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Buy Low, Spam High 159

An anonymous reader writes "A recent study on spam has revealed that spammers see a return between 4.9% and 6% when selling stocks they have bought low and spammed the world with." From the article: "The researchers say that approximately 730 million spam e-mails are sent every week, 15% of which tout stocks. Other estimates of spam volumes are far higher. The study, by Professor Laura Frieder of Purdue University in the US and Professor Jonathan Zittrain from Oxford University's Internet Institute in the UK, analysed more than 75,000 unsolicited e-mails. All of the messages touting stocks and shares were sent between January 2004 and July 2005."
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Buy Low, Spam High

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  • More spam then! (Score:2, Insightful)

    by Cybert4 ( 994278 ) *
    Well at least these email won't get me in trouble at work, unlike some of the nastier ones.

    But it's scary that people are actually following any information in this spams. Unlike Nigerian scams, this at least has a hint of legitimacy, which will mean the spam floodgates will open even further.

    I notice the department is "anything-for-a-buck". That will change after the singularity. I see money as being a non-issue then.
    • Re:More spam then! (Score:5, Interesting)

      by russ1337 ( 938915 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @03:03PM (#15981103)
      At first I thought "who are these stupid people buying stock from spammed tips?", but then I figured as long as you are one of the first to buy - you will gain almost as much on the stock as the spammer, without having spammed anyone.

      I guess the trick is to get onto a spam list that has the largest effect on the market (the widest distribution?), and get in early (perhaps many many e-mail addresses?) and try to be at the start of the spam list (perhaps addresses aaaaaaa@mail.com, zzzzzzz@mail.com etc).

      As long as you get in early on stock being manipulated, and your not the one doing the spamming, your less guilty than the spammer and there is a slightly better chance you'll get away with it....
      • Re:More spam then! (Score:4, Informative)

        by pete6677 ( 681676 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @03:53PM (#15981576)
        You'd probably be better off shorting these stocks a few days after the spam is sent, since the price will certainly fall. That being said, shorting is very risky and should only be done by experienced investors. But if a stock price is being hyped by spam, you know it will be falling soon.
        • Actually, I looked through some examples, and it seems the stock price usually drops of significantly VERY quickly (within the day). Shorting might work there, if your broker allows it! Of course, if the price shoots up, you'll be screwed...
      • by billstewart ( 78916 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @05:37PM (#15982358) Journal
        Sure, there are people who actually believe the H0t St0xx T1pZ they receive in their email, because if the saw it on the internet it must be true, but (while remembering Mencken's advice) I'd hope that they're not the majority of people who buy the stock.

        People like you who *know* it's a scam and are trying to get ahead of the other suckers are an even better market - as with the Nigerian-corrupt-official scams, you not only get duped, but you're in no position to bitch about it :-) It's basically like trying to be in the early phases of a Ponzi or pyramid scam.

        Unlike the other scams, it is possible to make money on this by selling short, but if the scammer's only making 4-6% on the deal, it's pretty risky, and it may be hard to get brokers willing to do short sales on worthless penny stocks without paying enough in commissions to eat up your loss. On the other hand, it should certainly be easy to collect data on this kind of thing, because if you're like me, you get a couple of new stock scam offers a day, and you could track the prices after you get them.

      • Well you'd think that would be how it worked but the evidence [spamstocktracker.com] suggests otherwise.
      • Maybe that's the same thing all the other suckers are thinking when they buy spam promoted stocks.
        • Maybe that's the same thing all the other suckers are thinking when they buy spam promoted stocks.
          Exactly, But I'm saying that you need to get spammed first and act faster than everybody else. People later in this topic say they have bought stock from spam tips and it did ok 'cos the sheep' were following.... i'm saying you just need to be the first sheep.
  • Wow (Score:2, Insightful)

    So they get about the same return as relatively safe investments and all it takes is a whole bunch of extra work and risk.
    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

      by nosredna ( 672587 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:29PM (#15980784)
      Not exactly. They're getting a 4-6% gain the next day, not annually. Fire them off once a week, and you're talking several thousand percent gain annually.
      • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

        by Kjella ( 173770 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:52PM (#15980997) Homepage
        Not exactly. They're getting a 4-6% gain the next day, not annually. Fire them off once a week, and you're talking several thousand percent gain annually.

