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The Comedy of Scott McNealy 125

Rob writes "News that Sun co-founder and long-serving CEO, Scott McNealy is stepping aside, heaps a load of pressure on incoming CEO Jonathan Schwartz - he will have to get working on his anti-Microsoft gags quick-sharp. Aside from Sun's strategy and his execution of it, McNealy's tenure as CEO will be remembered for his constant Microsoft sniping. CBR remembers some of his favourite quotes."
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The Comedy of Scott McNealy

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  • The Quotes (Score:5, Funny)

    by neonprimetime ( 528653 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:31PM (#15205562) Homepage
    A selection of the best Scott McNealy quotes: "When Steve Ballmer calls me wacko, I consider that a compliment." "The only thing that I'd rather own than Windows is English, because then I could charge you two hundred and forty-nine dollars for the right to speak it." "Shut down some of the bullshit the government is spending money on and use it to buy all the Microsoft stock. Then put all their intellectual property in the public domain. Free Windows for everyone! Then we could just bronze Gates, turn him into a statue and stick him in front of the Commerce Department." "Microsoft is now talking about the digital nervous system... I guess I would be nervous if my system was built on their technology too." "It's the good guys versus the bad guys, and the good guys are winning." "W2K (Windows 2000) will be a bigger disaster than Y2K." "A giant hairball." [About Windows NT] "The Evil Empire." [guess who] "The beast from Redmond." [yup] "Anyone heard any good monopolist jokes lately?" "Ballmer and Butthead" [Ballmer and you-know-who] ".Not, .Not Yet and .Nut" [Microsoft's .Net strategy]
    • "W2K (Windows 2000) will be a bigger disaster than Y2K."
       
      At least he was right about something!
      • Actually, Win2K is probably the best release of Windows that MS has ever put out.
        • Re:The Quotes (Score:2, Offtopic)

          by drinkypoo ( 153816 )
          I disagree - I think Windows XP is better. Now granted, they've put all this genuine advantage crap all over it, even on the corporate version, but it really does have more features and many of the old features are improved, if no other way than by the revamping of the configuration GUI. Meanwhile, it is possible to slim XP down to the point where it's really not using more resources than 2k - but I don't even want to. I upgraded 2k to XP on my laptop so I could get cleartype, which is definitely a feature
          • More stable? 2K never crashed on me. XP crashes whenever I game on it. If 2K had decent support for SATA drives, I'd still have it on my gaming rig.
            • Well, I humbly submit that you were not exercising Windows 2000, because I have crashed it in so many ways it doesn't even bear repeating, except perhaps for the sake of humor like in cryptonomicon (yes I am a nerd kthx) where they're talking about poking what's her name, as in I have crashed it in the highlands and the lowlands, at home and abroad, et cetera.

              I've run both 2k and XP on all kinds of sketchy and non-sketchy hardware both, and crashed 2k more per time unit than xp, by far, even when using

            • I used W2k (and have since, but only as a server platform) as a home PC but stopped when I noticed that my games ran FAR faster on XP.
              I had been relatively anti-XP (it was initially rumoured to scan you for WaReZ, and so forth, which didn't make me too happy) but it really did benchmark a 33% increase over XP in most of my games.
              Heck, even the original UT. I never really investigated why this was; I just moved on.
          • Xp loses because of activation and distinct versions that aren't compatible.

            Windows 2000 was Windows 2000 wether it was a server flavor or Professional.

            XP is a cluster F*K of marketing crap. Home, Pro, MCE, N series, started edition, and they're acknowledging the Pirated edition with the recent nagware.

            Yes, there is software that won't run on MCE that will on Home and Pro.
        • indeed. i refused to switch to xp until late 2004 because i was that fond of my win2k installation. vista seems to be on the exact same path (no matter where it started) as xp was to win2k--shiney, new, ooooooooooh; please.
    • "Microsoft is now talking about the digital nervous system... I guess I would be nervous if my system was built on their technology too."

      and now it will ship with half of it's firewall turned off ...

      i have to agree, windows makes me nervous, that's why i keep away from it (and don't waste half of the working day fighting viruses like my colleagues do).
    • by dlawson ( 209945 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @01:10PM (#15205876)
      Best quote from Scott.

