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Comment Re:The old struggling to fight off the new (Score 1) 260

And come on -- given how much publicity there was over the dude who was killed by the falling tree branch/tire swing, how many deaths from fire at an Airbnb property do you really think could sneak under the radar? That's why I challenged you to simply find one.

The reason that one incident got so much publicity was because the family of the victim was able to recover "sufficient" renumeration from the insurance company of the property owners. They never signed any agreements with AirBnB.

The articles about that death covered the fact that AirBnB sweeps in with cash in exchange for confidentiality in the event of mishap, effectively hiding most deaths' associations with AirBnB.

Comment Re:Not even close to Speeding (Score 2) 260

Actually, what *I* want is for the government to leave alone owner-occupied homes that they rent out all or part of for part of the year, while cracking down entirely on short-term rentals in residential zoning for houses and apartments that aren't owner occupied.

If you're renting it short term, and you aren't doing so as a secondary use to your own residence as the owner, then your doing commercial renting and should be subject to all commercial renting rules and regulations, including zoning regulations.

Wow, that covers all of your extreme examples.

Comment Re: The DNC overlords always get their way (Score 4, Informative) 644

Democrats controlled the senate with a supermajority for about 17 weeks, from the delayed confirmation of Al Franken to the death of Ted Kennedy.

Just exactly how much legislation do you think they should have crammed in to those weeks? The fact that they only got one piece of major legislation through is to me testament to the fact that they were taking their time to do things right instead of pushing through more pre-written, unread garbage.

Comment Re:Actual repor link: (Score 1) 109

Anecdotal, but what I've seen is that the panels survive better than a typical asphalt roof. Those get beat up pretty bad in hail storms, but it takes a lucky strike at just the right angle to crack a solar panel; otherwise the hail just bounces off.

Now a tin roof of course would last longer than either, but most people don't invest in those.

Comment Re:Math (Score 3, Informative) 109

One 35-year old working unit isn't proof, it's an anecdote. For proof you need statistics. And those are... math!?!?!

Interestingly enough, you might not even need one unit to have reached 35 years old for the statistics to yield that age. For example, do you not believe that the half life of Thorium 229 is 7340 years? We certainly haven't observed a sample that long, yet we understand how the decay process works and can thus use statistics to extrapolate a relevant average decay period. Similarly, if we humans understand the aging mechanisms of solar panels well enough, including knowledge that there are no threshold events that cause the decay to change to a newer, faster model, then it's reasonable to look at the start of the curve, fit it to the known methods, and advance it to extrapolate a useful life.

Comment Re:Not surprising (Score 1) 165

Not that I like bitcoin, but it's farming ASICs aren't magic money-printing machines. They are electricity-consuming (pseudo-)money-printing machines.

Someone could conceivably design and build the ASIC, and sell the ASIC, but not want to invest the resources or pay the costs associated with actual farming. It's sort-of like multi-level marketing companies like Mary Kay or whatever. They could sell their own products and keep more of the revenue, but then they'd have to pay the costs associated with retail business (salary, shipping) when instead they can sell the raw product and let some third-party person try to make the rest while taking on all the costs.

Comment Re:Fiat demand via taxes (Score 1) 165

Not only that, but the sovereign debt of the U.S. is issued in U.S. dollars. Lots of governments and individuals around the world own U.S. debt, and they are all invested in the dollar remaining strong so as to maintain the value of that investment.

And this ignores commerce conducted in U.S. dollars, like the international oil market, which while beneficial to the dollar as a whole, could probably be swapped out for another currency (the yuan renminbi I assume at this point, given that the euro doesn't look too good) if given enough notice.

Comment Re:Tesla's Autopilot is in the "uncanny valley" (Score 1) 440

You are defining "driving" to mean exactly what you want it to mean. To the vast majority of people operating the gas pedal is a component of "driving" yet you just dismissed cruise control as not "[taking] the driving from you and [doing] it for you." Same for adaptive cruise control (automatic acceleration and braking), lane keeping (automatic steering decision). Go back enough decades and ABS brakes (automatic brake pumping), timed windshield wipers (automatic periodic windscreen cleaning), auto tranmissions (automatic shifting) are also "doing the driving for you".

I think we're wired to see new things as annoyances once we get old enough. That's why people stop liking new things. In every case of something that existed when I learned to drive, it's a useful component that lets me concentrate on something else (except automatic transmissions - those just make driving less fun), while everything that's come along later (adaptive cruise control, lane keeping, Tesla's autopilot) could be seen as new annoyances. Same for whatever that music stuff is they put out on the radio now between the DJs laughing.

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