        Quote TFA: The team found that a spammer who bought shares the day before starting an e-mail campaign and then sold them the day after could make a return on his or her investment of 4.9%.

        Now the stock market is open ~250 days/year. 1,04^250 = 18127,37 = 1812737%. Not just thousands, millions. Now that's a decent ROI for any "company".
        • Not quite (Score:2, Insightful)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Not quite true either. Assuming these people pay taxes that will be a huge hit on their returns. For instance a US investor would get slapped with significant short term capital gains which can be in the neighborhood of 30-40+% depending on what state you live in, etc. Plus there are stock transaction fees on top of this moving in and out of the stock. Finally, there is a significant chance that the SEC may see this activity and be able to trace your recent purchase/sale and find you. Most of these stocks t
    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Golias ( 176380 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:29PM (#15980788)
      It's still an attempt at market manipulation, and the SEC should come down on anybody who does this like the fist of an angry god. CEOs have gone to prison over this, you would think they could at least bitchslap these spam-and-dump traders with a hefty fine.
      • Re:Wow (Score:4, Informative)

        by B11 ( 894359 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:35PM (#15980843)
        actually they do sometimes catch [itweek.co.uk] them.
      • Every once in a while a batch of stock spams comes in and I forward a bunch of them in a message to enforcement [at] sec.gov

        I don't know if they actually do anything with the data -- within an hour I get an automatic response thanking me for the report and telling me that their investigations are confidential, and that's it.
      • It's still an attempt at market manipulation, and the SEC should come down on anybody who does this like the fist of an angry god.

        As soon as most investors find out about this scam, it will become legal almost overnight. Remember futures? Used to be regarded as decidedly dodgy. Nowadays they're a mainstream market force. Say hello to the new future(s); Spam!
    • So they get about the same return as relatively safe investments and all it takes is a whole bunch of extra work and risk.

      I think the article means 4.9% to 6% per scam, meaning they make that in about two days, not over the course of one year. 4.9%, compounded once every two days for one year comes out to over 500,000%
    • So they get about the same return as relatively safe investments and all it takes is a whole bunch of extra work and risk.
      RTFA. That's not an annual rate of return, thats a one to two day rate of return. 4.9% was the average 1-day rate, I don't care to do the math right now, but over the course of a year (holidays and weekends excluded), that compounds to a gajillion percent.
    • Re:Wow (Score:5, Insightful)

      by tnk1 ( 899206 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:35PM (#15980844)
      There is a certain group of people who are constitutionally unable to do something as mainstream as say, investing in solid funds to make their money. They need to feel like they are "getting the better" of others.

      Spammers are usually certified losers, and few really ever actually make anything of themselves, and if they do make any money, they manage to lose it somehow by themselves, or AOL starts digging in their backyards for it.

      These people you could almost feel sorry for if they weren't clogging your mail box, stealing bandwidth, trying to sell bad deals to the unwary, and underwriting organized crime by paying for use of their botnets.

      On second thought... maybe I don't feel sorry for them at all.

    • by jhfry ( 829244 )
      I could be wrong, but I think they mean that make between 4% and 6% per stock. Therefore if they do this 100 times per year they make a pretty hefty chunk after compounding.

      For example a $1000 start would pay out $131,501.26 like this over 100 iterations if they keep reinvesting the funds on their next spam crusade (using 5% return per iteration).

      So this is not 4%-6% per year... it's 4%-6% per stock... considering they are only invested for a day or two it's entirely possible that they actually bring home
      • For example a $1000 start would pay out $131,501.26 like this over 100 iterations if they keep reinvesting the funds on their next spam crusade (using 5% return per iteration).
        But do those stocks trade at a high enough volume to enable you to fully reinvest that way? Would it be possible to buy over $100,000 worth of, say, a .05 stock in one day? Not saying the scam wouldn't work; just wondering how far it would "scale."
    • A return of 4.9% *over a few days* is damn lucrative, you could do a couple of buy-spam-sell cycle per month.
  • -1 Duh (Score:3, Insightful)