            I was a sales support engineer for a pretty big distributor. When they decided to get into Unix, we got a relationship with Sun to sell the Sun Connect line (mostly into the Fed.)

            Scott's best comment came out when MS got ready to ship Win 3.11 -
                  "Putting Windows on top of DOS is like putting whipped cream on a road apple." ... (road apples are horse poop, in case you didn't get the connection.)

      For years my .sig was "Scott McNealy was right."

      davel
    • McNealy launched a few more quips at "Wintel space heaters" and made a crack about taking Gates on a Dick Cheney-style hunting trip. "Kaboom!" he said.
    • Yup. We all know how wonderfully successful the *nix world has been at making useable desktop operating systems. I can hardly find a Windows machine what with all the Solaris workstations all over the place.

      (insert rolling eyes emoticon here)
  • by Penguinisto ( 415985 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:32PM (#15205570) Journal
    ...what will happen to OpenOffice and, oh, Java?

    While I suspect that Sun will likely make everything run as usual for at least a little while, at least we knew that with Management's full attention on calling Microsoft bad names, it at least insured that they wouldn't get any bright ideas ab't increasing sagging revenue by screwing with Java and/or all versions of OO.

    /P

    • by oscartheduck ( 866357 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:38PM (#15205623)
      A high up Sun representative was interviewed on LugRadio a few months back (I'm pretty sure it's this episode [lugradio.org] but I'm not one hundred percent certain) in which he categorically stated that everything Sun owns software-wise will be open sourced eventually, including Java.
    • by MOBE2001 ( 263700 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @01:08PM (#15205864) Homepage Journal
      it at least insured that they wouldn't get any bright ideas ab't increasing sagging revenue by screwing with Java and/or all versions of OO.

      There is no money in Java and not much future in Sun's other technologies. I posted this elseswere yesterday but it bears repeating. My advice to Schwartz is the following. Don't try to beat either Linux or Microsoft at their games. You will lose. I suggest instead that you do something that will take the rest of the industry completely by surprise. Invest your remaining resources and passion into the next big thing, the one thing that will solve the nastiest problem in the computer industry today: unreliability. Put all your money in non-algorithmic, signal-based, synchronous software. It will revolutionize both the hardware and the software industry and usher in the most dramatic change in computing since the days of Charles Babbage and Lady Lovelace. Don't say you weren't warned. ahahaha...

      Why Software Is Bad and What We Can Do to Fix It:
      • Unreliability? It kinda seems more likely that reliability issues stem from inadequate testing than from unreliable algorithms.
        But yes, if issues with the reliability of software are eliminated, I think it would be a good sign that software development as a field is becoming much more mature.
      • I've seen your posts before and skimmed over the well prepared documents on your COSA project. However I don't get the sense that even a tiny bit has been put into practice? Is there somewhere one could see anything implemented in this system you describe? If not, why not?

        Cheers.
        • Of course it hasn't been put into practice. If it had, been he might have realized by now that it's all BS. The entire idea is based on an unsound premise.

          It is every bit as easy to write buggy hardware as it is to write buggy software. We don't notice it as much because hardware companies do a better job of testing their products before shipping because (a) it is a lot harder to fix them after the fact and (b) it is far easier to return faulty hardware to the store than buggy software, so they are more
        • Is there somewhere one could see anything implemented in this system you describe? If not, why not?

          A small demo would not prove the main claim made on the site, IMO. The only way to prove something like this to a doubting Thomas would be to implement a full OS or a virtual machine with a visual dev environment. Send some money my way and I'll be glad to do it. :-) But even that would not do it for some people. Having said that, the COSA model is not rocket science. It is easy to understand. Besides, the val
          • I'll give a third option as to why someone might not be convinced: theory is one thing and practice is another. If I took the time to fully understand every CS theory out there when the creator can't even be bothered to implement a few examples, I wouldn't have time to make a living. Especially if it is as easy and obvious as you say, it shouldn't take all that much time.

