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New Auto-Seeding Torrent Server Released 240

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the making-life-easier dept.
ludwigvan968 writes "The University of Texas New Media Initiative in association with Google's Summer of Code program have been working on a project to make sharing files over the internet easier than ever before. Summer of Code intern Evan Wilson just released Project Snakebite, the first fully automatic BitTorrent server. Just as with a normal webserver, you drop files in a folder to share them. Snakebite takes care of generating torrent files and running a tracker and a seeder for each file. Additionally, it builds a user-customizable link page with all of your files. It will even register your Snakebite server with an easy to remember URL for people that can't remember their IP. Snakebite is free and open software and is currently released for Debian. It's fully portable to both Windows and OS X and the developers just need some help packaging it."
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New Auto-Seeding Torrent Server Released

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  • Sharing files is almost a capitcal crime in the U.S.A.
    • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

      When sharing is outlawed only outlaws will share
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by IAR80 (598046)
      If you are suspected of filesharing you should be sent to Guantanamo.
      ----
      http://world4.monstersgame.co.uk/?ac=vid&vid=47010 693 [monstersgame.co.uk]
      • by elrous0 (869638) * on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @09:16AM (#15999152)
        Actually, Guantanamo is soooo passé these days in the intelligence world. It's the detention facility for TOURISTS. There are dozens of much better, more secretive facilities to send them to now where the New York Times and Supreme Court will never find them. Only poseur intelligence agencies still disappear their detainees to Guantanamo.

        -Eric

    • by legoburner (702695) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:59AM (#15998881) Homepage Journal
      BitTorrent as a basic client will never be truely anonymous by virtue of the technology involved. Only by using private VPNs (like The pirate party one [relakks.com] or by using additional software higher up the network stack like Tor [eff.org] can basic anonymity be enabled.
      • higher up the network stack

        Or lower down the network stack if you are not standing on your head
        • by JesseMcDonald (536341) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @09:36AM (#15999238) Homepage

          Only by using private VPNs . . . or by using additional software higher up the network stack like Tor can basic anonymity be enabled.

          Or lower down the network stack if you are not standing on your head

          Actually, since VPNs are in the Network layer (packet-level) and Tor falls somewhere between the Session and Presentation layers (stream-level), Tor is higher in the stack than VPNs:

          • Application Layer (top) [HTTP, FTP, Telnet]
          • Presentation Layer [SSL, TLS]
          • Session Layer [TCP]
          • Transport Layer [TCP, UDP]
          • Network Layer [IP, ICMP, IPsec]
          • Data Link Layer [Ethernet, 802.11, PPP]
          • Physical Layer (bottom) [10BASE-T, 100BASE-TX, 802.11b/g, DSL]
          • oops you are of course correct. Seems I was actually standing on my head when I wrote the grandparent post.
      • by Kjella (173770)
        BitTorrent as a basic client will never be truely anonymous by virtue of the technology involved.

        It never was... instead it's a very simple, effective way to share files. Everything from suprnova to the pirate bay hasn't been about anonymity or secrecy - it's about being doing it in so great numbers the risk is neglible. The users hav been distributed, the link sites and tracker sites not so much. This makes it a lot easier to set up a tracker site, meaning less centralization so they'll have to take down m
      • by hacker (14635)

        Only by using private VPNs (like The pirate party one) or by using additional software higher up the network stack like Tor can basic anonymity be enabled.

        If by "basic anonymity", you mean lack of trusted anonymity or NO anonymity, then we all agree [noreply.org]. It is a pretty simple (and common) matter to become a maliscious Tor node. Google it.

        "So I'm totally anonymous if I use Tor?"
        "No."

      • by Jugalator (259273)
        The Relakks service (which is not a service by the Pirate Party, just endorsed by them) is only "anonymous" until the police comes knocking on their door with a crime that would give a high enough penalty. 2+ year jailtime and they can do any form of traffic analysis on site as they want. The Relakks site also states this in their FAQ, btw. Any form of jailtime penalty and they can request personal information, and it's possible IP addresses are considered that. Perhaps they don't keep logs to spite them, b
    • by Zigg (64962) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @08:10AM (#15998917)

      Actually, enabling people to easily share their own torrents could help promote legitimate use of BT.

      I've been personally involved in several situations where large, legal files needed to be distributed among a small group of people--unfortunately several didn't have the know-how to set up a tracker, and others simply didn't have the time to figure it out. A tool like this could enable every one of us to start it up on our own.

      The one thing that I think it needs to also have is at least minimal security against discoverability--a password on the torrent listing page, for example. Would also be cool if you could control who was using the server, but I gather BT isn't too well-adapted to that requirement? Not sure.

    • Sharing files is almost a capitcal crime in the U.S.A.