    by SanityInAnarchy ( 655584 ) <ninja@slaphack.com> on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:26PM (#15980760) Journal
    I actually get more like 50% stock stuff. It simply amazes me that no one's caught these fuckers. I mean, the money has to go somewhere, right?
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by fm6 ( 162816 )
      So how do you prove that somebody who made a 5% profit turning around a penny stock is the same guy who sent out the "we have a runner!" spam?
      • by hkmwbz ( 531650 )
        Maybe he does it several times, and you'll see the same pattern every time. The same guy buys stock, spam is sent, stock goes up, he sells.
    • by jfengel ( 409917 )
      Identifying pump-and-dump stocks is easy: you just look at the spam. It shouldn't be too hard from there to narrow down the list of suspects: people who bought just before a surge and sold during it. But if the stock is heavily trafficked, the spammers may hope to hide among the crowd.

      And connecting those people to the spam, however, may be tricky. Raid their houses, look on their computers, and hope you find something incriminating.

      There are ways to launder that money. If they're using accounts opened wit
    • by Amouth ( 879122 )
      I am wondering about the 75,000 spam mails.. i personaly filter for 3 domains and it totals on average 1 a sec which is 80-90,000 a day.. i am sorry but if your going to say what is with use a true sample for the base.. as for the % that is stock stuff i have no clue.. and dev null doesn't see to answer me when i ask
      • I am wondering about the 75,000 spam mails.. i personaly filter for 3 domains and it totals on average 1 a sec which is 80-90,000 a day.. i am sorry but if your going to say what is with use a true sample for the base..

        If your issue is the timeframe, then the article says that the spam was sent over a 1.5 year period. Seems ok.

        If your problem is with the size of the sample, then that isn't the issue. A sample size of that size is far more than enough, if the sample is random. Now, according to the art
        • by Amouth ( 879122 )
          i agree .. if it was a random sample..

          i am not arguing it for the fact that spamers make money..

          i just don't think that based on that sample size that he can say x% is stock market spam
  • So... you mean that if I pick a stock from one of these scam emails, and see if there's been a recent rise in price, I can net a few percent off it if I pick it up and hold it for a period of time?

    Eh, if I felt like gambling I'd go to the casino.
    • by TigerTime ( 626140 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:31PM (#15980802)
      After watching these a few times, I actually tried buying one of the stocks. The best chance is if you look at the stock and it hasn't risen any yet (meaning you get the email before everyone else).

      I bought about $100 of a $.20 stock and wound up selling it for $.55. I've stayed away from them though usually as I seem to only look at them after the price is moving.
      • by alexhmit01 ( 104757 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:38PM (#15980881)
        One morning I got my email right after the market openned, saw no movement... on a whim, bought a few hundred bucks worth, figuring, people stupider than me had to fall for it... Made about 20%-30% on the deal after commissions...

        Haven't tried in a few years, been to busy, but it was actually pretty funny... Thought about doing that with some small money... I mean, the annual percentage gain is really impressive if you actually acted on all these and got some fast run ups...

        The problem is, it's all short term, which means major taxes... Alternatively, you could do it in an IRA or other shielded account, but that means keeping in cash except when you make the play... no margin means you need to keep cash sitting around when you aren't playing, which cuts into returns... If you have margin, you can always move the cash in 2-3 days later conveniently.

        Alex
        • So you expect us to believe that you made a ridicuolous profit on this one deal and you just walked away without trying it again? Because you've "been to busy"? Or could it be that you're one of these stock spammers, only you've found a more efficient method of spreading your ads? Slashdot: Ads for Nerds. Spam that Matters.

          Or maybe I'm a little grumpy. Either way, your story doesn't add up.
    • by Daverd ( 641119 )
      And if the price has risen recently, sell it short. It's gonna go back down to its true value eventually (probably after the spammers sell their shares).
      • And if the price has risen recently, sell it short. It's gonna go back down to its true value eventually (probably after the spammers sell their shares).

        I actually looked into this earlier this year... figuring that the only *safe* bet in this world is to bet on most Americans being stupid.

