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America Online

AOL to be Split into 4 Units 294

unsupported writes "AOL is apparently dividing into four units to provide a clear direction for each. The four divisions are as follows: Audience (Advertising, and AOL IM, Moviefon, Mapquest, Netscape.com), Access (dial-up, highspeed), AOL Europe (for the foreigners), and Digital Services (Premium services, phone and music subscription). "
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AOL to be Split into 4 Units

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  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:14PM (#10767025)
    They form the lamest robot in the entire universe... AOLtron!
  • Quick Question... (Score:3, Interesting)

    by FortKnox ( 169099 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:14PM (#10767029) Homepage Journal
    ...... and how is this news?

    Seriously. AOL probably already operated this way anyway, so what's the big whoop?
    • by Timesprout ( 579035 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:26PM (#10767158)
      The big whoop is they probably paid some management consultancy group a library of congress sized amount of money to formalize what they were already doing under the guise of a complete management reorganisation.
      • by dykofone ( 787059 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:33PM (#10767233) Homepage
        You hit it. Large corporations go through a reogranization almost annually. I've gone through two in the past year with two different companies. The managers and high-ups make a huge deal about it (rightly so, since it's stuff like that that keeps em in a job) while everyone else just goes "yeah alright, so my division got renamed. yippee."

        I think its mostly to create some buzz amongst the investors and shareholders, who think a reorganization means increased efficiency and therefore huge profits. Plus, it allows for new banners with fancy slogans and missions statements to be hung on the wall, and to keep everyone up to date on the latest corporate slang (a reorganization is really nothing more than lots of little paradigm shifts to better utilize the synergistic capabilities of our capital-index work force, etc)

        • by unother ( 712929 )
          Reorgs provide tax benefits.

          See? As always, it's about the benjamins.

          EOT.
        • Large corporations go through a reogranization almost annually. I've gone through two in the past year with two different companies. The managers and high-ups make a huge deal about it (rightly so, since it's stuff like that that keeps em in a job) while everyone else just goes "yeah alright, so my division got renamed. yippee."

          I used to work for a major Aircraft Flight Simulator company headquartered in Kirkwood NY. The company used to be refered to as the "Cadillac of Flight Simulators"

          Toward the en

    • Corporate reorgs are not usually front page material.
    • by gilesjuk ( 604902 )
      I don't know what the big deal is, but Microsoft always opposed being split up, yet they should follow suit.

      Something like this:

      Microsoft OS Inc
      Microsoft Office Tech Inc
      Microsoft Web tech Inc
      Microsoft Consumer Products Inc

      Of course it won't happen as Microsoft's OS and Office Tech companies would make all the money, the Web tech and Consumer Products divisions would go bust.
      • I don't know what the big deal is, but Microsoft always opposed being split up, yet they should follow suit.

        Microsoft opposed being forced into becoming multiple companies. AOL isn't doing that - they are just formalizing internal business units. I think this will be good for them in that it could give VP's more power make decisions independent of the other units. I'm sure Microsoft already does this. Of course, this would make it simpler to split into seperate companies in the future and make it more

      • Hell, even if it was:

        Microsoft OS

        Microsoft Software (office/IE/etc),Web,Hardware,Services

        That would make me happy. Just unlink all the extra crap fromt he OS please!

    • by stienman ( 51024 ) <adavis@ubaBOHRsics.com minus physicist> on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:36PM (#10767263) Homepage Journal
      AOL probably already operated this way anyway, so what's the big whoop?

      The biggest difference is that all the old infighting and contempt is offical, and can be reported on and monitered since it must cross interdepartmental divisions. Previously it was hard to track since it was intradepartemental.

      Wars and power struggles are much more open. Further, it provides a new battlefield - all the commanders welcome this change since the wars were getting rather stale and predictable. Hopefully the new revolution will be streamed.

      -Adam
    • by Infonaut ( 96956 )
      ... and how is this news?