            When I've come up with novel coding ideas in the past the first thing I do is post a proof of concept. That burden is really on the aut
      • by sfjoe ( 470510 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @02:37PM (#15206600)


        Your points are valid and would carry a lot more weight if you didn't start out with a stupendously dumb statement like, "There is no money in Java".
      • You state that hardware is more reliable than software because hardware is non-algorithmic and synchronous. This does not seem to be correct.

        Hardware is typically more reliable than software for the following reasons:
        1) Patching hardware is very difficult and expensive, so they get it right the first time. Patching software is cheap and easy, so they don't worry as much.
        2) Harwdare does have errors, have you ever looked at the errata sheets for CPU's?
        3) Hardware typically has a more limited set o
      • Put all your money in non-algorithmic, signal-based, synchronous software. It will revolutionize both the hardware and the software industry and usher in the most dramatic change in computing since the days of Charles Babbage and Lady Lovelace.

        Do you mean like Labview [ni.com]?
        • Do you mean like Labview?

          No. Labview does not go far enough (elementary instruction level) and does not have what I consider to be the two most essential innovations found in the COSA model: 1) Effector-sensor associations (eliminates blind code due to data and event dependencies) and 2) design consistency (eliminates logical contradictions).
  • by mmell ( 832646 ) <mike.mell@gmail.com> on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:35PM (#15205594)
    CBR Editor's Weblog

    Schwartz replaces McNealy: A tough comedy act to follow?

    April 25, 2006

    News that Sun co-founder and long-serving CEO, Scott McNealy is stepping aside, heaps a load of pressure on incoming CEO Jonathan Schwartz - he will have to get working on his anti-Microsoft gags quick-sharp.

    Aside from Sun's strategy and his execution of it, McNealy's tenure as CEO will be remembered for his constant Microsoft sniping. Anyone who saw him speak knows he always had a quiver of anti-Microsoft jokes up his sleeve. "I don't want my kids growing up in a world of control-alt-delete," was one of my favourites, or, "The bear is pretty strong in the computer business ... but we are outrunning the other hikers."

    As we reported in our full coverage of McNealy's decision to hand over to Schwartz here, McNealy said that, "When you start a company, you always wonder who you are going to hand it off to. You can't run it forever."

    "I wasn't going to hand it off when we were growing too fast," he continued, "I wasn't going to hand if off after the bubble burst. The time is right to do it now. All the demand indicators are strong. For 22 years, I have been running this joint, and I have had a lot of fun with it." He certainly has.

    McNealy has been a constant source of amusement in what might otherwise have been a far less interesting sector. He, and Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, have taken it upon themselves to poke constant fun at Microsoft, and in so doing have helped in their own ways to ensure that consumers have retained that little bit of cynicism about the world's most powerful software company.

    In his capacity as CEO McNealy was bright, witty, straight talking, and often with us hacks, more than a little belligerent. Perhaps that's unsurprising - McNealy once said in an interview with CBR that if he had not ended up running an IT company, he would have chosen instead to pass his time thwacking pucks and heads on an ice rink instead. I hear ice hockey is something of a contact sport. At times McNealy got pretty close to turning being a tech firm CEO into a contact sport, too.

    I remember one press roundtable in London a couple of years ago, where a journalist from the Financial Times found himself on the wrong end of McNealy's ire. When the journalist asked a question about comments that Sun's channel had made to him about the soundness of Sun's business model, McNealy retorted sharply: "I'm not going to comment on made-up quotes."

    Though the journalist insisted the quotes came straight from Sun's own resellers, McNealy snapped, "Like I say, I will not comment on made-up quotes." As us press began to leave the room McNealy again accosted the FT journalist, saying he was furious with his paper's editor for stories that had apparently said that McNealy's remuneration had been the cause of a board-room argument. "We haven't even discussed that - it's just been made up," McNealy said furiously.

