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Comment: Re:Canon 1Ds (Score 1) 669

by toddestan (#46797049) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

I've got a Canon TX that's still in good working order, except that I can't get batteries anymore for the built-in light meter (it requires a mercury cell that's long out of production for obvious reasons). And unlike the 1Ds, the TX was the low-end budget model of day, lacking a 1/1000s shutter speed and the self-timer. Still, not bad for nearly 40 years old.

Comment: Re:Funny story (Score 1) 669

by toddestan (#46796973) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

Guess it depends on what part of the world you're in. In America, in the early 70's Subaru was still experimenting with importing micro-cars such as the Subaru 360, something that didn't work out particularly well for Subaru. For that matter, I don't remember them lasting very long on American roads.

Comment: Re:Anything built before 2001 (Score 1) 669

by toddestan (#46796931) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

Well, Hyundai has come a long way. On the other hand, compare a mid-90's Toyota Camry to a new one. The new one may have a lot more gadgets and features, but the 90's Camry is a much more solid, better built car whereas the new ones are basically what's left after 15 years of decontenting and cost cutting.

Comment: Re:Plumbing... (Score 1) 669

by toddestan (#46796885) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

I've heard someone say that some of the first water mains put in back around 1900 were designed to last 100 years or more. The ones put in before WW2 were designed to last about 75 years. The ones put in during the boom in the 50's and 60's were designed to last 50 years. And the more recent ones starting from 70's are designed to last 30 years. Which means that today we've got something like 80-90 years worth of water mains which are all about at the end of the design lifetime. Something to think about.

Comment: Re:Commodore Amiga 3000T (Score 1) 669

by toddestan (#46796765) Attached to: Ask Slashdot: What Tech Products Were Built To Last?

I've got one of the slightly newer Sony "Dream Machines" that uses the backlit LCD. I use it for a clock in the office, as the radio part barely works anymore. The daylight savings time button on it, however, is pretty innovative and I've always wondered why no one else has copied it. Push it in the spring to advance the clock by and hour, and push it again in the fall to set it back an hour. Simple and elegant.

My alarm clock in the bedroom is a GE clock radio from sometime in the early 90's with the red LED display, fake woodgrain, and 9V backup. Still going strong.

Comment: Re:Depends (Score 1) 253

by toddestan (#46795923) Attached to: SSD-HDD Price Gap Won't Go Away Anytime Soon

I would expect "worker bee" machines to go SSD at some point, probably soon. The reason is hard drives are not going to get cheaper, as it costs a certain amount to build such a complex mechanical device, which seems to have set a price floor of about $50 no matter the capacity. SSDs do not have this limitation, so as soon as you can get a "good enough" SSD for less than $50 I would expect SSDs to replace hard drives in "worker bee" machines. My guess is about 80GB should be good enough for OS + applications + scratch files.

Comment: Re:It was a "joke" back then (Score 1) 275

You can buy a 4K monitor today for $700. And it's not some Korean mystery brand either:
http://accessories.us.dell.com/sna/productdetail.aspx?c=us&l=en&s=bsd&cs=04&sku=210-ACHO

One thing that isn't obvious though is that it's a 30Hz monitor. All the 60Hz ones, as far as I can tell, are still in $1000+ territory.

Small is beautiful.

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