Slashdot is powered by your submissions, so send in your scoop

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×
United States

US Govt Makes Times New Roman 14 Official Font 811

pollux03 writes "According to ABC news, 'In an internal memorandum distributed on Wednesday, the department declared "Courier New 12" - the font and size decreed for US diplomatic documents for years - to be obsolete and unacceptable after February 1. "In response to many requests and with a view to making our written work easier to read, we are moving to a new standard font: 'Times New Roman 14'," said the memorandum. ' The report goes on to cite a few exceptions to the rule including official telegraphs."
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

US Govt Makes Times New Roman 14 Official Font

Comments Filter:
  • Exceptions (Score:5, Funny)

    by Joe U ( 443617 ) * on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:35AM (#8169102) Homepage Journal
    There are only three exceptions to the draconian new typographical rules: telegrams, treaty materials prepared by the State Department's legal affairs office and documents drawn up for the president's signature, it said.

    As those will all be done in the MS Comic Font.
    • by Drathus ( 152223 ) * on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:38AM (#8169145)
      Don't forget about the "Super Secret" communications.

      'Encrypted "Super Secret" communications will be done with Wingdings 16'
      • by Anonymous Custard ( 587661 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:42AM (#8169220) Homepage Journal
        Don't forget about the "Super Secret" communications. 'Encrypted "Super Secret" communications will be done with Wingdings 16'

        This message is in violation of the DMCA for circumventing encryption techniques.
      • by dasmegabyte ( 267018 ) <das@OHNOWHATSTHISdasmegabyte.org> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:07PM (#8169558) Homepage Journal
        And all documents from the Department of Homeland Security should be formatted in 16 point "Spooky" font. Preferrably in red.
    • by MuParadigm ( 687680 ) <jgabriel66@yahoo.com> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:59AM (#8169449) Homepage Journal

      Times New Roman instead Garamond? What were those aesthetically clueless dingbats thinking?

      That's it. I've completely lost faith in our government, and political processes in general. If they can't ascertain Garamond's clear superiority to TNR, well, they'll just have to impeached, that's all.

      And sent for serious rehabilitation. And re-training, with those methods used for de-programming cult victims.

      I mean, seriously, TNR over Garamond? I ask you...

      • Re:Not Garamond? (Score:5, Insightful)

        by WillAdams ( 45638 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:16PM (#8169684) Homepage
        Unfortunately, Garamond isn't readily available to all systems the government is likely to be purchasing / using, so the choice of Times New Roman (a Windows core font, and available on all Macs which have Internet Explorer installed) makes good fiscal sense.

        William
      • Why not computer modern, then? If you've ever read a document written in Computer Modern, you won't be using anything else anytime soon :)

        I don't think people even bother to read LaTeX'd documents, they're so beautiful that you just look at it and drool.

        (For a while I had the window titles and mozilla using CM, but it's HEAVILY optimized for print, so I stopped using it for that)
        • Re:Not Garamond? (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Bob Uhl ( 30977 )
          Well, it's not so much Computer Modern which is beautiful as it is the TeX layout algorithms which yield beauty. TeX could make an eviction notice pretty.

          Why anyone uses anything besides LaTeX to prepare documents is beyond me. Complete control of glyph composition; astoundingly beautiful and readable styles; PostScript rendering; BibTeX: it's truly the most magnificent thing going.

    • by WIAKywbfatw ( 307557 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:14PM (#8169655) Journal
      Is that all US government reports now have to have to be accompanied by "the correct cover sheet". Oh, and all White House press conferences must have at least "fifteen pieces of flair".
    • by pezpunk ( 205653 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:20PM (#8169735) Homepage
      "In response to many requests and with a view to making our written work easier to read, we are moving to a new standard font: 'Times New Roman 14'," said the memorandum.

      this is pretty amazing. back 13 years ago in 1991 i was working for the Army Materiel Command Headquarters and i repeatedly got a "talking to" from my bosses for using Times instead of Courier in official correspondence to other departments. i then went to the head of AMC HQ and suggested a change in policy to allow Times New Roman to also be acceptable, since we were now in the computer age, and not limited to typewriters and daisy-wheel printers, and since Times New Roman was demonstrably easier to read, and more attractive. He took my request to the Chief of Staff of the Army, who shot it down.

      i was ahead of my time!
  • Damn. (Score:5, Funny)

    by American AC in Paris ( 230456 ) * on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:37AM (#8169126) Homepage
    I had my money on 20 point Dingbat.
  • by The One KEA ( 707661 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:37AM (#8169127) Journal
    Instead of actually doing something useful, they sit around and argue over the right font to use.