    Anyway like I say if you want the low-down on McNealy's departure and his replacement, Jonathan Schwartz, simply visit our coverage of the news here. I chose instead to assemble a few of the best Scott McNealy quotes from over the years. I warn you though - he could never have given up his day job to become a comedian. Ice hockey, perhaps.

    A selection of the best Scott McNealy quotes:

    "When Steve Ballmer calls me wacko, I consider that a compliment."

    "The only thing that I'd rather own than Windows is English, because then I could charge you two hundred and forty-nine dollars for the right to speak it."

    "Shut down some of the bullshit the government is spending money on and use it to buy all the Microsoft stock. Then put all their intellectual property in the public domain. Free Windows for everyone! Then we could just bronze Gates, turn him into a statue and stick him in front of the Commerce Department."

    "Microsoft is now talking about the digital nervous system... I guess I would be nervous if my system

    • "The only thing that I'd rather own than Windows is English, because then I could charge you two hundred and forty-nine dollars for the right to speak it."

      Dang, if he owned the rights to English, just imagine how much money he could get by suing the people who abuse it daily for damages!

      (Sorry, this is probably about as funny as the quotes themselves.)

      • Honestly, I think I'm putting way too much thought into this, but... assuming you did own English, think about marketing it like software!

        You could have upgrades for every new generation of people... "Get all the new slang you hear from the young'uns! Only $149.95 with proof of purchase of a previous English Language Pack(tm)! (Upgrading from Olde English does not qualify)"

        Or you might have it based on a subscription model. "$49.99 per year entitles you to unlimited upgrades, so you can learn the new tech

    • by taniwha ( 70410 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:57PM (#15205763) Homepage Journal
      Sun that is ... there someone had to say it, sorry
  • by ChrisRijk ( 1818 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:38PM (#15205619)
    Or, if you'd like some freshly minted Scott:
    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2006/04/25/mcnealy_ex it_interview/ [theregister.co.uk]

    Among other things, he talks about how he tried to avoid being CEO of Sun in the first place. His first attempt at a replacement (Ed Zander) failed too.
  • wrong priorities (Score:1, Insightful)

    by Anonymous Coward
    maybe he should have spent less time thinking up of MS jokes and more time running his company, last time I checked, MS is getting bigger and bigger while Sun is heading towards of black hole.
    • I just checked [yahoo.com] It it seems both have been flat for a while altough Sun seemed to be more in the bubble then MS was.
    • Hear, hear!

      I always thought Sun spent way too much time bitching about microsoft instead of actually doing anything about it. McNealy's jokes always came across as a "we don't like them, but we don't have the balls or ideas to compete with them."

      So instead they've spend the last five years shedding money and employees, without coming up with any decent new ideas.
    • by Valdrax ( 32670 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @01:50PM (#15206229)
      Why exactly are we fondly remembering this guy? Everyone seems to be forgetting that one of his more notorious quotes was, "Privacy is dead; get over it." Rather than try to fix privacy problems, McNealy argued that we should just accept it, move on, and embrace the new privacy-less future (especially if it involves systems powered by Sun hardware).

      Don't forget that in the wake of September 11th, both him and Ellison were ponying up to offer their company's services in helping to create a national ID. He even calls lining up at airport security an "efficiency tax" that biometric IDs would somehow maaaaagically fix.

      I say good riddance.
      • Privacy is dead. It was a hack anyway. The real problem is the imbalance of access to information and power to act on it. If everyone had equal access and power, privacy would be a non issue. It's only because some people have more access to information and power to use information to harm others that privacy is necessary. He's just being pragmatic, privacy is dead and we nead to figure out how to address the real issues because the hack isn't working anymore.
      • Damn right. He also came up with a bizarre comment about RFID card to the effect of 'they' want to but an RFID tag everywhere, and even on your baby's bottom. It's not Big Brother, it's Dad.

