big problem with your concept is that joeblow.cheapISP.com is only good until cheapISP.com goes tits-up -- then Joe Blow not only has to find new hosting, he ALSO has to retrain his entire audience to go to joeblow.newISP.com

        Second, not all noncommercial domains are "vanity domains". Many are very useful to their owners and site-visitors, as a means of sorting out content by type and/or topic.

        The real cure wouldn't be to raise the price of the ordinary domain out of the average person's reach -- that's
        • by fm6 (162816)

          The big problem with your concept is that joeblow.cheapISP.com is only good until cheapISP.com goes tits-up -- then Joe Blow not only has to find new hosting, he ALSO has to retrain his entire audience to go to joeblow.newISP.com

          And for the typical vanity site, that's not exactly a big deal. You just have to tell the 20 or so people who access the site that the URL has changed!

          Second, not all noncommercial domains are "vanity domains". Many are very useful to their owners and site-visitors, as a means of so

    • Really, most of them are all the same. Took 3 months to get one of our old domains transferred from Register.com to our main registrar at work. That included numerous emails, phone calls, and at least two "do overs" starting the transfer process from scratch because "Something went wrong, sorry but you are going to have to re-submit the request". I can't even describe how frusterated I was with the process.
  • Great we know the outcome... bur how about a link to the REASON as well. "Management Issues" doesn't seem like something to yank a certification over.
  • Tucows (Score:4, Informative)

    by KonoWatakushi (910213) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @08:28AM (#18385265)
    Now, if they would only follow suit with Tucows.

    I have a domain at with of their resellers which can not be contacted. (In fact their site certificate expired last October.) Unfortunately, Tucows offers absolutely no recourse, and the phone number listed in the whois will let you sit on hold forever, and eventually (after an hour or so) spit you into a voicemail box, which goes unanswered. Likewise, the email contact forms simply forward to the resellers. Very useful.

    The reseller is domainsnare.net, which is also related to mailsnare.net. Not recommended...
    • Now, if they would only follow suit with Tucows.

      In your situation, Tucows is closer to eNom, with domainsnare.net serving in the RegisterFly role. Apparently [slashdot.org], RegisterFly used to be an eNom reseller, got dumped by eNom, then went through various gyrations en route to being canned by ICANN.

      From your description, it sounds like Tucows doesn't handle deadbeat resellers as well as eNom (which apparently contacted RegisterFly's customers and gave them transfer options). However, I don't think the actions of

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by funfail (970288)
      What is the exact problem? You can try logging into your control panel directly at the OpenSRS (Tucows) site, skipping the reseller:

      https://manage.opensrs.net/ [opensrs.net]

      The same username & password that you use with the reseller should work.
      • While OpenSRS's interface is clunky, at least you have this option.
      • by 6ULDV8 (226100)
        and if the reseller locked the domain?
        • Then you can unlock it in OpenSRS. At least take a look at it before you babble on.
          • by ffsnjb (238634)
            I wish OpenSRS would allow unlocking. I have 2 domains registered back in the day at TPP Internet in Australia. At the time, they cost $5US each to reg, now they want close to $80US to renew. TPP's control panel doesn't have the ability to unlock, either. So I'll be forced to wade through their customer support hell to get them unlocked so I can transfer to Godaddy with the rest of my domains.
          • by alexburke (119254)

            Then you can unlock it in OpenSRS. At least take a look at it before you babble on.

            Actually, I'm an OpenSRS reseller, and us resellers have the ability to suppress the lock option from being displayed on manage.opensrs.net. If your reseller has configured their stuff that way, you will not be able to lock or unlock it yourself.