    Dear God.
    • by badasscat ( 563442 ) <basscadet75@@@yahoo...com> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:39AM (#8169166)
      Instead of actually doing something useful, they sit around and argue over the right font to use.

      And we sit around arguing over their arguments. Which is worse?
      • by Moraelin ( 679338 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:33PM (#8169946) Journal
        You've never had to talk with the customer's PHB about some program spec yet, have you?

        The tech stuff is easy. They just want the program to do everything _and_ the kitchen sink.

        But what really causes weeks or months of meetings is

        - "should the logo in the corner be exactly 120 pixels or 121 pixels?... no, wait, 119 pixels is just right."

        - Then the fonts which _must_ be 7 pixel Sevenet (or some other non-standard font which is guaranteed not to even be installed on someone's computer, when they point their browser at the site. Bonus points if it's a pain to read.)

        - And it all _must_ comply with some nighmarish corporate scheme that wasn't designed for the net to start with. Actual examples from actual projects I've worked on, include cyan on blue, and light orange on orange-ish yellow. Literally. I'm not making it up.

        - And all the text _must_ always be limited into a 491 pixel wide area, to look the same on everyone's screen as it does on the PHB's laptop, with whatever default non-maximized position his IE remained set as. (God forbid that someone who uses 1600x1200 be actually able to use all that area to read the text.)

        And so on and so forth. It's the stuff managers' dreams are made of. I'm guessing that if you stopped them from spending weeks debating the exact font size and exact logo size and hue, you'd suck all the fun out of management.

        So, well, given that the government's job _is_ to manage... now why am I not surprised? ;)
    • It's a jobs program, to help out all of the unemployed fontographers, put out of work by the dot-com bust.
    • Instead of actually doing something useful, they sit around and argue over the right font to use.

      Yeah, imagine making sure everyone is using a standard font people can read so they can be assured that people will have it on their computer and can view the documents properly!
    • by Just Some Guy ( 3352 ) <kirk+slashdot@strauser.com> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:43AM (#8169232) Homepage Journal
      The government uses a lot of OCR - more than you would believe. Standardizing on one exact font description makes it far easier to build an OCR engine optimized for speed and accuracy, which in turn saves time and taxpayer dollars. It doesn't seem that unreasonable.
      • by k98sven ( 324383 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:50AM (#8169341) Journal
        The government uses a lot of OCR - more than you would believe. Standardizing on one exact font description makes it far easier to build an OCR engine optimized for speed and accuracy, which in turn saves time and taxpayer dollars.

        Wait a second.. are you saying that the government is spending lots of time OCRing their own computer documents??

        Now that is a waste of time and money!
        • by Just Some Guy ( 3352 ) <kirk+slashdot@strauser.com> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:07PM (#8169562) Homepage Journal
          I agree with you in principle, but you have to understand that the one thing the US government is tremendously experienced with is moving around massive volumes of paper. They've spent 200 years building a huge infrastructure around the idea of paper trails.

          Now, in the last 10-15 years it's become reasonable to use electronic means to move around large amounts of data between normal sites - that is, those not custom-built around mainframe systems like the original ARPAnet. The government seems to be making strides toward adapting to the new technology, but you have to understand that those giant traditional paper distribution networks can't just be replaced overnight. I'm sure that there are a lot of instances where, at this exact moment in time, it's actually cheaper and more efficient for office "A" to transmit information to office "B" using paper as a carrier medium.

          Remember, "Rome" wasn't built in a day (Heh! An on-topic pun! Ain't I the clever one?). It'll take a while to remodel it to suit the current technology.


          • The government seems to be making strides toward adapting to the new technology

            I'm sure.

            If they're like most corporations in the United States, they'll adopt some official records retention policy that prescribes periodic deletion of old emails and electronic documents.

