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IE7 Released and Available for Download 586

Posted by samzenpus
from the here-it-is dept.
Luis Escalante writes "After over a year and a half, IE7 has been released to the public as of Monday afternoon. Download it directly here. Word hit the streets after several mangers of the IE division posted on the IE blog."
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IE7 Released and Available for Download

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  • by TommydCat (791543) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:04PM (#16495747) Homepage
    in 3..2..1...
    • "funny" but true (Score:5, Insightful)

      by User 956 (568564) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:05PM (#16496331) Homepage
      It's completely telling that the first comment on that page, is a comment by a guy who's worried IE7 is going to trash his computer [digitaltrends.com].

      If that's the first reaction people have, firefox has a pretty good chance.
      • Re:"funny" but true (Score:5, Interesting)

        by shmlco (594907) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:35PM (#16496599) Homepage
        And in typical Microsoft fashion, downloading and installing an internet BROWSER requires... what else? That you reboot your computer.

        Maybe it IS integrated, after all...
        • Re:"funny" but true (Score:5, Interesting)

          by compupc1 (138208) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @01:52AM (#16497647)
          IE 7 is actually less integrated than IE 6 was. However, the IE rendering engine is provided as a library for other applications to use. Any other applications that have embedded browser controls depend on IE -- and as they should. Applications should not have to deal with HTML rendering on their own. I would imagine this would cover everything from help systems to chat clients to things like the Add/Remove programs dialog.

          Since other browsers don't come pre-installed on Windows computers, IE tends to be a neccesity (whether Windows should make it easier for applications to rely on other 3rd party browsers is a separate issue). As such, a system reboot is neccesary as the rendering engine itself, exposed as a library, must be updated. Basically it just ensures nothing is using the browser control at the time of update.
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by Anonymous Coward
            While this may be true, it is possible to determine if other programs currently have your (old) library loaded up, and if they don't, you can safely replace it. Yes, it's even possible that one might ask the user to terminate the specific programs that are using the library, and if they don't want/can do that at the moment, to schedule the update for the next boot up.

            What is amazing is that there are installation programs who can do this, and they work very, very well (for me). Barring some very strange cod
          • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

            by masklinn (823351)

            However, the IE rendering engine is provided as a library for other applications to use. Any other applications that have embedded browser controls depend on IE -- and as they should. Applications should not have to deal with HTML rendering on their own.

            As such, a system reboot is neccesary as the rendering engine itself, exposed as a library, must be updated. Basically it just ensures nothing is using the browser control at the time of update.

            Yeah, code hotloading is for t00pids

          • I can understand that a reboot is necessary, given the details you provide. However, don't you find it embarassing that a browser install requires a reboot?

            I double-boot Windows and Linux at work. I use mostly Linux (SuSE) and their automatic update feature is quite painless - you only have to reboot on kernel updates, which aren't that common. However, it always pisses me off when I restart to Windows and I have to restart another 10 times to install all patches that came out in the meantime. This is god

          • Re:"funny" but true (Score:5, Interesting)

            by /ASCII (86998) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @06:04AM (#16498917) Homepage
            A perfect example of why the filesystem model in Windows is broken.

            The kind of issue you describe is solved automatically by the filesystem on Unix systems. If one process deletes a file that is opened by any process, then that file will be unlinked from the filesystem, but remain useable to the process that was already using the file. The file is not actually deleted from disk until all processes stop using it.

            Among many other things, this means that you can safely upgrade a library, or even a program, that is running. The old processes will keep running the old library with no issues but any new processes that are created will automatically use the new one. Once all old processes die, the space used by the old library is returned to the filesystem.

            There are gotchas with the 'Unix way', like correctly handling configuration files that are only open on startup and shutdown, but these issues can be handled with a bit of care.

            Under Linux, people routinely upgrade Firefox or even the X windowing system while the programs themselves are still running. Afterwards, they simply restart the program in question to run the new version.
    • by moresheth (678206) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:20PM (#16496447)

      What's that sound?

      Oh yeah, it's thousands of webmasters scrambling to test their sites on the latest mutilation of web standards.

    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by jamie (78724) *
      ... zero [secunia.com]
  • by QuantumG (50515) <qg@biodome.org> on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:05PM (#16495759) Homepage Journal
    of course, I would have prefered them to have released it before I bowed to management and hacked around all the non-standard shit in IE6 which IE7 fixes. urg!
  • by atomicthumbs (824207) <(atomicthumbs) (at) (gmail.com)> on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:06PM (#16495769) Homepage
    I'll use Firefox (and OPera, if a plugin for Stumbleupon is released for it) for the rest of my life. Failing that, I'll use the worldf's most secure broswer: Mosaic 1.0!
  • by Guido del Confuso (80037) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:07PM (#16495777)
    Word hit the streets after several mangers of the IE division posted on the IE blog.

