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Comment: Re:Problems? Really? (Score 1) 663

by hdparm (#40355367) Attached to: Torvalds Slams NVIDIA's Linux Support

Well, they certainly do subscribe to MS goals and visions and release the driver in a way that's appropriate for Windows platform.

Having said that, nVidia is by far the best (the only actually) solution for Linux. We run bloody flash animations and videos 24/7 on cheap atoms - if it wasn't for nVidia ION we couldn't be anywhere near to being competitive. Although it would be nice to have a built-in support, it's not exactly rocket science to rebuild the modules for different kernel. We do it all the time - nVidia driver install provides the infrustructure (precompiled kernel interfaces), we build it once, then distribute via yum/rpm to hundreds of client sites via nightly yum update, reboot and everything else taken care of automatically. Never failed us.

Comment: Re:Try CentOS (Score 1) 354

by hdparm (#35387708) Attached to: Debian Is the Most Important Linux

CentOS is not binary compatible with RHEL, CentOS is RHEL, sans RH branding stuff.

I agree with you - since Debian inception, lot has changed in where and how Linux is used. So Fedora, being the base upon which RHEL is built seems to be the the most important one these days. Some will argue that it's not community driven though.

Comment: Re:16 times? Strange metric... (Score 3, Informative) 175

by hdparm (#33104110) Attached to: First GNOME Census Results

Oh, FFS.

Superiority of APT over RPM? Get a clue. You can compare APT and YUM and how well they manage whatever packages your distro of choice have.

Fedora 13 installs everything I need for the laptop out of the box - wireless driver, mobile modem driver, even bloody compiz works on ATI mobility card without any additional requirements. YUM is rock solid for ages now. The only extra thing needed is rpmfusion repos to get proprietary codecs going.

Comment: The real reason (Score 2, Insightful) 828

by hdparm (#33089114) Attached to: What's Wrong With the American University System
The discussion ranges from entrenched tenured professors more concerned with publishing and parking spaces than quality teaching

My daughter yesterday received her Masters Degree from the Auckland University of Technology (NZ). Guest speaker at the event was eminent New Zealand scientist Dr Ray Avery. One of those brilliant scientists who actually did some great things and provided for underprivileged around the world.

He also has a lot of experience teaching at some of the best known schools. The one thing he underlined in his speech yesterday was the fact that New Zealand students have a big advantage to the most of the places he visited in being taught by educators who not only are of the highest professional calibre but people who, almost across the board, have retained the most important attribute of any educator at any level - their humanism.

Now, if indeed there is something wrong with the high education system in the USA, I'd suggest this would be the starting point in fixing it.

Comment: Re:Average grandparent? (Score 1) 331

by anyGould (#32212672) Attached to: Shall We Call It "Curated Computing?"

I wonder what we will compare techno-prowess against in 30 years when the first crop of slashdotters rocks the cradle of their first grandchild...

Oh, yeah, I forgot: most Slashdotters won't reproduce.

Well, I've got a 3-year old, and as long as she's curious about the world, I'm not fussy about what tools she uses in her exploration.

Comment: Re:Absolutely! (Score 1) 1138

by bobaferret (#32212632) Attached to: Too Many College Graduates?

I have one point of contention.:
or go to a private school and rack up mountains of debt for no guaranteed payoff.

I think you'll find that most private schools can be more affordable than state schools when alumni scholarships are figured in. State school push you to get student loans and like to raise tuition when sate funding drops out. Private schools on the other hand have worked very for a long time to keep their costs down and like to have a decent percentage of the students come from lower incomes. So they tend to go out of their way to give you scholarships. The college I went to hand 80% of it's students receiving some sort of tuition reimbursement or scholarship. Mine was 80% of my tuition, I didn't even ask for it. My point being don't rule out small private colleges as being too expensive, you have to look at what they give back.

Comment: Re:Democracy needs smart people (Score 1) 1138

by Archangel Michael (#32212612) Attached to: Too Many College Graduates?

uh huh.

When did shouting down a person become just "mocking". And I wonder if you'd feel the same way if a bunch of right wingers interrupted your favorite speaker to the point that they couldn't continue.

It is funny when leftwingers do stuff, it is excused various ways, but when rightwingers do the exact same thing, it is "off with their heads" (see Acorn Scandal reactions).

I can see the hypocrisy, even if you refuse to.

Comment: Re:Misleading: nuclear is excluded (Score 1) 79

by Iamthecheese (#32212174) Attached to: NASA Planning Lunar Mining Tests, Other New Tech
For a propulsion system to transport large payloads with short transit times between different planetary orbits: a deuterium fusion bomb propulsion system is proposed where a thermonuclear detonation wave is ignited in a small cylindrical assembly of deuterium with a gigavolt-multimegampere proton beam, drawn from the magnetically insulated spacecraft acting in the ultrahigh ultrahigh adj. Exceedingly high: an ultrahigh vacuum. vacuum of space as a gigavolt capacitor. other linky. This could be science fiction for all I know but it sure sounds like a blast ;-)

"Hey Ivan, check your six." -- Sidewinder missile jacket patch, showing a Sidewinder driving up the tail of a Russian Su-27

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