        As I got each stock-pump spam, I'd record the ticker symbol and the date I first saw a spam for it. Then, I'd look at the stock's price after 1 week, 2 week, 4, 8, 12, and 16 weeks out. I was surprised at how cons

  • by eln ( 21727 ) * on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:30PM (#15980798) Homepage
    The stocks they pick are always crap. Unlike XFGW, that sucker is ready to POP! I'm talking 30,000% return in just a few months! Yah, baby!

    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      by B11 ( 894359 )
      I'd invest in XFGW, but I have my money tied up in helping a former government minister in Nigeria get his millions out of a bank.
    • XFGW refinances mortgages and makes penis enlargement pills and V1agra doesn't it?
    • Hey, XFGW doesn't exist!

      Oh, wait a second... should I congratulate you for not taking advantage of the slashdot crowd or become worried with the fact that I actually bothered to look for XFGW?
      • by eln ( 21727 ) *
        I actually looked it up before I used it just to make sure it didn't actually exist. While the thought of some moron actually losing his shirt on a stock tip intended purely as a joke is pretty humorous, I don't think my (real life) karma could take the hit.
  • That's 6% in 2 days (Score:5, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:34PM (#15980838)
    Folks, that's 6% in 2 days, not 1 year. That's about 33,000% anually.
  • by amichalo ( 132545 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:36PM (#15980856)
    I wonder if it is against NASDQ/NYSE/etc exchange rules for a company to knowingly engage or have a 3rd party engage in unsolicited spam to promote the stock.

    If it is NOT, then I think it should be. I could see how a spammer who is long or short on a stock could do this without the company knowing, but if it could be proven, perhaps it would be analogous to issuing a public statement by the company.

    Thoughts?
    • I was thinking the same thing. I remember an 18 year old kid being put on trial after he scammed over a million dollars by hyping his stocks in internet chatrooms and on yahoo. Sadly his parents supported him and told him how proud they were.

      If your broke this certainly does have an appeal.

      If its not illegal it better well should be. Imagine if all the financial institutions in the world began doing this? if its legal then why not? They would make so much money.
      • By making this activity illegal, you validate people who go on message boards and tout a particular stock. Due to the fact that it is illegal to "pump and dump", people then are more likely to believe stuff they read on a message board. On the other hand, if it were legal, and everyone knew that, then people would be less likely to believe some crap about a stock on a message board. So, while there might be more people doing it, by making it illegal you have empowered those who are willing to break the l
        • So by your logic methamphetamine should be 100% legal since people will see how bad it is and not use it. But people can do that now and they still use it, right? So how will making illegal stock activity legal convince people not to join in? If people don't know enough not to believe crapola on a message board now how is making it legal going to change things? Also, how is making something illegal "validating" those who choose to break the law? If I see someone trying to sell me stolen goods it doesn'
          • Look at it like this, if slander were not illegal, it would be harder to effectively slander a person. Because it is illegal, people generally have a tendency to believe what they hear more, since it is less likely that a person is simply slandering another person.

            If it was widely known that slander was legal, then anytime a person said something negative about another person, listeners would have a tendency to scrutinize the thing being said, since it is possibly slander. As it currently is, a stateme
    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      by Marauder2 ( 82448 )
      "I wonder if it is against NASDQ/NYSE/etc exchange rules for a company to knowingly engage or have a 3rd party engage in unsolicited spam to promote the stock."

      It is against SEC regulation (read Federal LAW). It's called "Pump and Dump" or "Microcap fruad"

      http://www.sec.gov/answers/pumpdump.htm [sec.gov]
      http://www.sec.gov/investor/pubs/cyberfraud.htm [sec.gov]
      • While it is indeed against SEC regulations. Those regulations do not fall under the category of Federal Law. They are just a bunch of beauratic rules for doing business in the American stock market. Federal Law is voted on by elected representatives of government.
    • This is a scam called "Pump and Dump" and it is not new by any means. Although email has given it a new twist and made it easier, it's been going on as long as people have been trading things. In the US, it is highly illegal, and prosecuted mercilessly by the SEC if they can catch the person doing it. It's one of the main reasons the SEC was created in the first place. Basically, if you purchase a stock for any other reason than "Gee, this looks like a solid company with a good product" then it is illegal.
      • by SLi ( 132609 )
        Though I don't know what the usual sentences for these cases are, I found a story of a lawyer (in the US) that did pump and dump sentenced to 8 years in prison. However that apparently also included tax fraud related to the pump and dump scheme.
        • by Peyna ( 14792 )
          However that apparently also included tax fraud related to the pump and dump scheme.