      This is marginally interesting to me for a few reasons:

      • AOL was probably the single most influential company in the early days of the online revolution. More people got online in the late 1980s and early 1990s because of AOL than any other company. It wasn't the Internet, and it had problems, but it was still the first step for millions of people. In that regard what happens to AOL is interesting in an anthropological/historical sense.
      • The fact that AOL is restructuring themselve
    • Meatwad: Quick question here... is it zesty ranch flavored?
      Frylock: No, it's bean flavored.
      Meatwad: Yuck city, have fun eating it, because I'm eating this.
  • by samurairas ( 666175 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:15PM (#10767030)
    I was so worried about their financial well being! I'm nearly out of coasters.
  • Doh! (Score:5, Funny)

    by Zemplar ( 764598 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:15PM (#10767038) Journal
    "AOL is apparently dividing into four units to provide a clear direction for each. The four divisions are as follows: Audience (Advertising, and AOL IM, Moviefon, Mapquest, Netscape.com), Access (dial-up, highspeed), AOL Europe (for the foreigners), and Digital Services (Premium services, phone and music subscription)."

    None of which will regain profitability.
    • Re:Doh! (Score:5, Funny)

      by afree87 ( 102803 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:18PM (#10767074) Journal
      Yeah, I can sure see America Online doing well in Europe.
      • You do realise that AOL already operated in Europe before this, right? I see their ads on TV all the time.
      • Re:Doh! (Score:5, Funny)

        by Zemplar ( 764598 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:27PM (#10767165) Journal
        Perhaps they could change thier name to Anti-America Online to improve their European image?
        • Re:Doh! (Score:3, Funny)

          by OrangeTide ( 124937 )
          If AOL wants to improve their European image maybe they should rebrand themselves as BLO, Bin Laden Online? Then it could be a real terrorist network!

          I wonder if the Terrorist Network is IPv6 compliant.
        • AOL Europe (for the foreigners)

          You know, you look at the occasional post from a European that comments that "not everyone lives in America" and you assume that they're just complaining too much.

          Then you see the above quoted line.

          I'm beginning to they might have a point.

          They still talk funny though. ;)

      • Probably branded AOL, much like KFC, which, God help us, is doing well in Europe.
      • Here in Germany, they have these pathetic adverts that try to fool people into thinking AOL is short for Alles OnLine ("everything online"). They are doing fairly well, though, they have a huge number of users. The relative numbers might be about the same as in the US, in fact, but I'm not sure.
    • My guess is their intention is not to have 4 units so each can regain profitability (which would be nice) but to maybe funnel some of the expenses towards one or two units.*

      What expenses? I don't know, the half a billion dollar legal defense fund they've set up [timesonline.co.uk]. Which as an aside, is kind of a fucking stupid idea. It's like walking into a Mercedes dealer with a check for $150,000 and saying "What can I get?" ("Why, sir, this luxury edition E-class has so much more eagle. It saddens me to think of you missi
      • I predict the lawyer's fees will be around $500m. Bravo, smartasses.

        Before going into litigation using outside counsel, companies often will look to cap maximum expenses involved, and have anything over that reviewed by internal counsel. SCO's just the most visible to do this of late, but they're far from alone.
    • None of which will regain profitability.

      That's ok, because with four units, they can make it up in *volume*
  • 4 Units? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Thunderstruck ( 210399 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:16PM (#10767045)
    Does this mean I can get four times as many drink-coasters every month? I just moved into a bigger place, so I need some.

    Seriously though, will this provide newfound independence for the Netscape folks, and newfound options for the browsers associated with them? Or will it just be a management shift that has no practical effect on the rest of the world?
    • Re:4 Units? (Score:5, Funny)

      by Timesprout ( 579035 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:32PM (#10767215)
      No,each division sending you a CD each month would be just stupid now wouldn't it. Obviously each division will only send a 1/4 segment of a cd to you each month which you can glue toegther to form a coaster at your leisure.
    • Re:4 Units? (Score:2, Funny)

      by harrkev ( 623093 )
      Nope. Only one coaster each month. The company is being split up into four separate pieces:

      1) Coaster distribution - responsible for loading landfills with non-biodegradable chunks of worthless platic. Of course, a lot of these discs should be distributed with PC magazines, which are read by people who should already know better than to use AOL.