    It's official--IE7 is the web browser used by Jesus!
  • User interface? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by FlyByPC (841016) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:11PM (#16495829) Homepage
    So can the WMP-inspired interface be made to go away, and the interface made to look like a real Windows app (with the menu bar, and IE6-style controls etc?)

    I think I'll stick to Firefox, thanks.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by sabernet (751826)
      Wow...I'm usually the last bugger to defend MS, but you can indeed show the menu by right clicking and checking "Menu bar".

      Not there by default though.

      I must admit, IE7 ain't bad. Still gonna use FF or Flock(for shared bookmarks) for now though.
  • IE6 keeps crashing due to all of the spyware/malware/trojans that installed themselves.

    ;-)
  • Agent: Thank you for calling tech support, how can we help you? Customer: I just installed an update to IE and my internet is now broke. Agent: *sigh* You're only the 500th person in the last hour to call, there's not much we can do call M$ since their sad attempt at catching up with the times is too little too late and to boot it wasn't done as best as possible. I suggest you use FireFox instead! Customer: What's FireFox? Agent: You know how girlfriends are better than wives? Customer: Uh... sure. A
  • A year and a half? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by gumpish (682245) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:14PM (#16495865) Journal
    After over a year and a half, IE7 has been released
    I hate to break it to you Luis Escalante, but IE 6 was released in August 2001.

    (Yes, strictly speaking 5 years is "over a year and a half", but the point remains.)
  • Anyone know (Score:5, Funny)

    by kihjin (866070) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:15PM (#16495877)
    ... when the Linux port will be available? ;)

    *ducks*
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by ashwinds (743227)
      Two weeks after apple releases the safari port.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by Techtoucian (779127)

      This is a decent question. I'm a web developer, and the only reason I use Windows is to make sure Internet Explorer renders things properly. Sure, IE7 is a gigantic step up, but it's still not to the point I can say "Well it works in Opera and Firefox, therefore it'll work in IE."

      Unfortunately it's not looking too likely we'll see Wine being able to run Internet Explorer any time soon, thanks to the bundled Windows Genuine Advantage software. There's lots of implications in emulating a "genuine" Windows m

      • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

        by joebutton (788717)
        I'm a web developer, and the only reason I use Windows is to make sure Internet Explorer renders things properly.

        You probably know this already, but anyone in a similar position should definitely check out ies4linux [tatanka.com.br]. IE6 / 5.5 / 5.0 only so far I'm afraid, but it works very well.

  • Competition (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Concern (819622) * on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:16PM (#16495887) Journal
    Once again, competition wins. Microsoft, after leveraging their monopoly power to win the browser wars, had summarily decided that there was no longer anything else in IE that needed work. IE was effectively frozen for years, bugs and all - cracked open, by stern policy, only for security fixes.

    It took a free software effort with no hope of profit to do so, but MS has at long, long last bestirred themselves to code again. This has once again demonstrated the baseline of what MS' monopoly will do. Since it is not economically feasible to confront MS's monopoly powers, the commercial market for product X (browsers, office apps, OSs, etc) is effectively destroyed (sorry Opera), but at a minimum, MS is forced to compete against what the community can develop for free.

    Never forget - human beings are lazy by design, and so are our organizations. No business, no politician, no religious leader, will exhibit much virtue except under threat. This is why competition and democracy have been largely effective as policy.

    Whether MS wins or loses the browser war (or these days, the browser cold war), or the OS war, we have already won, because we have pushed them to innovate, to make their products more stable, more credible, and more powerful.
    • Re:Competition (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Kelson (129150) * on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:36PM (#16496111) Homepage Journal

      And best of all, Microsoft has realized they have to keep going [microsoft.com]:

      Dave Massy (Moderator):
      Q: Now that IE7 is nearing completion, can you give any information on how regularly you plan to release future versions of IE?
      A: We definitely plan to release on a regular basis. Exactly when the next release will be is difficult to predict adn we still have plenty of planning and work to do. You can be assured that it will not be 5 years until the next release of IE though :) we are plannign the next two versions now.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:25PM (#16495973)
    www.ie7.com [ie7.com]
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by MidKnight (19766)
      That's friggin' beautiful. According to whois, it's been registered since 1999 by a UK gentleman; well done! I wonder how long 'till the lawyers descend....
  • Ugh. (Score:3, Interesting)

    by hsmith (818216) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:27PM (#16495985)
    Is all I have to say as a developer and business owner. Add this into the mix of shit I have to fix.