          People who obtain their money illegally, seldom report it on their taxes.

          How do you think we catch a lot of drug dealers? They make millions, buy fancy houses and cars, and pay nothing in taxes.
      • Basically, if you purchase a stock for any other reason than "Gee, this looks like a solid company with a good product" then it is illegal.

        Unless your reason is "Gee, with this stock I'll gain controlling interest, then I can take it off the market, fire its workforce, borrow lots of money, liquidate its assets, pay myself a large 'finders fee', and sell the carcass."

        That's perfectly legal.
  • by ScentCone ( 795499 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:40PM (#15980891)
    It's set to explode!

    Will it be a big mover?

    Don't let the inside investors beat you to it!

    Ugh. It simply astonished me that language like that, which is repeated over and over again, verbatim, moves enough people to bid up stocks to the point that someone can actually see gains that matter enought (without getting them arrested instantly).

    Amazing. But, 4%? Unless you're doing a LOT of it, couldn't you just mow lawns or something and make the same money while also being less fat?
    • That's 4% in a couple of days. That is a huge return. If you did one scam a week, you'd get 200% return a year. If you put $100k in, you'd make $200k in one year!
    • Now think about it, these are the same people who figure the road to wealth is scratch tickets and sitting in front of a slot machine all day. Are you surprised that they would gamble on an email out of nowhere on something they no nothing about?

      I wouldn't act on it unless it came from my old inside contact at Enron. Shhhhhh!
  • Then the next time you get one of these, you should buy the stock ASAP and also profit, along with the original spammer. This can really get out of hand.
  • I know this is off-topic, but you gotta check-out the picture in the article. The young hacker spammer guy in that "Scooore!" pose is hilarious! And the older non-geek guy behind him with the bewildered look emphasizes the point.

    Perhaps this will inspire many would-be advisors to send spam about how to make money fast by sending spam emails about stocks. If it works, then it will inspire more spammers to send spam about how to make money sending spam about how to make money fast by sending spam emails ab
  • stock returns (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward
    So the US stock market hisorically has returned over 10% a year, current yields on low-risk money market funds is over 5% and US Treasury funds historically have generated at least 5% a year as well.

    So you can invest in a cheap index fund in any of the above and beat what these guys are doing. Or, you could run a pump and dump stock scam and risk huge jail time instead. This also doesn't include paying taxes on all your stock transactions which will lower your return even further. Sounds like a great deal t
  • Not a problem (Score:4, Insightful)

    by MaelstromX ( 739241 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @02:59PM (#15981059)
    Maybe I'm out of the mainstream on this but I don't see this as an issue at all.

    I don't like spam any more than anybody else does here but it's an unfortunate fact of life that is here to stay as long as we are using the current e-mail system. Getting mad at people for spamming under this system of total anonymity and lack of accountability is like getting mad at your cat for eating the food you left on the kitchen table before you left. All we can really do is find a way to deal with the spam while we think of a new way to go about things.

    That said, compared to other spams this is relatively benign. Who is hurt here (besides the fact that it clogs our inboxes and spam filters, which as I said is a fact of life and is going to happen anyway)? Are we afraid that people will be tricked into buying these stocks and then lose money when they plummet? Because that sounds to me like a good way to teach people not to take financial advice from complete strangers. The law is not for babying people and shielding them from all discomfort; sometimes people need to take a lesson or two at the school of hard knocks.
    • by hacker ( 14635 )

      I don't like spam any more than anybody else does here but it's an unfortunate fact of life that is here to stay as long as we are using the current e-mail system.

      What's a spam?

      Seriously, since I've put dspam + graymilter on our mailserver, we haven't seen a SINGLE SPAM slip through in several YEARS now. Sure, we get false positives from time to time, but not a single spam slips through, at ALL.

