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The Internet

.biz Open For Biz 243

Angry Black Man writes: "November 7, 2001 marks a new historic event in domain name suffixes. Neulevel's press release is reporting that the .biz domains went live last night at 12:00." And if you can follow that link, I guess they're live for you too. Anyone going to buy a .biz domain? .info might be used, but .biz just sounds silly/sleazy to me.
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.biz Open For Biz

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  • Sure, .biz sounds sleazy... but so does Neulevel. Clearly sleaze is not a barrier of entry for these people. I'm sure the CRM and spam folks will dig it too.
  • Now the question is...will the existing commercial .com'ers migrate over to .biz? I think it will be some time yet before I try a .biz tld before a .com.
    • Re:Wait and See (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anders ( 395 )

      Now the question is...will the existing commercial .com'ers migrate over to .biz? I think it will be some time yet before I try a .biz tld before a .com.

      Yeah, but when the time comes and .biz gets well-known, you'd better have your company name registered. I think most of the initial registrations will be of the "better safe than sorry" kind than because .biz is thought to be a clever TLD.

      The same goes for other of the new TLDs, of course.

      • Exactly. Even though to my ears .biz sounds incredibly cheap, expect to see www.ibm.biz coming up soon.

        BTW, they seem to answer dns queries for any host, like buyused.pantieshere.biz [pantieshere.biz].

        • Even though to my ears .biz sounds incredibly cheap [...]

          While I generally agree (but also believe it is a matter of what you are used to), show.biz does have some appeal. Are there other obvious combinations?

  • fear.. (Score:4, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:16AM (#2536858)
    scientology.biz!
  • All domains resolve! (Score:5, Informative)

    by DaSyonic ( 238637 ) <DaSyonicNO@SPAMyahoo.com> on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:19AM (#2536866) Homepage
    Lookup ANY .biz domain, even random characters. It resolves, to 209.173.53.173, which the web server there says basically: "Hey, want to buy this domain?"

    Now to me, That is just NOT acceptable, and totally is NOT how DNS for a TLD should be done!
    • by Anonymous Coward
      And they run linux :-) I wonder if netcraft.com is smart enough to realize asdfasd.biz [asdfasd.biz] and dilfbg.biz [dilfbg.biz] are the same site. If not, then this could be an easy way for people to totally screw up the netcraft survey (I guess they'd have to ban any domains resolving to that IP).
    • by PyroMosh ( 287149 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:56AM (#2536939) Homepage
      So what you're saying is

      All your .biz are resolve to 209.173.53.173?

      Okay, sorry, I couldn't resist! (:
      • by Penguin ( 4919 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @05:42AM (#2537024) Homepage
        ... and furthermore, the webserver gives a "200 OK" as a response for a non-existing domain and no expire-date in the HTTP-header. Although no "Last-Modified"-header is supplied and the page might not be at all that cacheable, it is just plain wrong giving such a "correct" answer for a page that shouldn't exist in the first place.

        It seems that the "security", NeuLevel provides, doesn't concern themselves.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      The blurry dead eyes of the folks at the top of the screen scare me...
    • by jankol ( 320191 )
      They aren't alone on this - lookup any .nu domain and it will lead you to 212.181.91.6 / 64.55.105.9 and tell you that "The domain name, .nu, is for sale!".

      That sort of thing is just plain annoying.
    • Since Neulevel will have access to the full list of registered domains, they could use this to suggest close matching domain names when someone makes a typo. Certainly more friendly than a 'DNS Error' message.
    • [~] edwin@k7>telnet blaatblaatblaat.biz smtp
      Trying 209.173.53.173...
      telnet: connect to address 209.173.53.173: Connection refused
      telnet: Unable to connect to remote host


      Oooooh damned damned damned! That would be big spam-fun!

      Edwin
    • A much nicer sollution is used by the Danish: go visit dk [dk] to register a .dk domain.

      I've heard this may fail in msie though.

    • by midom ( 535130 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @08:57AM (#2537276) Homepage
      It will have plenty of negative impact.