    Plus, watch out, it is reported that it will be a forced update November 1st. So less time than normal to ensure the final version is kosher with your web apps!
  • by mybecq (131456) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:28PM (#16496011)
    ... after several mangers of the IE division posted on the IE blog.
    Several cattle and horses also tried to post, but they were quickly herded back into the cubicles.
  • Automatic Updates (Score:3, Informative)

    by MrP- (45616) <rob@elCOBOLitemrp.net minus language> on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:47PM (#16496197) Homepage
    Remember, the final date to set up any blocks so it doesn't automatically download is November 1, after that IE7 will be installed as part of Windows Updates
  • CSS Opacity (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Ark42 (522144) <slashdot@morpheussoftware. n e t> on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:53PM (#16496241) Homepage
    If IE5.5+ supports "filter: alpha(opacity=50);" why couldn't they be bothered to add "opacity: 0.5;" CSS supoprt to IE7. At least they got the Alpha PNGs working good enough now. Also the <input type="button"> still renders with tons of extra padding you can't get rid of, even with padding: 0px; so buttons still show up super large in IE compared to all the other browsers.
  • by MightyYar (622222) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @10:55PM (#16496257)
    Hmmm, I can't seem to find the Mac version. I guess I'll have to keep using 5.2. I don't see it for HP-UX or Solaris, either. I wonder if this is a mistake, or if those rascals at Microsoft are up to something?
  • by Chapium (550445) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:14PM (#16496401)
    Did anyone notice its Windows Internet Explorer 7 and not Microsoft Internet Explorer 7?
    • by Overly Critical Guy (663429) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @01:56AM (#16497661)
      Yeah, it's so that when you load up Vista for the first time, your Start menu will be jam-packed with Windows Internet Explorer, Windows Mail, Windows Media Center, Windows Media Player, Windows Live Messenger download, Windows Calendar, Windows Defender, and more.

      The marketing group controls Microsoft now, which makes sense since the guy leading it, Ballmer, is a marketing guy. It's the reason we have 14 versions of Vista coming out.
      • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

        by ndansmith (582590)
        Actually I think that the change of brand from "Microsoft" to "Windows" has to do with anti-trust litigation. "Microsoft Internet Explorer" is a separate browser unfairly bundled exlcusively with a monopolistic OS. "Windows Internet Explorer" is part of the operating system itself. It may be a silly game of legal semantics.
  • Tabs! (Score:5, Funny)

    by BeeBeard (999187) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:26PM (#16496511)
    Guys, you've gotta try this tabbed browsing! Have you ever seen anything like it before?!?

    *wink*
  • My First impressions (Score:4, Interesting)

    by BLACKtactx (1015407) on Wednesday October 18, 2006 @11:28PM (#16496531)
    1: Opening Multiple Tabs (more than 20) Crashes
    2: UI is TERRIBLE - why???

    File / Edit / View menu:

    Displays below the address / nav bar, a break from convention from every windows app Ive used in the past. A break from convention is good if its progress, this is just change for change sake, it flat out doesn't work!!!!

    Command Menu:
    Uses Real Estate that could be used for tabs. I want my home button beside my back and forward buttons. I cant convert to a classic view instead of the half baked attempt at a UI, or change

    Navigation (back forward reload etc)
    Should be grouped together.

    I could go on. The fact is, Microsoft have locked me down with this software to a specific experience regarding its UI. I cant change the size of icons, nor the position of toolbars etc. Why not MS??.
    Its a joke, and I havent even started playing with CSS in it yet. I was hoping for MS to listen to the cries of the RC users regarding toolbar management, they obviously didn't "hear us"
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by TopSpin (753) *
      locked me down with this software to a specific experience regarding its UI. I cant change the size of icons, nor the position of toolbars etc. Why not MS??

      The mostly unmovable toolbars is the first thing I noticed. The second thing is that the /. main page doesn't render correctly.

      It's a mess. Firefox et al have nothing to worry about.

      • by Crayon Kid (700279) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @03:38AM (#16498245)
        The second thing is that the /. main page doesn't render correctly.


        Which brings home an interesting point. Are we going to see complaints that "IE7 doesn't work right" because of millions of sites using IE6-specific hacks? I mean, "they" used to pull that crap with Opera and Mozilla and Firefox a lot, claiming it was their fault. Can't wait to see the downfall this time, when IE7 gets a taste of Microsoft's own medicine.
  • by wile_e_wonka (934864) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @12:23AM (#16496951)
    Be forewarned that installing this version of IE7 is nothing like installation of RC1.

    The 14 MB download seemed a bit large, but acceptable for MS. But I wish it warned me about the time for intallation.