        Not only did I find it distasteful but who are 'they' may I ask?
    • Right priorities. Regardless of how the companies make it in the future. He can at least grow older and say "Well, I sure as Sh!t had fun doing it whether I ran SUN into the ground or not!"
  • by hhr ( 909621 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:44PM (#15205656)
    While the constant MS bashing was interesting, I think it worked against Sun, and not for it. It sent the message "Buy Sun if you hate Microsoft." Like it or not, hating MSFT isn't a great way to run a billion dollar business.

    Do I get more rich and more happy just because I hate MSFT? No. I get more rich and more happy by making better choices that ingore (or include) MSFT as warrented.

    Red Hat gets this. McNealy should have sent the message "Buy Sun to solve problems X and Y and Z. That will put more money in your pocket and make you happier." Unless the Schwartz gets this, Sun will continue it's relative decline.
    • I wish I had mod points for this guy. Very good comments. I think this guy deserves and "insightful" tag, at least.
    • by menace3society ( 768451 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @01:18PM (#15205941)
      While it probably didn't help his case much, I don't it hurt him as much as you suggest. After all, people in charge of plenty of tech companies say bad things about or make fun of their competition (Steve Jobs, Michael Dell, Steve Ballmer). I think the real problem is that this seemed to be Sun's business strategy for the last 8 years or so. Instead of working on ways to make Java a better platform for users (instead of developers), it languished. The much-ballyhooed Java Desktop System hasn't materialized into anything special, and right now it looks like Looking Glass is ending up the same way. Until they released the Niagara, they were falling way behind in the computational power race. And unlike other computer manufacturers, they haven't branched out in any tangible way to supplement their revenue streams (like hp and Dell do with printers, cameras, etc). I guess they haven't had any real solutions to X, Y, or Z that couldn't be duplicated on cheaper hardware with a different OS.
    • "Red Hat gets this."

      IBM get it too, to a certain extent.

      HP and SGI instead got screwed in the opposite direction (possibly due to R. Belluzzo).

      Bottom line, let your competition define you and you become predictable and easily manipulated.

      "Unless the Schwartz gets this"

      Judging from Schwartz' various diatribes (whose lack of contact with reality sometimes leaves one embarrased on Sun's behalf), that, unfortunately, seems unlikely.
    • While the constant MS bashing was interesting, I think it worked against Sun, and not for it. It sent the message "Buy Sun if you hate Microsoft." Like it or not, hating MSFT isn't a great way to run a billion dollar business.

      I agree with what you're saying; whilst he was ranting about Microsoft, and making smart ass comments, customers were going, "oh, thats nice, Microsoft isn't your best friend - so where is the beef"?

      Before the nose dive in pofitability and revenue, an analyst came out and warned that

  • by Nooface ( 526234 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:48PM (#15205697) Homepage
    At the press conference where he wore the penguin suit, Scott took off the head to give his speech, and an aide rushed up to grab it and take it offstage. But Scott insisted that the head be left perched up on top of one of the props behind him. "I kind of like the way it looks up there", he said dreamily, almost as if it were on a pike.

    It was pretty clear then that he really hadn't come to terms with Linux yet, almost as awkard as his famous "Mo-Mo-(slap)-Motif" moment years earlier.
    • Over the years it's become clear to me that McNealy doesn't disagree with Microsoft's monopolist practices. He hates Gates because he wishes Sun was the monopoly, but since it's not he's forced to compete in other ways. If he really believed in open source for its own sake, rather than as a way to pry customers away from Windows, you would've seen Java being open sourced from the beginning, like IBM has done with some of their projects. Instead Sun has tried to use Java to force people into their vision
      • I don't quite agree with that; the biggest problem is the initial cost of the thin clients vs buying a full out PC, loading it with Windows, and dumping on the SUN Ray client application.