      • SMTP sender check is no longer valid.
      • Instead of bouncing 'domain not found' messages smtp servers will have to wait until port 25 responds (argh, tons of mail in queues, tons of bounces later)
      • Scripts checking for existing domain (host) names will have to be redone to check the stupid damn undocumented IP address instead of normal NULL answer in resolver libs... Guys, this isn't only domain registration (more banners for registrars page) thing!
      • Rest in peace John, but the organisation you left isn't listening to your advices and design. Your voice is required here.
      • It is not standards conformant. Internet should be based on standards, because without normal common language we won't be able to talk.

      I am working for ISP in .lt, that also focuses on web hosting and mail solutions and in both spheres I really hate what happens right now. As well as unneeded .biz TLD - maybe it has some urgency in USA where guys forgot they've got local TLD (.us) and even classified ones.

      I hated new.net with their new suffixes, but right now I'm really angry about what official institutions (ICANN) are doing - adding banners to non-existing A records. Pals, this is application implementation, how it should display non-existing pages, not network information backend's.

    • It's nothing new: .nu has been doing it for a while.
    • Yeah I went to microsoft.biz [microsoft.biz] and sure enough there was a banner (with a freaky blurred photo of two people with no eyes, shiver) and an offer to buy. Well, shucks, if microsoft doesn't want it, can I buy it??
  • There's a mirror at lucrativedomain.biz
  • by Nailer ( 69468 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:23AM (#2536876)
    This sucks

    Name a business that's not a commercial entity or a not for profit organization. There aren't any. Hence .biz is a redundant domain and a blatant money making scheme for Neulevel.

    If namespace limits are a concern, then fix the registration policies in the US. In Au, a clever fellow called Robery Elz banned the registration of generic words, and limited the amount of domains a single company could use. This would go some way towards solving the problem.

    So would migrating every .com over to .us or another country code over a five year period. Trademarks are register on a country by country basic and domains should be too.

    Or including multipek fields (Apple (computer) as in computer products, Apple (records) as in music) in a new namespace.

    Oh well. I think .biz will die in the ass anyway, so my little rant doesn't do anything much any.
    • by Anonymous Coward
      In Au, a clever fellow called Robery Elz banned the registration of generic words

      Wouldn't "cyber" be considered a generic word, or is the ban not retroactive?

      (for the confused, look at the parents webpage url)

    • I support Elz, but do you have ANY idea of how F***KED the Australian registry are? They are hell to deal with, and unforunatly Elz just makes it worse, if we had a competent resitrar then Elz's rules would be great. However the Australian government has chosen F**ked resistry over reasnoble rules and forcebly removed Elz's control over the .au
  • Oh Puh-leez (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ajuda ( 124386 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:23AM (#2536877)
    How many domains to we really need? This is sooo obviously a marketing ploy to get everyone to spend more money on domains they don't need. Owners of Ford.com will buy Ford.biz, Dell.com will soon have dell.biz. Are they any better off for .biz? Of course not.

    Sure, some new people will take advantage of .biz domains. But now users have to remember even longer addresses for each website. Let's see, did I want to go to Shopping.com, shopping.org, shopping.net, shopping.biz or shopping.info? Enough already!

    • Re:Oh Puh-leez (Score:5, Insightful)

      by smaughster ( 227985 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:39AM (#2536906)
      >. Let's see, did I want to go to Shopping.com, shopping.org, shopping.net, shopping.biz or shopping.info? Enough already!

      Actually, this is a consequence of earlier mess-ups with domain names. I mean, we are currently "blessed" with domain names which are either regionally focussed (.uk etc.) or fall into a few large categories (.com/.org). In my opinion, regional domain names do not really make sense, since the whole point about internet is its global reach. Furthermore, the most well known domain names (.com, .org) are used as collection bins where everyone with a site wants to fall in. It would make much more sense if the rules for domain name categories were held more strict and if these categories were made more clear.

      I mean, the distinction between .gov and .edu is clear, but .com or .biz? But if we keep holding on to the "few different domain names is good" idea, instead of "quite a few easy but understandle domain names is good" then this problem will remain.
      • Re:Oh Puh-leez (Score:2, Insightful)

        by mgv ( 198488 )
        Regional codes make sense when your business is regional - eg., your local video store, or even the local head office of an international business. Likewise the .gov.au makes alot of sense as compared with .au.gov.

        So, in my opinion, regionalisation makes sense for regional stuff. Which is why you need and have a .us, althogh it is underused.