            The Netscape trial illustrated Microsoft's mistake in keeping old emails around.

            Monica Lewinsky's old emails likewise proved to be an embarrassment for the administration.

            And given Dick Cheney's penchant for secrecy, I'm sure that a lo

      • by lobsterGun ( 415085 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:52AM (#8169370)
        When I was in the military we were required to use a font called OCR-A. It was optimised for the OCR readers they had at the time (the late 80's early 90's). I was nearly 100% accurate when OCR'd - pretty good when you consider that we were OCRing text that was being produced by typewriters that had been in near constant use for 20 years.

        You can see an example of OCR-a it here [identifont.com].

        • When my dad was in the Navy there was a cost-cutting initiative to reduce wasted paper. Somebody noticed that there was a lot of blank space around the edges of typed text and decided that the best way to reduce these margins was to use 8 x 10 1/2 inch paper.

          It was abandoned when they figured out the special sized paper was more expensive. My dad still has a ream of the stuff.
    • by kippy ( 416183 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:43AM (#8169241)
      This was a memo, not a $3 million case study. Don't overreact just because it has to do with the government. I'll bet you anything this cost about an hour of someone's time and the cost of emailing their workers and handing out some paper copies.

      If you want to start bitching about where your tax money is going, do some research [whitehouse.gov] first.
    • by pointbeing ( 701902 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:45AM (#8169261)
      I work for the federal government. Since not every federal employee can be trusted not to use a magenta scribble font for official correspondence, there needs to be a standard.

      Sad, but true.

      Also, most large corporations have a standard font for official correspondence.

    • Fonts Matter (Score:3, Interesting)

      by yintercept ( 517362 )
      Font selection and standardization is a big deal. People read through the process of pattern recognition. Using standard fonts substantially increases the speed at which people read and their comprehension of what they read.

      Times New Roman is not a Microsoft v. the world thing. The font was developed by The Times in 1932 [wikipedia.org]. It is a relatively compact font. It was used by papers as they were able to get a large number of words per page and was easy to read.

      A standardized font improves quality. It makes do
    • There is nothing absurd about setting documentation standards. Half of all policies and procedures sound silly until you imagine an organization running without them. Suddenly your legislation turns up on perfumed pink antique laid with MS Script type instead of Times Roman on white bond.
  • 14 point? (Score:5, Interesting)

    by ed.han ( 444783 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:37AM (#8169134) Journal
    why so big? isn't 10 the default standard for most written communication?

    ed
    • by SILIZIUMM ( 241333 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:40AM (#8169184) Homepage
      Old guys don't see very well anymore.
    • by MarkGriz ( 520778 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:53AM (#8169379)
      "Re:14 point? why so big? isn't 10 the default standard for most written communication?"

      Most likely aggressive lobbying by the pulp and paper industry.
    • 10 Point Falisy (Score:5, Informative)

      by Genady ( 27988 ) <[moc.cam] [ta] [sregor.yrag]> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:04PM (#8169511)
      See here's the problem. 10 point at 96 DPI and 10 point at 72 DPI *SHOULD* be the same thing, point does *NOT* equal pixel, that's a common fallicy propogated by Microsoft. Points are Points, there are 72 of them in an inch. Points are NOT pixels!

      So to answer your question. No, 12 point is the accepted standard for most communication. Unfortunately since the majority of computers in the world render points incorrectly '10 point' has become a defacto, and typographically incorrect, standard.
      • Re:10 Point Falisy (Score:3, Interesting)

        by spitzak ( 4019 )
        This is not Microsoft's problem. If you did the minor detail of checking you would see that the Win32 API for selecting a font size takes the size in *points*. The same call takes a negative number to indicate pixels, which appears to be an addition at the last minute in an attempt to allow the DPI to change, but that appears to not have worked due to too many programs using the point interface.

        It is true they assumme the screen is 96 dpi so they multiply this by 96/72 to get the number of pixels. There is
    • by jsebrech ( 525647 )
      why so big? isn't 10 the default standard for most written communication?

