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Comment Re:Simple solution (Score 1) 126

Slashdot is often associated, whether rightly or wrongly, with being populated by many tech related users, it's within the realm of possibility of rogue scripts being served with Slashdot to scarf up clipboard data, passwords, etc in hopes of hacking well known websites that Slashdot users do work for.

No doubt. If the "good guys" target Slashdot users, you can bet the black hats do, as well.

Comment Re: Not surprise in the least... (Score 4, Informative) 457

That is nonsense. The IT guy that wiped her server, after the investigation began, posted on this very site asking for advice on how to destroy the evidence.

He posted on Reddit, not here, and his inquiry didn't read to me like an attempt to destroy evidence. He was trying to figure out how to redact email addresses from a large corpus of archived messages. This is standard practice during electronic discovery and document production, and isn't a sign of anything nefarious.

Jeb Bush performed the same scrubs on his email archives, after first releasing them unredacted and causing an uproar because they were full of constituents' personal data.

Submission + - Cloudflare Leaks Sensitive User Data Across the Web

ShaunC writes: In a bug that's been christened "Cloudbleed," Cloudflare disclosed today that some of their products accidentally exposed private user information from a number of websites. Similar to 2014's Heartbleed, Cloudflare's problem involved a buffer overrun that allowed uninitialized memory contents to leak into normal web traffic. Tavis Ormandy, of Google's Project Zero, discovered the flaw last week. Affected sites include Uber, Fitbit, and OKCupid, as well as unnamed services for hotel booking and password management. Cloudflare says the bug has been fixed, and Google has purged affected pages from its search index and cache.

Comment Re:preposterous! (Score 1) 264

Low on the list, but certainly not nonzero. Given the increasing number of devices out there it's probably happening around the world with some regularity. There just isn't a way for most of us to properly measure or attribute the occurrences.

Say you're driving down the interstate and your cruise control shuts off, but you're sure you didn't bump the brake. Your $1.49 bag of chips rings up as $9.49 at the grocery store, but re-scans at the correct price after a void. A few pixels go blurry in an otherwise flawless TV broadcast. We tend to chalk these things up as "a glitch" and go on with life, but a few of them really are caused by tiny visitors from outer space...

Comment Re:Google News mobile (Score 1) 56

My problem with AMP is that Google returns tons of those results for normal searches as well. It's supposed to be Accelerated Mobile Pages, but I'm not on mobile, I'm on a desktop. I don't want to see stripped-down AMP results, I want to go to the original page.

Submission + - TV News Broadcast Accidentally Activates Alexa, Initiates Orders (cw6sandiego.com)

ShaunC writes: Amazon's Echo digital assistant is supposed to make our lives easier, but one recent incident is causing headaches for some Echo owners. In San Diego, TV news anchor Jim Patton was covering a separate story about a child who accidentally ordered a doll house using her family's Echo. Commenting on the story, Patton said "I love the little girl, saying 'Alexa ordered me a dollhouse.'" Viewers across San Diego reported that in response to the news anchor's spoken words, their own Echo devices activated and tried to order doll houses from Amazon. Amazon says that anyone whose Echo inadvertently ordered a physical item can return it at no charge.

Comment Re:Remember this when they decide fake news... (Score 1) 159

There's 100% chance that their "junk detection algorithm" tagged this as something that would offend uptight pricks in the suburbs. Those kind of people will insist on junk being covered on renaissance masterpieces.

Reminds me of the guy who lost an election to a dead man, but was still appointed Attorney General. Let the Eagle Soar! Just don't let any nipples show.

Comment Re:A better question is why (Score 1) 258

What's not to like?

Digital books and e-readers, that's what. I want a book I can hold, feel, smell, turn the pages. A book doesn't need to be charged, it doesn't come encumbered by DRM, there's no glare reflecting back off its pages. And my eyes are compatible with every book, I don't need to worry about what format it's in and whether or not it works with my specific pair of ocular devices.

Comment Put your money where your mouth is (Score 1) 162

After more than two years of public implementation and internal study, Google security architects have declared Security Keys their preferred form of two-factor authentication.

OK Google, then offer to ship these dongles out to your users at no cost. I'm not going to buy yet another little thing that's going to break, or get lost, or get stolen; I'll use it if it's free, though. I like PayPal's approach, they mailed out free SecurID dongles to anyone with a business account who asked for one. Mine still works fine on the original battery 10 years later.

Submission + - Self-Driving Uber Car Runs Red Light in San Francisco (theverge.com)

ShaunC writes: Hours after making their debut in San Francisco, one of Uber's self-driving cars has been caught on camera running a red light while a pedestrian was in the crosswalk. The source video shows that the traffic signal was red for several seconds before the car proceeded through the crossing. A human driver is required to be in each self-driving car, ostensibly to seize control in situations the AI can't handle. In this case, it appears both the car and its attendant failed.

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