        I'm hoping that all the dot.com startups that bought out every .com/.net name are running out of money by now and will at least open up the chance everyone getting a more memorable TLD than MyPreferredURLIsAlreadyTaken.com

        Michael
        • Regional codes make sense when your business is regional - eg., your local video store, or even the local head office of an international business.

          This is the vast majority of business anyway.
          • Re:Oh Puh-leez (Score:3, Interesting)

            by Roblimo ( 357 )
            So true.

            The domain I really wanted when I was still active in the limo business was roblimo.md.us because it would have told people where we were (Maryland, USA) at a glance. The old .us domain pattern of including the town and county (roblimo.elkridge.howard.md.us) added too much granularity and was too cumbersome to remember easily, which is why I never got interested in that one.

            For local businesses I believe city.state/province.country or just state/province.country is best both for the business owner and potential customers.

            I have gotten massive spam urging me to get a .biz domain, but I see no point to having one. I can claim copyright infringement against anyone who uses "Roblimo" in other TLDs if I choose, except perhaps against the Robin Miller in Baltimore, County Cork, Ireland who has a small limo service there, and I think he and I would be more likely to put up a "joint" page than argue, since we're certainly not competing with each other. :)

            - Robin
            • The domain I really wanted when I was still active in the limo business was roblimo.md.us because it would have told people where we were (Maryland, USA) at a glance. The old .us domain pattern of including the town and county (roblimo.elkridge.howard.md.us) added too much granularity and was too cumbersome to remember easily, which is why I never got interested in that one.

              The exact format can be rather subjective. Having a city (even part of a city) can be rather important if the business is located in a large conurbation. But potentially misleading in a non urbanised area.
      • Re:Oh Puh-leez (Score:5, Interesting)

        by mpe ( 36238 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @05:35AM (#2537018)
        Actually, this is a consequence of earlier mess-ups with domain names. I mean, we are currently "blessed" with domain names which are either regionally focussed (.uk etc.) or fall into a few large categories (.com/.org)

        Except that .com, .net, .org have in effect been treated as .misc for quite a few years.

        In my opinion, regional domain names do not really make sense, since the whole point about internet is its global reach.

        On the contrary it's non geographic domains which make little sense for a whole set of things. Especially the sale of physical goods, even for non physical goods such as downloadable software or "ebooks" the physical location of the supplier is an important issue both in what currency you use and in the exact contract of sale which is entered into.
        Telephones and "snail mail" also has "global reach", but you don't see demands for everyone to use non geographic telephone numbers and postal addresses (Typically if someone want's a less or even non geographic telephone number or postal address they pay extra for it. Ditto if it has some kind of "vanity content".)
        • The Community Education (adult education, evening classes etc.) bit of my local secondary school (for non-Brits: school for kids aged 11-16) had a .com address - but the area they're useful to extends about 10 miles. They don't even really have a *regional* reach...

          As you say, many US commercial sites (those whose products are something physical rather than information) don't really have much usefulness outside the USA. Anyone remember when bbc.co.uk was the (very much international) British Broadcasting Corporation, but bbc.com was something like Baltimore Business Computers Inc.?
          • As you say, many US commercial sites (those whose products are something physical rather than information) don't really have much usefulness outside the USA.

            There are plenty far more restricted than that, a group of adjacent states, a single state, a city even part of a city.
            Let alone that USA isn't even a single land mass.
      • In my opinion, regional domain names do not really make sense, since the whole point about internet is its global reach.

        Except that current laws are very country-specific, even if the Internet isn't. Trademark law, in particular. can vary in teeny bits from country to country. Having country-specific domain names (where disputes could be governed under the rules of that country) could lead to easier resolution of disputes. (Of course, it doesn't in practice, and we're back to Square 1).

      • I mean, the distinction between .gov and .edu is clear, but .com or .biz?

        It's obvious what the difference is!

        .com is used to target people with X10 popups, while .biz is used to target people with... Oh! Nevermind...

  • by ninewands ( 105734 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:28AM (#2536888)
    As registrar for the new TLD Neulevel will undoubtedly make a TON of money as companies with significantly valuable trademarks rush to protect the value of their IP by registering all possible .your_TLD_here preceded by their trademark.

