Become a fan of Slashdot on Facebook

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
AI Businesses

AI Tailors Can Wait (bloomberg.com) 71

Bloomberg Businessweek: Original Stitch has all the trappings of an e-commerce success story. The pitch is simple: Original Stitch uses computer-vision software to review photos of your most beloved dress shirts uploaded to the company website, then delivers perfectly tailored copies. We tried it -- the only problem was that it didn't work. When the first shirt arrived too tight around the chest and too long in the sleeves, we figured an editor's sloppy photography was to blame, but the problems persisted with a second attempt. A third shirt, ordered under a different name to make sure we wouldn't get special treatment, could barely be buttoned up. The sleeves felt like tourniquets. "We tried to push the envelope," Original Stitch founder Jin Koh acknowledged after we confronted him with the results. "Obviously, it's still in beta." In December, three months after launching the service, Koh quietly pulled it down. He's returned to asking users to fill out a questionnaire with their own measurements while he works out the bugs.
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

AI Tailors Can Wait

Comments Filter:
  • by ranton ( 36917 ) on Tuesday February 06, 2018 @01:51PM (#56077593)

    Why test your product at all if customers can just do it for you?

    1. Release product under name #1
    2. Get a lot of test data from thousands of soon to be disgruntled customers
    3. Close up shop
    4. Release product under name #2
    5. Profit

  • by CastrTroy ( 595695 ) on Tuesday February 06, 2018 @01:52PM (#56077597) Homepage

    I say we name this AI, Denise [pinimg.com].

    Sure the AI has some flaws now, but it will eventually get better. Also, a lot of the problems are going to come from the quality of the picture. The lens usually distorts the image. I remember doing an AI project one and we had to account for the fish-eye effect of the lens. Also, our adjustments only worked for our camera and would have been broken for another camera.

    • I'd say Keystone Effect will have a bigger influence on distorted garments than any lens distortions.

      If you take a look at the Bodygram [originalstitch.com] page at Original Stitch the example photos are taken from directly above the shirt.

      The first picture in TFA demonstrates the Keystone Effect well - instead of the camera being directly above the shirt when the picture was taken it was off-center by a couple of feet and taken from below. This resulted in the top of the shirt appearing about 70-80% of the width of the bottom

    • by mjwx ( 966435 )

      Sure the AI has some flaws now, but it will eventually get better. Also, a lot of the problems are going to come from the quality of the picture. The lens usually distorts the image. I remember doing an AI project one and we had to account for the fish-eye effect of the lens. Also, our adjustments only worked for our camera and would have been broken for another camera.

      That's the least of their worries, even if the system worked perfectly human tailors have little to worry about. The reason you go to a tailor these days is for the service. A proper tailor will do 2 or 3 fittings at a minimum as nothing ever comes out perfect. A made to measure tailor let alone a completely bespoke one will have you try the clothing on to determine if it needs adjustment to your body shape and it usually does.

      The AI tailor will be competing with off the rack stores for business.

  • Even if it worked, it isn't AI. Vision and voice recognition are not AI.
  • and the AI delivered Cirque Du Soleil's tent. I think it works.

  • AI change everything.
  • by Hylandr ( 813770 ) on Tuesday February 06, 2018 @02:22PM (#56077803)

    "We tried to push the envelope, ... Obviously, it's still in beta."

    This needs to be printed on a t-shirt. I would wear it everywhere.

  • It sounds like it's the data-gathering mechanism that is insufficient to the task, not that "AI tailors" are to blame.

    It's pretty flipping hard for anyone to take a picture (much less something sloppily done) and make a wearable, nicely-fitted garment from it. There's some pretty complex 3d geometry going on.

    • by HiThere ( 15173 )

      Yes, you'd need at least two photos taken at right angles to give a good image, and that probably wouldn't suffice.

      OTOH, a post above claimed that camera lenses systematically distort things sufficiently that that wouldn't even come close. The the processing needs to be tailored to fit the camera that took the photo. Whee! That sounds like it could be fixed by taking the photos standing against a grid. This is getting more and more complex. Now how do the customers get the standard grid, and how do you

  • by Anonymous Coward

    The obvious thing here is that they are trying to copy an existing thing, not by taking a picture of the wearer, but by taking a picture of the item. Take a look at all the chinese counterfeit websites (here's one: gamiss.com ) generally any website that is 85% off and looks like a generic shop with a label applied and uses the same photos you see on eBay are selling counterfeits (anything "new without tags" is counterfeit.) Now take a look at the reviews for these sites, you will see the same thing

    "Ill fit

  • by xxxJonBoyxxx ( 565205 ) on Tuesday February 06, 2018 @03:19PM (#56078167)
    I will buy from an online tailor named Garek. That is all.
    • by pr0t0 ( 216378 )

      I would only buy from an online tailor called Pendel and Braithwaite. "Tailor of Panama" reference. Great movie.

    • by mjwx ( 966435 )

      I will buy from an online tailor named Garek. That is all.

      Is he off Keeping up with the Kardaisans?

  • Just imagine if, instead of an AI tailor, you had to do with an AI surgeon...
  • Is "most beloved dress shirts" something normal people actually have? Sounds absolutely ridiculous. Using computer vision to determine measurements would be great, but you don't need to clone an existing shirt. That's just silly. Are these even going to be cheaper if they're custom manufactured for each user?

  • So instead of taking actual measurements, that require only maybe 5 minutes of effort, your try to do a shirt off of a photograph only? How is that a good idea, or even reasonably chanced at success? People come in all different shapes and sizes, and I fully expect to have 100% high quality custom tailored clothing within the next 10 years courtesy of robotics and AI, why make it harder and less likely to succeed than it has to be? Nail down quick and efficient custom shirt AI fabrication and have kiosks

"Never face facts; if you do, you'll never get up in the morning." -- Marlo Thomas

Working...