      2) Moron recruitment - Dedicated to finding the dumbest of the dumb and encouraging them to POST IN ALL CAPS on every forum imaginable. They also believe that
    • This seems to be what big corps do from time to time to regain a few points in the market.

      Remember way back when, when Atari (then owned by Warner), was split into the Arcade, Home Computer, and Consoles divisions? Did it change anything? Not really. Atari still died a slow, horrible death - although at least the new owners of the name help it sorta live on...

      But Time-Warner certainly aren't the only ones who do this. I've watched G.E. spilt up divisions, only to put them back together again in six months
    • Re:4 Units? (Score:2, Informative)

      by goodydot ( 749400 )
      Anybody notice that CDs make REALLY BAD coasters? The condensation from the drink tends to run through the hole in the middle and around the outside. Then, you not only get a ring on your table, you get a wet CD which tends to stick to the drink. It also creates a more slippery surface, so the drink tends to slide off the CD. Cans are a little better in this regard, but you still get all that run-off. AOL needs to start shipping out absorbant CDs, perhaps making them from soapstone. I know it seems a
  • You forgot the 5th unit, which is more important then the rest.

    It's the "Me too!" unit.

    -= Stefan
  • by suso ( 153703 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:16PM (#10767052) Homepage Journal
    The last thing AOL needs is a focused advertising unit.
  • by Ieshan ( 409693 ) <ieshan@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:17PM (#10767062) Homepage Journal
    AOL still has a few more years left in them. Cable and DSL haven't quite become ubiquitous, and there are enough people in the "heartland" who aren't familiar enough with the Internet to know better.

    Their new commercials purport to make the Internet better - that's the market AOL has to reach, people who think their software is the Internet.

    It doesn't have much longer, though. Education will put AOL to a slow death unless they drastically reform their business to revolve around the things they do get right (like messaging) instead of "access" and "customer support" (both in scare quotes for obvious reasons).
    • AOL still has a few more years left in them. Cable and DSL haven't quite become ubiquitous, and there are enough people in the "heartland" who aren't familiar enough with the Internet to know better.

      Their new commercials purport to make the Internet better - that's the market AOL has to reach, people who think their software is the Internet.


      People with Cable/DSL still have their AOL accounts and use it over Broadband because they don't want to lose their email account, they don't want to lose all the "wo

      • People with Cable/DSL still have their AOL accounts and use it over Broadband because they don't want to lose their email account, they don't want to lose all the "wonderful" extras that AOL provides, and they don't want to know that they have been getting ripped off for 10 years by using their service.

        Education will put AOL to a slow death unless they drastically reform their business to revolve around the things they do get right (like messaging) instead of "access" and "customer support" (both in scar
        • by pen ( 7191 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @02:16PM (#10767681)

          AOL had live video streams of the presidential debates. You could not see them anywhere on the "plain" Internet. I didn't watch the presidential debates, but I'm sure that a lot of people would like to.

          If you're into mainstream content, AOL does give you more than just the free stuff on the Internet. They have the clout to make deals with the mainstream content providers to offer this content.

          Doesn't do anything for me personally, but there's some truth to what they claim.

  • by YetAnotherName ( 168064 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:17PM (#10767066) Homepage
    The new units will be called:
    • AOL Audiece/Time/Warner
    • AOL Access/Time/Warner
    • AOL Europe/Time/Warner
    • AOL Digital/Time/Warner

    Maybe if you split the Time and the Warner parts off, you'd have even clearer direction, AOL?

    • by WindBourne ( 631190 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:44PM (#10767343) Journal

      TimeWarner is not the problem. The problem is AOL is trying to compete in the exact same space as MSN and will always lose. MSN is able to better integrate into Windows. MSN will always be the first choice on the OS.etc, etc, etc.

      AOL needs to learn to carry the fight to a different battleground; basically a neutral ground.

      1. Make Firefox/Mozilla the default (with MSIE an option)
      2. Provide OpenOffice on their system.
      3. Start using a media system that is on multiple systems. The ogg line is certainly a choice as are a number of others.
      Then allow customers to run that for about a year. Finally, create a Linux distro for the home user that includes all the above. They can call it AOS. It will enable them to compete.