    Or am I just a cynic?


    • > As registrar for the new TLD Neulevel will undoubtedly make a TON of money as companies with significantly valuable trademarks rush to protect the value of their IP by registering all possible .your_TLD_here preceded by their trademark.

      > Or am I just a cynic?

      Yeah, it sounds like we're missing out on the latest round of internet-as-get-rich-scheme. We should start our own TLD, call it maybe .scam or something, and do a little MAKE MONEY FASTing of our own.
    • No shit ...

      Didnt segfault have a new TLD .con story last week?

    • rush to protect the value of their IP by registering all possible .your_TLD_here preceded by their trademark.

      Why bother? You can wait until someone else buys it, *if* they buy it, then call them cybersqatters etc. and get the domain.
      But probably they'll just rush as you said...
      • I dare you to try. Filing a complaint through ICANN and the WIPO will set you back $2000 in processing fees alone... and thats just to get the WIPO to hear your case; you may not even get the domain back because the squatter can always say he registered it with good intentions.
      • And if you challenge a cybersquatter by having a lawyer even so much as draft the necessary letters, you will incur a legal fees which almost certainly will cover registration fees for the next decade or two at minimum.

  • OK, execs, get ready to pay off another round of squatters.

    How [dum.biz] this going to get?
  • by Pointed Stick ( 304605 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:35AM (#2536899) Homepage
    I can't imagine this being very successful. .com has become synonymous with the entire internet. Heck, internet startup's are even called "dotcoms" more often then not. I'd be willing to make a sizeable bet that the .com on the back of your address is more important then whatever's in front. Think about all the nonsensical names on the internet. Yahoo! springs to mind, and for that matter what does "Amazon" have to do with selling books? What makes those names successful is the fact that they are easy to remember and easy to spell.

    One other thing .biz will have against it from the very start is the fact that there will always be a more marketable .com version for whatever name you can come up with. What we really need, for obvious reasons, is .xxx

    Cheers!

    -Pointed Stick
  • So every XYZ.com is now going to register XYZ.biz as well, making the whole thing pointless ... for example, even NeuLevel [neulevel.biz] have exactly the same website as NeuLevel [neulevel.com].

    Incidentally, who are the 160,000 companies who have already registered? I've tried IBM [ibm.biz], hp [hp.biz], microsoft [microsoft.biz], sony [sony.biz], slashdot [slashdot.biz] - none of them seem to be available ...
  • Oh C'mon! (Score:2, Informative)

    by thesolo ( 131008 )
    November 7, 2001 marks a new historic event in domain name suffixes.

    Why? Did something important happen?? Because .biz is not important at all.

    In all seriousness, this is going to be the biggest top-level domain FLOP ever. All this amounts to is more spam for me to report to Spamcop. People need to realize that no other domain is going to have the same effect as .com on consumers, nor will it be as profitable.
  • They (ICANN ?) actually refused the opening of the .sex level which would have been a good way to just differentiate between pr0n and other websites...
    Now, I guess that sex.biz will be amongst the very first .biz domain names taken...
  • It could be almost anything and nay saying it to death will impose a self-f-blahblah.. Think of it- musicians grab their bands name as a biz, get a tax ID and a bank account.. put up a site for small time distribution. Sell CDs, give away MP3s. If enough bands (replace with alternative underdog in the corp. contractual world) use this method of distribution, it could _possibly_ be one of many small rifts needed to shift the power away from those that lobby for all of these dandy property and censorship laws. Take their money away through new channels, it may adapt into something wonderful. Don't kill the chicken before it's crackin man.

    Pego
  • another verisign... how the hell did neulevel get .us also?
  • by sl8r ( 104278 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:53AM (#2536930)
    Check it out:

    Dear .biz Requester:

    VeriSign understands the personal and professional significance of having a unique online presence. It's our pledge to keep you completely informed about the status of your .biz domain name applications.

    As you may be aware, the Superior Court of Los Angeles, CA, issued a preliminary injunction on October 11th temporarily preventing the activation of certain .biz domain names. Consequently, the .biz Registry, NeuLevel, has "frozen" any domain names where:

    1) Multiple Domain Name Applications (DNAs) were submitted for the same domain name by one individual.

    2) DNAs were submitted for the same domain name by multiple individuals.