            You can tell whether or not this is the case by logging into manage.opensrs.net with your domain name, username, and password, then clicking "Domain locking" -- if you see the following text, your reseller has prevented you from doing this yourself:
            NOTE: Locking ca

    • by nostriluu (138310)
      Further to funfail's message that you can log into the opensrs console directly, bypassing your "registrar," you can also email compliance @ opensrs.org to get your domain unlocked.
  • Just goes to show you how strange the Internet is, i say there should only be one person that does the registration of domains, and not all these half-baked companies
    • That was how it used to be. If you wanted a domain, you could register at Network Solutions and pay $35/year. I'm generally happier with the state of affairs now, though I wish people would go after squatters and domain snatchers.
      • by QuickFox (311231)

        I wish people would go after squatters and domain snatchers.
        Don't hold your breath. On the contrary, they're being actively encouraged — by the "Do No Evil" giant, no less [google.com]. It's a disaster.
      • by fm6 (162816)
        Oh, right, you want it to be really cheap to register domains, but you don't like squatters. Can't have it both ways, dude.
        • Sure you can. Cheap to register one domain, progressively more expensive to register additional ones.
          • by mike2R (721965)

            Sure you can. Cheap to register one domain, progressively more expensive to register additional ones.

            But you have to make a definition of an entity in order to assess that, and lets face it, there are plenty of ways around that. Any solution to that is going to be such a hassle to implement I doubt it's worth doing.

            Better IMO to have a reasonably large fee to register a decent tld (eg .com) - enough to discourage squatters but no more, and have cheap tlds that people can use for other purposes.

    • by iaculus (1032214)
      Wouldn't "one person that does the registration of domains" be a single point of failure? imo the internet's greatest strength is how distributed everything is. Remember how everyone was suggesting wikipedia solve their bandwidth woes ( link [slashdot.org]) with a P2P-based hosting system? On a tenuously related note: During my brief fling with SEO, a lot of people were claiming that domain name just isn't that important any more. Being on the first page of relevant google searches is going to do a lot more for most sites
    • by Dun Malg (230075)

      Just goes to show you how strange the Internet is, i say there should only be one person that does the registration of domains, and not all these half-baked companies
      You mean like it was when Network Solutions did it? Back when you had to provide your own nameserver and manage your own DNS? Great for those of a technical bent with access to a nameserver, but useless if all you wanted was a domain name pointed at your DSL IP address.
  • With Registerfly. Glad to see they finally get what they deserve.

    (The problem was around December last year and was fixed without the help of Registerfly. Fuck 'em.)
  • by Oshawapilot (1039614) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @10:07AM (#18385873) Homepage
    FWIW the Registerfly main page still displays the ICANN logo, and based on a little experimentation a short while ago it seems that I could still register a domain there if I was so foolish to want to give them my money.

    They seem to be taking that letter very seriously.
  • Effective immediately ICANN has terminated RegisterFly's right to use the ICANN Accredited Registrar logo on its website.

    Funny how they [registerfly.com] seem to be paying no attention whatsoever. In fact if you look at their site its just business as usual... I wonder if this constitutes phishing now.

    Really all I want to know is what happened to th $6000 chihuahua [wikipedia.org] and if someone will manage to pick up Michael Jackson's website because the news is always exactly 758.34% more entertaining when Whacko Jacko and chihuahuas are involved.

    • by hattig (47930)
      I doubt they have many employees now. I certainly know that if I was a developer at that company I would have left by now given the past month or two's shenanigans. It's probably just a few admin staff and people working out their notice period now...
  • Namecheap (Score:3, Informative)

    by baadger (764884) on Saturday March 17, 2007 @10:39AM (#18386101)
    See where you can find your EPP auth codes in the RegisterFly control panel [ducea.com]

    I had heard very good things about Namecheap [namecheap.com] for sometime so I transferred all my RegisterFly domains there this morning and everything went smoothly. For those interested in Namecheap, use coupon code "marchmadness" to get $7.99 transfers instead of $8.88. This coupon code isn't associated with me in anyway.
    • I use Namecheap as well, and always use a similar coupon code. Never had a problem with them, and they seem to have a good reputation unlike most of the competition.
    • This is interesting:

      In the article, there's this quote:

      Effective immediately ICANN has terminated RegisterFly's right to use the ICANN Accredited Registrar logo on its website.

      (snip)
      "Terminating accreditation is the strongest measure ICANN is able to take against RegisterFly under its powers," Dr. Paul Twomey, President and CEO of ICANN said today.