      What they need to do, but they will not do it. History simply repeats itself.

  • It has to be said (Score:2, Insightful)

    by TheJaff ( 714004 )
    Will cd-r manufacturers be able to keep up?
  • ...4 seperate units with clearly designed roles ....

    umm, given how abstract that collection looks, I'd say they need to divide into about 5 MORE groups or atleast better defined/organize groups. Haven't these people ever designed a Db?
    .

    1. telecomm (subscriptions, and telephony)
    2. media (music & movies)
    3. Advertising

    Do they just try too hard to be elitest?
  • Their time has come, (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Moby Cock ( 771358 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:22PM (#10767107) Homepage
    AOL was marketed as an ISP for non technical people. This justified that added expense. Most families these days have at least one member who know at least a little bit about computing and sees that AOL is not needed. Its cheaper to get access from someone else and add the features you want. I suppose its because the internet has been around long enough for the general public (say 10 years of real viable public access?) so that either the adults have taken an interest or they have kids who know a great deal about it all. Seriously, AOL is just not worth the added expense. This new racket about including free anti-virus and spyware blocking is not going to change anything. Breaking into four main organisation is not the answer either. What they need to do is set their prices competitively and get some innovative content.
  • Sell off (Score:3, Insightful)

    by RealProgrammer ( 723725 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:22PM (#10767111) Homepage Journal
    This sets the stage to spin the pieces off into separate companies, or to sell them.

    I doubt AOL-TimeWarner has much AOL left once the "Baby AOLs" are operating a little more independently.
  • by rubberbando ( 784342 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:22PM (#10767119)
    I'm suddenly imagining their little yellow logo guy being drawn and quartered....not pretty.. :-P
  • by xmas2003 ( 739875 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:23PM (#10767122) Homepage
    The Open Directory Project (ODP) at dmoz.org [dmoz.org] is the "largest human-edited directory in the world" and is "owned" by AOL since it came from Netscape ... although it's mostly community volunteers helping out, although AOL provides hardware and some staffing assistance.
  • They used to be all lined up facing the music, now they're in four different parts of the deck, looking for a life boat. They're sunk, they're doomed. Stick a fork in AOL. They're done.

    And, this isn't trolling - this is just looking at the facts of AOL's business. They're completely surrounded by superior services that cost less and don't have the "Me Too!" stigma attached. I was wondering when AOL was going to start splitting itself up. Keep an eye open for it to sell each of these divisions off to a com

  • by mikeophile ( 647318 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:25PM (#10767147)
    My first thought at seeing the headline.

  • This makes sense because they are loosing such market share in their dial up business splitting their company up makes it easier to keep the profitable entities alive while looking for somewhere to dump the unprofitable ones.

    Nick Powers
  • by Val314 ( 219766 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:26PM (#10767154)
    i thought printing & shipping CDs was their main task
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Leelo Time-Warner Multipass!
  • Oh, the sweet, entertaining smell of a massive, corporate clusterfuck. :-)

    Edna! Whip up a batch of poppycorn. Dis here is gonna be a good one, yesiree bob!

  • Is AOL (Access) or AOL (Audience) sending me these CDs?

    If YOU want to get rid of them send them to:
    No More AOL CDs!
    1601 Navellier St.
    El Cerrito CA, 94530
    U.S.A.

    http://www.nomoreaolcds.com/ [nomoreaolcds.com]
  • What it really sounds like is them deciding how to better divide the blame for lost subscriptions.
  • by PornMaster ( 749461 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:28PM (#10767186) Homepage
    Restructuring seems to be the way Boards of Directors justifies layoffs, blaming the placement of the "walls" for poor performance, rather than looking at lacking innovation, morale, and business savvy.

    Besides the already-commented-about possibility of selling off parts, in this day and age the notion of dividing up divisions of a company differently just seems to fly in the face of the path of the enlightened employer of the 21st century.