    3) One or more Trademark Notification (TN) claims and at least one DNA were submitted for the same domain name.

    For any "frozen" domain names, the registrant has not been selected and NeuLevel has not yet announced when the random selection of registrants will begin. In addition, NeuLevel has not stated how the frozen names will or will not appear in the .biz WHOis database. The .biz domain names you requested that have been "frozen" are listed at the end of this email.

    VeriSign is committed to giving you everything you need for success on the Web. We'll post any updates we receive from NeuLevel at http://newdomains.networksolutions.com. If you have any specific questions or concerns about NeuLevel's domain "freezing" process, please visit www.neulevel.com or e-mail them at support@neulevel.biz


    For those wondering what domain I registered: It's my last name. Isn't it so that family names win over trademarks in a domain name dispute?

    Here's to hoping it is...
  • by ShaunC ( 203807 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @04:54AM (#2536934)
    ...fuckedcompany.com. fucked.biz would be so much easier to type! And so much more appropriate...

    Shaun
  • As all the recent additions to the top level domains have been rather Anglocentric, I wonder if .biz (or any other new TLD) is obscene, vulgar or sex related in other languages on the planet.

    If so, the porn industry there will probably keep the new TLDs commercially viable, cause I don't see a good future for them otherwise.

  • In recent news it was reported that Microsoft will be shifting all their web belongings to the new domain Microsoft.biz, being that thats all they do anyway and would be more appropriate than Microsoft.net.
  • I really don't see the point of having .biz. All the companies that own the thiscompany.com domain will naturally inherit the .biz domain because of the various domain name registration laws.

    The .biz is good for those making money out of domain registration. As for the companies, they would get two domains for the price of two. I expect most companies to simply forward all requests to their .biz to .com.

    At any rate this whole top level domain scheme is fraught with inconstancies. Why is it that everyone except the Americans are happy to use there national TLD ? And most of the .net websites do not belong to service providers or other network related companies. There are very .org sites that can actually be called organisations. We all know about .com.

    As one poster suggested earlier, .sex would probably have been a grand idea. It would have made life a lot easier for the net nannies. Also, they should've made it illegal for any p0rn site to register under any other TLD.

    .info names are going to appear soon. I wonder who is going to use the .info TLD. I would hardly expect it to be by companies in the domain (pardon my pun) of information provision.

    This is just another way for somepeople to make money.

    Then again if you want to use really wicked TLDs you can always use an alternative DNS heirarchy like ORSC [open-rsc.org]

    • This is so true. So many .net are registered by the same company as .com.

      What is really needed is more functional TLDs. I like the idea of the .aero one which is coming along (although whether the aviation industry will survive is another matter). Tuvalu are making a reasonable amount of cash our of selling the .tv domain (like this british TV channel [playuk.tv]).
      There seems to be no point in expanding the range
      of general TLDs because it will just be a race for the big companies to snatch them up again.

      So to go with .aero we should have .auto, .food, .sex, .drugs, .music, .law and some others, reserve them for truly international organisations and put some responsible people in charge of policing them. For everything else, use the national tlds.
  • by asackett ( 161377 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @05:25AM (#2536999) Homepage
    Open Root Server Confederation [open-rsc.org] has been showing the first, original, REAL .biz for a long time now. I will never see any of Neulevel's colliders.

    I Can Abandon ICANN, So Can You. Use the name servers of the Open Root Server Confederation [open-rsc.org].

    • You should also check out OpenNIC [unrated.net] if you're interested in giving ICANN the finger... they're trying to stitch together the (often colliding) namespaces proposed by various alternative-root organizations into a single, sane, democratically-governed namespace. I haven't heard anything from them in a while, though.
  • ...hardly a good basis for "serious" business. I wonder if it will shake off this stigma.
  • I want to have a free domain for my personal use, research or non-profit project. Why not create a .free or .all? Any ideas for a domain like this one?
  • by dimator ( 71399 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @05:58AM (#2537043) Homepage Journal
    I'm waiting for .jiz for all the porn sites I frequent.
  • "The sophistication of business web sites just got dialed up a few hundred notches. .BIZ, the newest domain on the web, utilizes robust technologies that not only make your address for business more secure, but more flexible to your ever-changing needs.