    First, the installer started up and did its normal thing. It downloaded updates--kind of odd for something released today--and tried to install extra software. Then I figured things were about done. In grand MS tradition, it required a computer restart--annoying, but I'm used to it from MS.

    Then came the real trouble.

    During the restart the IE installed hijacked the entire computer for 10 or 15 minutes. I wish it warned me before the restart that this it was going to coninue installing before I could use the computer--then I would have waited to restart until I had time. For 10 minutes the installer reached into the depths of my computer and sold its soul to Microsoft, and that was all before it installed the "Core Componants" of IE7!

    Then it forced a computer restart, and then the computer was finally usable by me again (after another little pieces of work by the installer).

    On top of all this, the installer never gives any indication as to how far along in the process you are--so you have no idea that it will be another 15 minutes or more while the installer copies the entire contents of your hard drive onto MS servers. I guess I've been spoiled by Opera--2 painless minutes and it's over. Basically; if you really want IE7, do it when you have time. Get dinner or something while its installing.

    Just a warning.
  • Nasty CSS Bug (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Temujin_12 (832986) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @12:52AM (#16497205)
    I ran into a nasty bug the other day on a site I'm developing at work. The gist of it is that certain tags ([span] and [a href] tags) shift around strangely when zooming in and out. For an example, go to www.flickr.com, search for something that returns several pages, scroll to the bottom where the pagination links are, and zoom out to 90% (CTRL mousewheel). As of the last IE7 release before this one, IE7 zoom renders flickr's pagination links virtually useless. The work around, which only partially works around the problem, is to define a site wide CSS style of "zoom: 1;" for your tags. This is only a partial fix and causes other irregularities on your site when zooming. Seeing how this occurs on the latest release of IE7, I doubt they've since fixed the problem. Way to go IE team! [slashdot.org]

    The real fix is to revert your entire layout into tables and not use divs and spans. I just put "zoom: 1;" in my style sheet then marked it as "WONT FIX" blaming IE7 and the fact that reverting to tables is a dumb idea (especially when only a fraction of users will depend on the zoom tool).
  • by akuzi (583164) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @01:38AM (#16497571)
    Most of IE 7 seems to be functionality already found in Firefox, but I do like the new Quick Tabs feature (Ctrl-Q). This shows a mini version of all the tabs currently open and allows you to select one, in a similar way to Expose on OS X.
  • Virtual PC (Score:3, Interesting)

    by ValiantSoul (801152) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @02:37AM (#16497859)
    DO NOT install this in virtual pc under Windows 2003 Enterprise (or possibly XP). On boot the Virtual Machine User Services crash immediately (not sure what this affects) and Internet Explorer will crash immediately on start. Without IE6, I have no way of getting Windows updates...

    Especially don't do it if your Windows license is from MSDNAA (academic) because you only get 1 activation which is not renewable. In other words, I'm screwed. (Mac user, just have Windows for testing my web sites in IE, and no I will NEVER pay to get a copy of M$ Windows)
  • by wjramsey (461694) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @05:14AM (#16498723)
    Here's my experience:
    1) Install IE7 since it's out of beta - downloads and installs in about 2 minutes.
    2) Reboot PC - 1 minute
    3) Enable menu bar - 2 minutes trying to get it to move to the top. Nope
    4) Try to change search engine to Altavista - 2 minutes - exception thrown just typing a letter in the search menu.
    5) Remove IE7 - 2 minutes
    6) Reboot - 1 minute

    (I guess I might have also added the about 5 minutes svchost ran my cpu to 100% after the first reboot)

    How horrible..... :(
  • by jez9999 (618189) on Thursday October 19, 2006 @06:47AM (#16499093) Homepage Journal
    We hear reports of huge numbers of corporate machines using a warezed XP key to allow them to install Windows en masse; huger numbers of people in countries in Asia, etc. that can't afford an official copy of XP and so warez it.

    How widely will IE7 be installed? I think a relatively large percentage of the Windows userbase will be unable to install it because of the WGA stuff. You might end up with a long term 50/50 split between IE6 and IE7.
  • by Glenn R-P (83561) <randeg@alum.rpi.edu> on Thursday October 19, 2006 @08:45AM (#16499891) Journal
    In http://pmt.sourceforge.net/gamma_test/ [sourceforge.net]
    on a normal PC, the GIF, JPEG, sRGB patches and the unlabeled patches
    should match gamma=1/2.2 but they match gamma=1/1.96 instead.
    This foils attempts to match images with backgrounds and images in other formats.

    The workaround is to remove the gAMA chunk from PNG files while preserving
    the sRGB chunk.

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