      However, over at registerfly.com, we see:

      http://registerfly.com/info/benefits.php [registerfly.com]

      "Quick Facts

      Founded in 2000
      ICANN Accredited
      100% Debt F
  • I feel terrible for those people whose records are actually lost; keeping their domains will be next to impossible. It seems like, with that many contracts in play and the willful destruction of data, that Kevin Medina ought to be liable for at least money, if not jail time...
    • ICANN had already invoked the "provide backup copy of registrar data" provision of the Registrar agreement, which requires that, on demand, any registrar provide ICANN with a backup copy of the registrar's data in a standard format. RegisterFly didn't comply.

      That data isn't lost, though. There's a source of backup WHOIS data. Try DomainTools [domaintools.com], which maintains copies of all WHOIS and DNS data. So if you need to prove domain ownership after RegisterFly shuts down, there's a way.

  • It's amazing. Several years ago I had about 20 domains with them. I transferred there from another eNom reseller because I fancied their WHOIS Protection service (I believe they were one of the first to offer it. GoDaddy had it at the time, but it was $9/year. RegFly had it for 99 cents on sale).

    Anyway, I was happy with their features and price for quite a long time. Their control panel always had some issues, but I still thought it was a good deal. Then, about a year or so ago, they really started su
  • I just saw on their site a pop-up.. RegisterFly refugees can use the promo code "FLYAWAY" to get a year of their L1 hosting (like 200GB of storage, 2TB of transfer/month, free registration) for free from now until the end of the month..

    I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of other registrar/hosts do things like this to "help out" what's left of their customer base!
    • I wouldn't be surprised if a lot of other registrar/hosts do things like this to "help out" what's left of their customer base!

      If I may put in a plug for my registrar - Namesdirect, a/k/a Mydomain.com. I've been with them for eight years, smooth and stable operation. Recently had a problem transferring a domain name from 1&1internet to Mydomain, but after an email and phone call, they straightened it out.

      While I have no experience with the registrars mentioned here, I think the problems described are bound to happen when a business tries to sell its product or service too cheap. This is why I won't deal with Godaddy. Their

      • Re:NamesDirect (Score:3, Interesting)

        by stevel (64802) *
        You must have either a short memory or you missed out on all the fun. NamesDirect suffered a massive meltdown of its DNS servers a few years back, leaving hundreds of thousands of domains in the dark for a week or more. They did not have sufficient capacity or redundancy in their servers and did not communicate with their customers for days. Perhaps it's better now, but as soon as I could, I transferred my domains out of there and would never return.

        The registrar I've had the best luck with is eNom, thou
        • by SkyDude (919251)

          You must have either a short memory or you missed out on all the fun. NamesDirect suffered a massive meltdown of its DNS servers a few years back, leaving hundreds of thousands of domains in the dark for a week or more

          I guess I did miss out! I've never used their DNS, opting to use the servers my employer uses.

          That's a most unfortunate event but I hope Namesdirect has learned their lesson, and that others have learned from it too. Technology can fail, but the failure to address an issue with one's customer is inexcusable.

  • The co- owner's were gay lovers and after there personal relationship soured things went south. One of the partners wanted to buy into RF for 500,000 and the transaction went all the way to having the stock shares printed and than the jilted lover did not cough up the 500,000 and that was when he made the allegations of lipo and prostitutes and fancey cars as he stole the company right out from under the owner Kevin. Kevin took him to court and the the court rightly ruled that Kevin's partner's stock was nu
  • I noticed last week, that GKG.NET [gkg.net] is offering all RegisterFly customers a chance to transfer to them for only $5.99. That's better than GoDaddy's $6.95 price. I see that they have also lowered their transfer price from $7.49 to $6.95!

    Not bad. I have all mine at GKG, and have never had a problem with them.

  • I just logged into my Registerfly account and saw a popup with this text:

    Yes Indeed, RegisterFly's Security HAS been breached, we are helping RegisterFly's VICTIMS to Regain control of THEIR Legally Owned domain names. KEVIN MEDINA! Dont try anything stupid, we have VERY sensitive DATA about you, and we are ready to publish it anytime soon, blackmail may be your first thought, but it is victory for your victims. With all our love, The Registerfly's Hackers.

    Not sure of the implications of this. We'll have

Whom computers would destroy, they must first drive mad.

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