    .BIZ is here. Welcome to your new home.

    THE RIGHT TOOL FOR THE JOB

    Security--.BIZ has it.
    Ever notice that your security guards use German Shepherds instead of Chihuahuas?

    The Right Address--.BIZ has it.
    Why isn't your business headquartered in Timbuktu?

    Technology--.BIZ has it
    Ever notice how your accounting department gave up using the abacus years ago?

    .BIZ--a new name space--a new opportunity. "

    thats straight from neulevel's [neulevel.biz] site. is it just me (or maybe just me at 3am) or is this all nonsence?

    i wonder if neulevel even takes themselves seriously.

    read the "why .biz" section of the site. how can they promise this: "- Secure your peace of mind; your .BIZ name won't be hijacked and changes can't be made to your website without your approval." i'm sure this is what execs want to hear, but i think that even they can see that the TLD has nothing to do with how secure their web servers are.

    ".BIZ is the first and only global top-level domain (gTLD) 'built for business.'" havn't they ever heard of .com

    this whole thing just makes me sick. sort of like the first time i saw those "sponsored links" filling up the first screenfull of my altavista searches.

    .biz -- they can keep it. i'm just waiting for the next big revolution, maybe i'll be one of the ones who remembered when it all began (coarse hashing out VM things 50 years from now'll probubly be fun:) AC was right dammit!)

    time to go back to the cave, and try to get some sleep before chem tomarrow.

    -Caleb Moore
  • by MosesJones ( 55544 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @06:51AM (#2537109) Homepage

    Yes thats right, aiming at the secret services and terrorist organisations around the world, the TLD for them its...

    .end

    Yes the new "Emperors new Domain" domain has all of the advantages of traditional domain names and so much less.

    No DNS... yes thats right register your .end and noone will be able to find the site. This provides the secrecy required by todays spy and terrorist rings.

    No connection, yes this is the TLD for those organisations that don't connect to the internet. Got a closed loop controlling your nuclear deterent ? No worries now you can hang out with those cool (but sadly unemployed) .com guys with you head held high with your .end address, safe in the knowledge that your so cool because they can't find it.

    "I love the fact that I can't be found" - Mr Bin Ladle

    "Not interested, we like our systems easy to hack" - Mr Cyril Ian Arthur

    "My business was a total flop, it really is impossibly to find" - Mr Peter Orn head of sex.end
  • by Quazion ( 237706 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @07:00AM (#2537119) Homepage
    Lets say all SPAM from non .biz domains is illegal and its legal from the .biz domain, meaning i would only need to filter .biz mail out.

    When does life get so simpel ?

    Quazion
  • The root of the problem is the idea that one level of hierarchization is enough to solve everything down to the institution level. It's the same problem as unix, were you have about 10,000 files in /bin /usr/bin and other choice locales in the namespace.

    I guess people just have trouble thinking in two dimensions. But honest, people, its easier...
    What I'd like to see is at least a two level hierarchy, so you have institutions organized in to logical groups:
    www.ford.cars
    www.gm.cars
    www.dell.comp
    www.gateway.comp
    www.yahoo.portal
    www.go.portal
    www.google.search
    www.lycos.search
    etc. Makes a lot more sense to me, but the trouble is you have a lot more administrative overhead. It also solves the multiple companies with the same name problem.

    DH
    • Nice idea, but you'd forcibly have to remove .com (and maybe even .org) to make it work equitably, other wise apple.comp and apple.music would still fight over apple.com. So, ideas for where we find the money to compensate businesses who have just re-painted their fleet of trucks and paid for a advertising campaign based on their .com name?

  • biz is the same, phonetically speaking, as "bise" meaning kiss.
  • by wowbagger ( 69688 ) on Thursday November 08, 2001 @09:18AM (#2537311) Homepage Journal
    How about the following for TLD's:

    .© - for example, riaa.©, mpaa.©
    .® - for all the corporations to have product domains (kleenex.®, q-tip.®)
    .$ - for all the make-money-quick spammers (they seem to be largly US, but if needed, we can localize them with .£ et. al. )

    Come on fellow /.'s, let's pool our money and set this up!
  • I've always divided businesses into two categories: Those who promote their products, and those who promote their name.