      I don't have to deal with it, and I don't have to change to a different email system either. Problem solve

  • long term (Score:3, Informative)

    by Anonymous Coward on Friday August 25, 2006 @03:23PM (#15981296)
    While it is interesting to see the return for the spammer, check out the return for the sucker that buys them. http://www.spamstocktracker.com/ [spamstocktracker.com]
  • I get 5.05% from an insured HSBC internet savings account. I can get 5.15% from various other similar companies.

    So they spend the time and risk the legal ramifacations of sending millions of SPAM e-mails to get, at best .85% better than a opening a savings account at a bank?

    They're idiots.
    • by vidarh ( 309115 )
      Eh.. Yes, you get that per year. Exactly where was it you got the impression that the quoted returns were per year from?

      Did you read this bit:

      The team found that a spammer who bought shares the day before starting an e-mail campaign and then sold them the day after could make a return on his or her investment of 4.9%.

      How long do you think their campaigns are?

    • You're the idiot. You could make about 2 percent more on not just a insured savings account, but a government guaranteed I-bond. 6% in a few days beats 5% in a year...
  • So, it works. Good to know. Now use their scam in your advantage

    When you recieve the spam, use the system. Wait a day or two, then buy put-options or sell short. What went up will come down, at least the same 4% probably.
    • by rekoil ( 168689 )
      This brings an interesting question - while it's clearly illegal to pump and dump, is it legal to short stocks for which you've gotten a spam touting? Is the spam run something that would fit the legal definition of public information (particularly if it gets forwarded to n.a.n.a.s.)?

      Also, keep in mind that most brokerages won't let you short penny stocks. There's generally a minimum price per share before you can sell a stock short.
  • by D4C5CE ( 578304 ) on Friday August 25, 2006 @05:36PM (#15982348)
    ...should be able to trigger a rather thorough search for those responsible (who can hardly not leave quite a significant paper&data trail), and land them in jail for ages - so where's the prosecution? Their case can only be helped by identity theft typically additionally committed by many spammers.

    Going after these subjects also beats confiscating Jaguars and digging for spam gold... especially if they're actually making 6% in a few days, per campaign.

    Who cares that spam may not be a crime in some places - securities scams of these proportions certainly are, and no less if perpetrated by eMail.

  • Raw data and graphs of activity are available here: http://cyber.law.harvard.edu/stockspam/ [harvard.edu]
  • A recent study on spam has revealed that spammers see a return between 4.9% and 6% when selling stocks they have bought low and spammed the world with.

    Is that a 4.9% to 6% return per year? Per month? Per indeterminate period of time? It makes a huge difference.

    This reminds me of lines like "the average home uses 10 killowatts of electricity per year."

    Start making sense, Media! ;)
    • From the article it would apppear that the return is quote per trade, so assuming a holding period (i.e., the amount of time their capital is locked up) of two days, a return of 5% over this period is equivalent to an annual return of roughly 500% ( (5%/2+1)^252), or 503.9% precisely, with 252 being the number of trading days in a year.

      It's probably easiest to think of this as a very high rate deposit product that you invest in at 5% over a two day period, and reinvest every two days for entire year. Your
  • One interesting thing about stock spam is that the spam email doesn't need to contain a link to an online shop or something where you can actually buy the advertised product. That makes it even harder to track.
    • by Ilgaz ( 86384 )
      Not just that, it even doesn't include human/filter readable text anymore. They do some gif (or html) trick so the spam is in fact a "picture" which would require OCR. I am not sure about OCR as all OCR software runs perfect on 300 DPI, not some pixel text.

      Only way is to find/enable respected RBL lists.
      • by Phroggy ( 441 ) *
        I've just set up a SpamAssassin plugin called FuzzyOcr [apache.org], which is designed for exactly this purpose. It converts the image into a bitmap format in multiple ways (including analyzing individual frames of an animated GIF, since spammers sometimes use that trick), as well as various color filters, then uses gocr [sourceforge.net] to convert the results to text, which is matched against a (customizable) word list with Perl's String::Approx module.

        The OCR is terrible. I suggest using the latest developer release of gocr, as it s
  • (sarcasm)
    Wow! A whole whopping 6%!
    (/sarcasm)

    I get a 5% return on my CD and I don't have to send out email and try to manipulate the stock market or do anything that might land me in jail.

    2 cents,

    QueenB

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