      I find it kind of ironic that the only people using times new roman 14 will be government employees and high school students trying to fill at least two pages with text.
  • Slow news day? (Score:4, Insightful)

    by prisoner-of-enigma ( 535770 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:37AM (#8169136) Homepage
    Not to be petty or anything, but just how slow of a news day does it have to be when a font change is considered newsworthy?
  • by adamvjackson ( 607836 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:38AM (#8169147)
    I would think Verdana or Tahoma would be a much better solution. Times New Roman is SOOO Windows 3.1! :)
    • by Ilgaz ( 86384 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:46AM (#8169287) Homepage
      Verdana and Tahoma are screen fonts. Georgia, Times, Arial are print fonts.
    • Sorry, but not true. Both Verdan and Tahoma are sans serif [webopedia.com] fonts, whereas Times New Roman is a serif [webopedia.com] font. A very common guideline for readability is that body text should use a serif font; sans serif fonts are better for titles.
    • You're all missing the point here - Linux as I see it doesn't have the exact font "Times New Roman" as part of the default install - (at least OpenOffice 1.1 on Fedora Core 1 shows now Times Roman font...)

      So, what does this edict from the government mean for Linux desktop adoption in the Government?
  • by jxs2151 ( 554138 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:38AM (#8169151) Homepage
    "...are moving to a new standard font: 'Times New Roman..."

    How appropriate since we are apparently the New Rome .

  • by ArcticPuppy ( 592282 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:39AM (#8169155) Journal
    The word "Oil" is often misintepreted as "Weapons of Mass Destruction" when written in Courier New 12.
  • Copyright? (Score:3, Interesting)

    by Anonymous Coward on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:39AM (#8169160)
    Who owns the copyright to Times New Roman? Are there any licensing issues involved in this decision?
    • Re:Copyright? (Score:5, Informative)

      by WillAdams ( 45638 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:02PM (#8169496) Homepage
      Times New Roman is owned by Monotype Corporation.

      There's a ``gentleman's agreement'' w/ Linotype Corporation which allows them to use / produce ``Times'' (For the backstory on this, look up an article published in the APHA's journal and Walter Tracy's wonderful book _Letters of Credit_).

      However, URW did a clone of Times (Nimbus Serif, I believe it's provided as), which they've since made freely available (see the link to this at www.tug.org) and which can be easily used in free systems such as TeX, and is readily installable w/ XFree86 so that one may use it w/ Linux, Gnome, KDE &c.

      For those who're curious on the specifics of typeface copyright &c., www.typeright.org is a good starting point.

      William
  • Interesting... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by CrazyTalk ( 662055 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:39AM (#8169176)
    That they are going from a fixed-width font (courier) to a variable-width font (Times). Columns of numbers, etc. won't line up as nice with Times, especially if the people creating the documents don't know what they are doing.
    • Re:Interesting... (Score:5, Insightful)

      by mysticgoat ( 582871 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:47PM (#8170145) Homepage Journal

      Yeah, the change from fixed to proportional strikes me as the significant thing.

      It means that government employees who have to use a word processor are now going to have to learn how to do tab stops. And (Horrors!) maybe even tables. Many of these astute public servants-- secretaries to heads of departments and so forth-- have been abusing the spacebar for 10+ years.

      This is going to disrupt the work of a lot of staff. They'll be spending their time learning about left justified tabs, right justified tabs, and the strange behaviors of the mysterious decimal point tab. And some will be forced to learn how to insert rows and columns in tables, and even perhaps how to merge adjacent cells in a table. This is going to be very stressfull in some areas, and will cause some early retirements and probably some medical retirements. I ain't kidding. I've worked with a goodly cross section of these astute public servants, and I know about the limitations that are behind the bright smiles.

      The March Monthly Report On The SW Antarctic Penguin Census And Pollen Count will have to be rewritten from scratch rather than simply copying last month's file and changing the numbers. All businesses that rely on such reports from the US State Department should be advised that these may be late, due to unexpected technical problems with the computers.

      Noted in passing: IIRC, both Courier New and Times New Roman were introduced at the same time, as two of the three core fonts of TrueType, about 1991, as part of Widows 3.1 (maybe another geezer can confirm this). Both are native Windows fonts. (The third core font was Arial.)