    Those that promote their product usually have a product worth promoting, support it well and place the value of the business on that product and support.

    Those that promote their name are usually the kind that are just out to get money anyway they can, including all of the practices that we've all grown to know and hate here on Slashdot; strong IP manipulation, questionable anti-competative practices and legislative and judicial buyouts.

    .BIZ sounds like the kind of name the second type of business would like.

  • Show.BIZ Troubles (Score:2, Interesting)

    by SL33Z3 ( 104748 )
    A while ago, I had thought up a domain called "show.com" for a reason I'm not quite ready to release just yet. It was obviously taken. When register.com said I could pre-register show.biz, I was happy as hell. I registered it not even thinking about the fact that I would now own a very popular and much wanted domain for entertainment purposes (showbiz!) It would even appear that there is a copyright on the name "show.biz" for the purposes of entertainment. I have no intentions of using this for entertainment purposes at all, but I already have about 6 Intellectual Property claims against me for the domain. I imagine if I am actually awarded the domain when it is all said and done, I will have lawsuits to contend with.

    Anyone got some advice?

    Thanks.

    Tobin
    • Bring money, guns and lawyers.

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  • Is it just me, or is the commercial greed machine putting the cart before the horse, here? DNS was never meant to support a plethora of TLDs. The push for 20, 30.. or 300 new TLDs will require a directory service (which I'm sure M$ will be MORE than happy to provide).

    Don't you think we should hold off on creating new TLDs until AFTER we've created an Internet Directory System (or something) to replace DNS?

    And I should also mention that if you are looking for someone's web site, you really only have a few choices today. What is National Semiconductor's main web site URL? Anyone care to guess? How many guesses will it take if we have 30 more TLDs?

    Needless to say, I really think adding TLDs is not a good idea for DNS.

    Vortran out
  • Neulevel.biz has actually resolved for a few months now. Today, all the other .biz domains went live..
  • .inc, .llc, .ltd, .gmbh (if they allow more than three bytes), .sa, and so on?

    And maybe .npo for non-profit organizations.
    • inc, .llc, .ltd, .gmbh (if they allow more than three bytes), .sa, and so on?

      Because your average punter knows a brand by their common name, eg Walmart or Ford, and doesn't necessarily know whether the company is a PLC or LTD.

      .us makes sense. Why is the USA, the most prominent country on the net, the only one not to have a country tld? (rhetorical question) I'd plump for .art for artists (music, painters, etc), and .mag for magazines or news sources.

      And maybe .npo for non-profit organizations.

      .org already covers this category.

      Phillip.

  • I predict that soon all of the failing dot-coms that are still alive will convert their business names to .biz. Heck, we may even get some of the old .coms resurrected as .bizes.

    We can go through the entire cycle all over again. The Industry Standard will.. oh, wait.. uhh.. "Smart Company" will tout the virtues of new and innovative .biz companies. Headlines on Forbes will scream: "Making Sense of the Dot-Biz Boom," while the Economist will caution against investment bubbles.

    The fearless among us will leave our cushy, well-paid jobs at established companies (wait, there aren't many cushy jobs left, are there?), to try our luck on the merry-go-wheel of the Dot-Biz economy.

    After a while, Microsoft will gobble up the first few big Dot-Biz companies. The rest will go through all their funding with no profits to show for it. Most will tank. Angry investors will file lawsuits, alleging that they were misled by exorbitant claims of dot.biz companies.

    A few survivors will limp along, and a few will survive. Eventually, someone will come up with the idea of a new top-level domain...

    .hyp, anyone?

  • With all the spam I've received on it, I wouldn't touch it with a ten foot pole. I hope that no one will buy this sucker due to the crap these loons are trying to pull.
  • I keep mistyping .BIZ as .BIX. Can we get NeuLevel to mirror .biz into .bix for the fumble-fingers crowd? It would sure help allieve a lot of confusion.
  • But mainly because I've got a squajillion spams sitting in my spamtrap telling me I *could* buy one.

    Makes the whole TLD smell bad to me already. And no, I haven't checked to see if the spams are coming from anybody with a legitimate business related to the rollout. It's just an irrational gut feeling; I now associate .biz with "Shy About You're Pacakge?" Feh.

Money is the root of all evil, and man needs roots.

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