        If SUN really wish for people to adopt the SUN Ray in droves, they would have to drop it to *atleast* $100-$150 (the screen AIO models), and drop even further to encourage large enterprise customers to adopt it.

        Either that or with the $100 per employee per year packages, they give a free SUN Ray appliance for each employee
  • by SirTalon42 ( 751509 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @12:56PM (#15205756)
    http://www.sun.com/smi/Press/sunflash/2006-04/sunf lash.20060424.2.xml [sun.com]

    Sun's vision is more relevant today than ever before and is embodied in the product and service breakthroughs it has recently brought to market - from the 'pay-per-view' utility computing Sun Grid and the eco-friendly 32-processor-on-a-chip Coolthreads system, to Sun's innovative software pricing model for the Java Enterprise System and the open sourcing of Java[tm], the Solaris[tm] Operating System and the UltraSPARC T1 chip.


    New definition of 'open source', accidental leak, or does the person not have a clue what they are talking about?
    • New definition of 'open source', accidental leak, or does the person not have a clue what they are talking about?

      None of the above. It was a simple typo, the PR folks missed out the "EE" from "Java EE", it was referring to Glassfish [java.net], and becuase of the confidential nature of the release it did not get the usual proof-reading by geeks. I'e asked for it to be fixed.

  • "Server cannot be found"
  • Slashdotted... (Score:2, Informative)

    by jargoone ( 166102 ) *
    but thankfully, mirrordotted as well:

    http://mirrordot.org/stories/f7bd9bd6bc4fe74eada0d 403e46d594c/index.html [mirrordot.org]
  • by digitaldc ( 879047 ) * on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @01:06PM (#15205849)
    Scott McNealy is a White Dwarf. [wikipedia.org]

    --Why did you say that?

    Because he was totally burnt out at SUN.

    --You cannot B-Sirius!
  • Wait a minute! [slashdot.org]
  • I had the benefit of meeting him at a conference once (within the last few months). When asked what Solaris 10 does that SELinux can't, he said, "What's SELinux?"

    At least he asked.
  • That got bought by Sun awhile ago, I'd hope that he remembers something about innovating. I'd also like to think that he remembers the tech that Sun bought when they bought 'his' company and burried. Probably not too relevant now, but the NeXTStep apps were best of breed at the time, and ran well on 25MHz machines. Perhaps Java could take some direction?
  • by Anonymous Coward
    I am posting this as AC for obvious reasons. At work at Dell at our corporate headquarters. Several months ago, there was a plane circling our buildings all day pulling a banner that was announcing to us that Sun had released new servers. I don't know what it cost to create the banner and then have some guy fly around with it all day, but I'm pretty sure that advertising their product to us was not a good use of capitol. In fact, it felt kind of like a childish "nyah nyah nyah" sort of thing. All in al
  • This totally inevitable thing just happened, something that should have happened a long time ago, but I never fully thought it would actually come to pass... and although it's 100% completely a good thing, I'm oddly sentimental and slightly sad about it, just because it's an end of an era, a shift in the way things always have been. Then, there is that same twinge of excitement and hope for the future.

    Weird.
  • Good Business? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by TheNetAvenger ( 624455 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @02:14PM (#15206421)
    Whether it is Microsoft or even the Devil himself, spending the majority of your speeches and company focus on fighting another company instead of bolstering your own company and strenghtening your own products is a bad business model.

    You don't see Burger King announce a new burger and tell you that it is ok and the best feature it didn't come from McDonalds...

    Maybe if he would have had the same obsession for this company that he did Microsoft, Sun might be stronger on the desktop and not losing server marketshare.
    • You do see a lot of successful religious endeavors spending the bulk of their efforts being against something, homos or drugs or popularly elected south american presidents. I think that they do this because it's easier to get people excited about being unhappy about something than it is to get them excited about being content. and it's hard to sustain being excited about good things without slipping into that contented complacency. That new car buzz never seems to outlast the payments - maybe that's more
      • You do see a lot of successful religious endeavors spending the bulk of their efforts being against something, homos or drugs or popularly elected south american presidents

        True, but none have long term or stable success. People eventually figure things out, even if it takes a while.