      There is nothing particularly newer or more modern about TNR vs CN. Both are computer implementations of fonts that were developed to meet limitations of earlier technologies. Courier is a very open font that does not gum up quickly on the electric typewriters of the 1960s. Times is a complex font designed to retain readability at small sizes with newsprint stock and linotype machines, where smearing, dropouts, and voids frequently damaged the letterforms.

      It is always good to see that the US government is improving itself, and moving ahead with the Times.
      </rant>

  • by burgburgburg ( 574866 ) <splisken06@email . c om> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:40AM (#8169182)
    Of course, in it's efforts to create it's counterfeit kingdom here on earth, the Beast has given further evidence of his attempt to reconstitute the Holy Roman Empire, using the Times New Roman font.

    No wonder the 5 evil acolytes selected him.

  • Telegrams? (Score:5, Funny)

    by illuminatedwax ( 537131 ) <stdrange.alumni@uchicago@edu> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:40AM (#8169187) Journal
    There are only three exceptions to the draconian new typographical rules: telegrams

    Telegrams?! They still use telegrams? If so, where can I still send one from? I'm sure a telegram to a Senator might get more attention than a letter and certainly more than an email. Plus sending telegrams sounds cool.

    --Stephen

  • by jghiloni ( 697980 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:41AM (#8169203)
    In related news, the US Government changes the official resolution of all desktops to 640x480, 256 colors.
  • Language? (Score:3, Insightful)

    by DaHat ( 247651 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:41AM (#8169208) Homepage
    and yet we still do not have an official language!
  • More Modern (Score:5, Informative)

    by pete-classic ( 75983 ) <hutnick@gmail.com> on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:43AM (#8169228) Homepage Journal
    From the article: "a 'more modern' font."

    I'm sure glad they put "more modern" in quotes, as Times New Roman was introduced in 1932 [comfsm.fm]!

    -Peter
    • Re:More Modern (Score:3, Informative)

      by tbmaddux ( 145207 ) *

      'm sure glad they put "more modern" in quotes, a Times New Roman was introduced in 1932! [comfsm.fm]

      Also, from the same page, Courier was first designed as an IBM typewriter face. IBM started as Computing-Tabulating-Recording-Company in 1911 and its name was changed to IBM in 1924. So it is possible that Courier predates Times New Roman. However, Adrian Frutiger [artandculture.com] redrew that font for IBM selectric typewriters, [ibm.com] thus creating Courier New in 1961.

  • Its a shame.. (Score:5, Insightful)

    by naelurec ( 552384 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:46AM (#8169282) Homepage
    They should have used an open license font like Bitstream Vera [bitstream.com]. This would have given them the fixed spaced "Bitstream Vera Sans Mono" for tabular data, "Bitstream Vera Serif" for paragraph and "Bitstream Vera Sans" for headers, captions, etc. Simply beautiful and open. :)
  • by Quila ( 201335 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:54AM (#8169401)
    They chose the Times New Roman typeface at 14 point, consisting of the fonts regular, italic, bold and bold italic.

    A typeface could technically be a font if you only have one version of that typeface = the one font in it.
  • by fuzzybunny ( 112938 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @11:59AM (#8169447) Homepage Journal
    ...the department of homeland security recently adopted Zapf Dingbats [fonts-free.com] as its official font.

    Should clear up their communiques a bit.
  • by stuffduff ( 681819 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:05PM (#8169530) Journal
    George W. Bush is expected to announce shortly the Timber Reclamation Act of 2004 in which all wood framed houses will be demolished and the lumber reclaimed and recycled to produce "Goverment Bond" in an effort to avoid a predicted paper shortfall for government documents.

    "I want to make it perfectly clear to every one in the world that just because I'm shortsighted does not mean that I can afford not to be misudnerstood."

  • by azaris ( 699901 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:08PM (#8169568) Journal
    No more ASCII art in official US government memos.
  • by hoggoth ( 414195 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:25PM (#8169834) Journal
    Today the U.S. Government has issued these equally important directives:

    1) All federal employees must tie their shoelaces using a right-over-left Ian knot [fieggen.com].

    2) Handwritten ampersands must be of the official '&' variety and not the 'sloppy plus' variety.