    By segmenting into distinct groups, you facilitate the blame game and hamper communication. This kind of restructuring certainly isn't what you do to revitalize.
  • by IceFox ( 18179 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:30PM (#10767199) Homepage
    This looks like your classic, need to make some noise and reshuffle the company while not actually doing anything with the company. A way for CEO's to justify their jobs. Just from the summery you can see massive crossover of the different units that will be the downfall of this massive re-org.

    "In the days ahead, when our transition to a new structure has been completed, we will have a streamlined organization with clear roles and responsibilities"

    In other words... "Well try this for a while to see if it works or now, I don't actually have a clue if it will or not". And in reality it is nothing more then a cover for...

    "especially at a time like this when we have announced plans for layoffs."

    In other words: "CEO bonus here I come!" And I can't leave out this jewel:

    "giving each [unit] responsibility for its own operations and financial performance."

    So you have developer x in group 1 and group 2 needs developers x skills, but they have to first put in a REQ and get financiall approval or even worse hiring a new person and meanwhile developer x sits around idly. I predict project slowdowns stock dropping and in 12 months a "New Plan".

    -Benjamin Meyer

  • There's a great Slate article that discusses the problems AOL is having and how their new ads don't help matters any for them.
    • You have to admit the ad with Jerry Stiller and Snoop Dogg collecting CDs to make that fish art project was funny.

      It's an ad blatantly admitting to sending you excessive amounts of junk mail. At least the tins included later on were actually useful. I keep stickers in them.

      I wonder if that ad agency still has that contract with AOL.
  • I heard an ad on the radio yesterday for netscape internet, for $9.95 a month (www.getnetscape.com). Apparently they are trying to compete with netzero. I wonder which of the 4 groups this will be a part of.
    • BTW, I found their fine print a bit funny:

      *Web Accelerator can load certain Web page text and graphics faster than with a standard 56k dial-up Internet service. Actual speeds may vary. **Pop-up Blocker requires Internet Explorer® 5.5 or higher. *** E-mail acceleration may not be compatible with certain computer systems.
  • by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:35PM (#10767256)
    The 4 units will be named:
    - Overcharging
    - Limiting/Reducing Quality of Service
    - Cancellation Deflection/Avoidance
    - Demo CD Manufacturing and Distribution

    Not to worry, they will all be guided by AOL's core mission: TO SUCK!
  • by Gallenod ( 84385 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:38PM (#10767283)
    Apparently prayer does work, as AOL has finally drawn and quartered itself.

    Eventually, it will reduce itself to 64 small startup sized companies, 63 of which will fail. Just what I've always wanted to see: a living example of the DotCom bubble in reverse.

    What's next? Maybe Microsoft will join them in self-dismemberment?

    (Pray early, pray often...)

  • Does this mean the stock will split too?
  • "We are going to try to be much crisper in decision-making," Miller said in an interview. "It is about having clarity of mission and purpose."

    Oh! Gosh! Is that what's it's all about? Thinking clearly? Damn! And here I was wasting my time with muddled thinking and piffly nonsense! Argh! Damn my simian decended brain! Why can't I be a being of pure knowledge like our glorious MBA annointed masters?

    And this guy probably makes 20 times my salary despite the fact that my job involves deep knowledge of the u

  • As if I wasn't getting enough free CD's in my mailbox, now I'll get four a day instead of simply 1.

    Now That's progress.
  • the folks at aol are going to have to face the reality that dialup is just not as relevant as it once was.

    there are many ways to connect to the net and bypass their filtered system and filtered content.

    their software cannot be controlled (it downloads updates on its own), their model is becoming obsolete, and their subscriber base has always been the un-net-educated.

    as users become more sophisticated, they move away from aol because aol is incapable of providing that next step of service.

    if tw/aol had a
  • AOL Europe? (Score:3, Funny)

    by jxyama ( 821091 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @01:52PM (#10767410)
    now that it stands on its own, it sounds even more contradictory :

    America Online Europe

    (i know, i know, no one in Europe really needs to know what "A" in "AOL" stands for...)