  • by QuantGuy ( 654249 ) on Wednesday April 26, 2006 @02:45PM (#15206647)

    McNealy's funniest quote is probably the following one from a 1996 Red Herring article. His letter to the editor is even funnier.

    NORTHWEST PASSAGE: Microsoft's plans to navigate the Java waters. August 1, 1996

    "Microsoft is on the offensive again because its hegemony is threatened by Java's potential to obsolete Windows and Microsoft Office. This is not only financially threatening, but seen as a personal insult. Sun CEO Scott McNealy ceaselessly goads developers to adopt Java and overthrow what he bluntly calls Redmond's mediocre standards of quality--'Windows 95 is just dogshit with whipped cream on top.'"

    LETTER TO THE EDITOR. December 1, 1996

    McNealy euphemizes

    I enjoyed Jonathan Burke's article "Northwest Passage." Mr. Burke did a fine job of laying out the reasons that software developers are pushing for a multiplatform Internet and how this poses a threat to Microsoft.

    However, I was shocked, puzzled, and offended when I came to a passage in the story that seriously misquoted me referring to Windows 95 as "[expletive] with whipped cream on top." As chairman and CEO of Sun Microsystems, a $7 billion publicly held company, I am very aware that my shareholders and the public take a dim view of crude, unprofessional language from executives. I make it a rule never to curse in public. I don't do it. I would never do it. I didn't do it with Mr. Burke or anyone else. In fact, in a carefully worded and deliberately inoffensive manner, I called Win 95 "whipped cream on a road apple."

    Scott G. McNealy
    President and CEO
    Sun Microsystems

    The Herring Responds

    Ah, "a road apple"--that's much more genteel.

  • I dislike Windows and Microsoft and all it stands for intensely, it truly is a third-rate company that makes technologically unsound products. But maybe if McNealy had spent most of his energy trying to focus Sun's products and markering instead of cracking jokes about Microsoft and their products and marketing, maybe Sun would be on top of things.

    In my view, Sun is a very dysfunctional company. They make good servers, yes, but so does the competition (primarily IBM and HP). What is the product strategy, th

    • Possibly although the IT sector is littered with the corpses of superior products. They need to lie through their teeth and produce mediocre products instead, that seems to be the most successful business model in this industry.
  • I guess a comment only modded a lowly "2" [slashdot.org] is worthy of its own /. entry now... oh how our standards have fallen.

    AND YES I AM BITTER.
  • While working as an intern at Sun, heard this one from the man, regarding the merger between HP and Compaq:
    "It's a slow motion collision between two garbage trucks."

    And regarding HP's decision to pull out of some market or other (can't quite remember which one, sadly):
    "All that's left is us, Big Blue, and the Convicts".
  • heaps a load of pressure on incoming CEO Jonathan Schwartz - he will have to get working on his anti-Microsoft gags quick-sharp.

    That's because it worked so well for McNealy, right?
  • McNealy's addiction to H-1b visas cost his stockholders most of their equity [slashdot.org], and its looking increasingly like Gates' addiction will do the same to his stock holders despite Ozzie's efforts to reduce complexity.

    The only thing I wish is that they'd outsource rather than pulling in all those developers, Developers, DEVELOPERS [ntk.net] since once Microsoft implodes under their weight they'll still run around doing to other companies what they've done to HP, Sun and now MS.

    In any case McNealy's comedic impact is no

  • Just check on how DEC and Sun have evolved. There are enough parallels among them.

    1. Both started out with major presence in educational and R&D segments. The early adopters of their systems were in these segments. Both benefited from a large pool of "shared" software that were developed on their systems within these segments.

    2. DEC stuck closely with VMS (earlier RSX-11) even though the "geek" had Unix on VAXes and PDP-11s.
    Sun did the same with Solaris.

    3. Both decided to move to more lucrative banking,

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