      That's really the $1 million question. And it's pretty obviously not, as far as I can tell--a publicly accessible website is not the best way to hide your personal information. All the RIAA or MPAA needs is an IP address to file suit against you; this is like handing it to them on a silver platter. You'll be hard-pressed to claim you "didn't know you were uploading files" when you have a webpage that indexes the copyrighted material you chose to share.

      • Ok, because I'm a moron, the quoted text should read: "But is it anonymous?" and not "Sharing files..." My mistake.
      • by Fordiman (689627)
        Ah, what about sharing ISOs?

        The assumption that anything on P2P is copyrighted is an issue. Deal with it.
    • It's not anonymous, and apparently it never will be. Although it seems like anonymous file sharing would be a straightforward problem to solve, the FreeNet [slashdot.org] project has been working on this for, what, five years now? They have yet to produce anything usable, or even anything approximating usable. Others [sourceforge.net] have [eff.org] tried [gnunet.org] as well, and none has produced anything that can actually be used for actual file sharing. I'd like to help, but at this point, I wouldn't even know where to begin...

  • by thehunger (549253) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:38AM (#15998821)
    With an unattended, fully automatic, open torrent server, how are you going to stop it from being filled with trash (ie. pr0n, infected files, illegal material) etc?
    • Why would remote uploading be enabled by default or even possible?
    • by szembek (948327) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:49AM (#15998853) Homepage
      Who said other users are going to be able to upload files to share? I think allowing all users to add files would be something that you would have to specifically set up in your own configuration if you wanted it. This is just an easier way for a user to share files on their own website using a torrent.
      • by SpacePirate20X6 (935718) <thebroadbandbucc ... om minus herbivo> on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:53AM (#15998866)
        Exactly right. As opposed to maintaining a tracker on a server, and then separately seeding the files, this solves the problem for you, assuming you have sufficient bandwidth and disk space. This essentially combines the best of direct downloading and distributed downloading; ensuring content is always available, while minimizing the bandwidth used to distribute the content.
        • by inKubus (199753)
          apached module anyone? I could just see it now:
          <?php
           
          torrent_link("/files/file1.mpg", "This is File 1.");
           
          ?>
          You just stick the files you want in some dir, maybe have a little admin script to upload new files and manage your seeding, mysql table that has a list of the torrent info, torrent_link generates the .torrent file and an a href and you're good to go.

    • A moderation system? Using the 'file' magic to determine and block file types? Virus detection software? Dedicated team of administrators?
      I dont think there is a silver bullet answer, but a combination of the above would be fairly effective.
  • Source (Score:5, Interesting)

    by baadger (764884) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:40AM (#15998826)
    For those wondering where the source code is (the website isnt really your typical open source project breed), this app is written in Python. Something quite interesting the article failed to mention.
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by painQuin (626852)
      It seems that Python is the language of BitTorrent...
    • by nkh (750837)
      But they fail to mention where to download those files/app/source code for those who don't use Debian and here is the url: http://sourceforge.net/projects/tristero/ [sourceforge.net]
  • I guess this might be good for people who want to distribute legal products through a torrent. I've used bit torrent, but only for leeching. It just doesn't seem like enough people are setting up their own torrent servers to make this software that worth while.
    • by griffjon (14945)
      That's kinda a chicken-and-egg argument; people aren't setting up BT servers on their own, therefore we don't need software to make it easy? If something's overly complicated, people will do it less. This lowers the barriers to setting up your own tracker. Now, hosting your own tracker on your website or personal system is not something you want to do in the current situation with RIAA and MPAA - if you're sharing music/movies/etc. - but if you're sharing things, like, say, your remastered Knoppix projec
  • by LiquidCoooled (634315) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:50AM (#15998856) Homepage Journal
    How long until people start seeding "Inbox.dbx" or "Outlook.pst" and other fun files we all remember from p2p days?
  • Look out Google (Score:5, Interesting)

    by Goodgerster (904325) <goodgerster@@@gmail...com> on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @07:53AM (#15998865)
    Next case: RIAA versus Google; Google is accused of funding piracy
    Next case: Google versus the United Kingdom; Google is accused of funding the manufacture of items useful to terrorism (as the Federation Against Copyright Theft tells us, piracy funds terrorism)
    Next case: RIAA versus Canonical; Canonical is accused of supplying Azureus, a piracy tool, to people
    Next case: RIAA versus GNOME Foundation; the GNOME Foundation is accused of supplying a GUI library to piracy tools

    WHEN DOES IT END?

    • by hcob$ (766699)

      Next case: RIAA versus Google; Google is accused of funding piracy
      Next case: Google versus the United Kingdom; Google is accused of funding the manufacture of items useful to terrorism (as the Federation Against Copyright Theft tells us, piracy funds terrorism)
      Next case: RIAA versus Canonical; Canonical is accused of supplying Azureus, a piracy tool, to people
      Next case: RIAA versus GNOME Foundation; the GNOME Foundation is accused of supplying a GUI library to piracy tools

      WHEN DOES IT END?