  • Is Time Warner part of any of those divisions?
  • First consolidation was "IN". They gobbled up Time warner to become AOL-Time Warner. Then consolidation became "OUT" concept and they were spun off after being blamed for being the loss leader of the group. Now they are splitting into smaller pieces, to merge again in the future.. Story never changes. AOL is the same behemoth despite however many pieces you divide or adjoin it. It is just for a Wall Street only show. Nothing for you and me, the Joe/Jane the customer in it. We are not invited to see the play
  • Although restructuring is a ceo's task to cover someone else's butt or his(traditionally)

    This may actually be beneficial to aol. AOL has always been the ISP for the internet newbie, and if the reorganization can help their broadband division actually give good services that are worth paying for, they may stick around.

    As of now, their broadband and dial-up services have different aims, and you can not really keep those two together in the same division. AOL has got to step up and deliver a broadband serv
  • by jafac ( 1449 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @02:07PM (#10767586) Homepage
    I've been around the whole dotcom phenomenon long enought to recognize this very typical tactic.

    When a company divides into independent units, that means that they're prepping a division for sale or dismantlement.
    Typically, you'll see a geographical component to the division, so that ties can be severed cleanly, and there's more of a financial gain (facilities expense goes away, HR effort to maintain the separate health insurance, legal climante, tax burden, etc. goes away).

    The function of whichever unit goes, will be outsourced.

    If you're an employee of one of these units, start looking for the danger signs.

    Is the cost of living in your region higher than others?
    Did the higher-up officers at your site relocate to some other site?
    Do they remodel other sites, but not yours?
    Do they fail to change the lightbulbs when they burn out?
    Did they close your site's cafeteria?
    Did they eliminate your onsite IT group in favor of "remote support"?
    Do officers visit less and less frequently to share corporate news or policy?
    Is there a hiring freeze at your location?
    When was the last time you got a new desktop machine?
    When was the last time you got training?
    Does your site have a security presence 24x7?

    Funniest bit is when they retag all the assets. Then in future years, you know your site is next when you get all the assets from the first site they shut down, with their old asset tags.
  • AOL Europe (for the foreigners)

    Was that supposed to be funny?
    • Personaly, it find it funny that europeans would log into America Online, but that's just me. Or is it called Europe Online across the pond, and you're all just left wondering why your email adresses are @aol?
  • That will be their new name.
  • "AOL est omnis divisa in partes quattuor" /sorry julius
  • What kind of name is this?

    America Online Europe


    Why isn't it the rational:

    Europe Online

  • Create four layers of bureaucracy, management, and infrastructure where there used to be only one?!

    It sort of makes since if Time/Warner wants AOL to fail as an excuse to dump it. But for any other reason, it makes no sense to me.

  • by PMuse ( 320639 ) on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @02:36PM (#10767892)
    Bulletin: On instructions from the US Dept of Homeland Security, AOL has agreed to rename its AOL Europe unit. In accordance with Bush Administration Policy, the unit will now be known as EOL (for the foreigners).

    See you on the game grid,
    MCP
  • by BattleTroll ( 561035 ) <battletroll2002@yahoo.com> on Tuesday November 09, 2004 @02:38PM (#10767912)
    A newly appointed CEO has a conversation with the man he is replacing. The new guy asks, "what advice can you give me?". The old dog opens up a drawer and pulls out three envelopes.

    "When you get into trouble the first time, open up letter number one and do what it tells you. When it happens again, use letter number two. And when it happens the third time, read letter number three."

    With that, the old dog laughs and walks out the building.

    A month later the new CEO is on the hotseat for missing the quarterly EPS mark. Right before the earnings conference call he reads letter number one - 'Blame me'. So the new CEO goes to the mike, blames the old CEO for bad management, and everyone walks away optimistic.

    Three months later, the new CEO is on the hotseat again. He reads letter number two - 'Reorganize' So the new CEO tells everyone that the company is going to do a massive reorganization "to realign our business units with our core market paradigms.". The reporters grumble but accept the idea that the company is now on the right track.

    Three months later, the new CEO is yet again facing major difficulties. He reads the last letter. 'Get three envelopes.'

    *buhbumpbump*
  • n00Bs?

    Oh wait. Never mind...

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