    3) Toilet paper must be folded, not crumpled [monzy.com].

  • by haggar ( 72771 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:30PM (#8169910) Homepage Journal
    (and before I get trolled: no, I can't correct it with glasses)

    I have had problems reading small font text for at least 10 years now, and the problem is, of course, getting worse. But I have learned a lot, about the needs of visually impaired people. One of these things is that Verdana is probably the ideal font for us. This fact was discussed in depth on the nystagmus newsgroup, and the good thing is, we all reached a consensus about Verdana.

    I am surprised so few companies use it. Actually, none as far as I know. I am surprised mostly because I believe that a nice, readable font is pleasant even for the healthy eye, it's more ergonomic.
    • Verdana is a great face [wikipedia.org], esp. for use on-screen, as it was designed for that use by Matthew Carter in 1996. I am not a fan of it in print, because so many other great, easily-accessible faces are already available that are so similar. Take Franklin Gothic [adobe.com], for example.

      For lots of text-on-paper reading, serifed faces are easier on the eyes, so I can see the arguement for Times. Times, though, was intended for newspaper use (hence the name), not long reports that run in wide columns...AS I've said elsewh

  • blind gov't (Score:3, Funny)

    by oohp ( 657224 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:32PM (#8169934) Homepage
    I always said governments were blind and this futher proves it. I could read Times New Roman 14 from space.
  • Readability? (Score:3, Informative)

    by julesh ( 229690 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @12:39PM (#8170038)
    I find this interesting.

    Ask anyone in the publishing industry, and chances are they will tell you that the most readable font available is Courier (in any standard variety) 12pt Regular.

    I.e., precisely the font they are moving away from, on the grounds of readability.

    I wonder if the person who made this choice is someone who has to read a lot of documents, or just somebody who thinks a proportional font looks nicer?
  • Fresh off Google (Score:3, Informative)

    by akruppa ( 300316 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @01:26PM (#8170694) Homepage
    Nice history on Times Roman and Times New Roman here [demon.co.uk]

    Alex
  • "US bans time-honored typeface"

    What the heck?

    1: The memo only applies to standardizing internal documentation for one department.

    2: Courier is "time-honored" only in that it was the ubiquitous typeface for single-font devices like typewriters and ascii printers, as well as degrading nicely to dot matrix. Monospace is a pain to read in extended printed documents.

    3: The article calls the new rules draconian, in spite of the fact that previously, Courier New 12 was mandated for all official documents!
  • by qtp ( 461286 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @02:11PM (#8171355) Journal
    See, it all makes sense now! "New Times Roman".

    "New Times" == "Changing Times" == "New World Order"

    And what kind of "Order"? Roman law, the law of Empire, the end of the Republic, the... the...

    Well, at least they didn't choose Comic Sans. I'd hate to think what kind of world that font would be ushering in.
  • by failedlogic ( 627314 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @02:34PM (#8171677)
    Too justify their jobs and the amount of work they do, beaurocrats can probably increase the font to 15 point without much notice. This makes the document longer, ensuring job security by showing how much work they do. Consultants, pay attention here! You can make more money, with less work.

    What high school, college or university student hasn't heard of this trick before?
  • by kaltkalt ( 620110 ) on Tuesday February 03, 2004 @07:07PM (#8174988)
    An administrative office in the US gov't decided to use a different font. Not only is this not news, but for them to frame it as "US Bans old font" is downright misleading and dispicable. Pretty much every office I've ever worked for has had a standard font. The Dept. of State decided to change fonts--and to a much more eye-pleasing one, I might add. Nobody is going to jail for using Courier Font in the USA. Not even a fine. This is basically just a "TPS Report" saying how they're gonna do the cover sheets from now on... new font. No big fucking deal. The USA has not banned any fonts. If you work for the Dept of State, start using Times new Roman. Shoulda been using it years ago anyway. Of course, if the title of the story had been "State Department Chooses New Font" the editors would have laughed the reporter out of the office... so it had to be more dramatic. "US bans..." ... yeh we've banned lots of stupid things that shouldn't be banned, but fonts are not yet one of them.

Just go with the flow control, roll with the crunches, and, when you get a prompt, type like hell.

Working...