      Right abo

    • by Columcille (88542) *
      It probably ends when we stop inventing lawsuits that haven't happened/won't happen.
  • by BrynM (217883) * on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @08:32AM (#15999002) Homepage Journal
    Despite the posts trying to paint this into the next Napster/Limewire/P2P, I think it would be great for distributing large files that might get slashdotted/dug/whatever. I think it's a good way to have a sudden rush of trafic pay for it's own bandwidth. Sure, not everyone is at risk of a slashdotting, but it makes a good precaution. Since it's just some Python, I bet there wouldn't be too much trouble getting it up in a hury as the server starts to get hit (if you're lucky enough to notice). A bonus of planning ahead is that there's always at least one seed (the server) transferring at about the same rate a normal download would have for a single user in the first place. Scalable content rather than scalable servers. Interesting...
    • This would however require some changes to browsers and the HTTP protocol. Because first having to download a site with bittorrent to your computer and then opening it with a browser sounds like a good way to get rid of 99% of your visitors.
    • by inKubus (199753)
      Yeah, I see what you're getting at. Objectify content (like is already is, as a .html file or whatever) but instead of using HTTP to transfer it, you use the torrent protocol (or whatever's faster). The problem is that .torrent takes a few minutes to get a list of everyone, then you have to wait for slots to open up. Once it gets going it rocks though (hence the "torrent"). Maybe the protocol could reoptomize itself on the fly, just like the old ZModem days, where it chooses a block (frame, whatever) si
  • by ajs (35943) <ajs&ajs,com> on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @08:49AM (#15999058) Homepage Journal
    The more Bittorrent adds features, the more it becomes like gnutella. Fortunately, I have been able to just use Gnutella for the last couple of years ;-)

    Bittorrent is great for very large, very popular files, but when you start dealing with small or unpopular files, I've never found an example where BT got me what I needed faster. Searching Gnutella takes longer than searching for a torrent on the Web, of course, but in the end, download times on very large files that aren't well seeded is radically different, mostly because of the larger chunk size and contingous second-block fetch in Gnutella.
  • I will definitely use this myself. I have some large video files that I want to occasionally want to backup from one computer to another. Home movies and stuff like that. Between the problems in filesystems (what filesystem has full read/write support on Linux, Win2K, and OS X?) and size, this is the best way for me to transfer files.

    Though a nice tutorial on setting up a vpn among computers with dynamic IP addresses (I don't have a static IP) would be appreciated.
    • by gozar (39392)
      Though a nice tutorial on setting up a vpn among computers with dynamic IP addresses (I don't have a static IP) would be appreciated.

      Check out Hamachi [hamachi.cc]. Once you setup a network in hamachi, every machine gets a nice static ip address.

    • Re: (Score:2, Informative)

      Maybe you don't understand the Bittorrent principal - it's quite inefficient to use as a 1-1 transfer, and only pays off as the number of clients increase. There are much better solutions for backing up large files between 2 machines.
    • by inKubus (199753)
      Though a nice tutorial on setting up a vpn among computers with dynamic IP addresses (I don't have a static IP) would be appreciated.

      Try Hamachi [hamachi.cc]. It works flawlessly and your IP on the VPN is determined by your login, not your actual IP. So as long as you're running it, you'll have the same IP on the VPN, regardless of the current state of your real connection. You install it, run it, choose a network name and password and that's about it. They have a central server that handles keeping a list of everyo
  • by friedmud (512466) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @09:19AM (#15999166)
    I've been thinking about setting up my own tracker to allow my family to download home videos from me...

    I know that sites like YouTube are popular right now... but I really don't like the quality restrictions... and would rather family members could just download a nice sized full copy themselves so they could burn it to DVD if they like or whatever.

    Bittorrent would be ideal for doing this... and this software sounds like just the ticket. All I would have to do is point my family at the page it generates... and when I finish editing a home movie drop it in the "upload" folder and wham... it goes out to everyone.

    All it needs now is an "auto client" that you just give it the URL of the automatically created website and it will automatically download anything new that arrives (that's a lot of "auto" going on ;-) That way I could go around to all of my families computers and set them up with the software and then just leave it alone. Every once in a while they can look in the "Home Videos" folder for new videos....

    I think it's funny that people around here always cry "Bittorrent doesn't have to be for illegal purposes" and then any time a bittorrent story comes up all they can do is argue the finer points of what would/wouldn't be illegal/enforceable if you use the new tech... sigh.

    Friedmud
  • While it's great that the authors created an apt-get repository for easy Debian installs, be warned that the packages don't work with Debian Sarge/Stable. (The packages conflict with Debian Sarge/Stable's Python packages.)
  • by hacker (14635) <hacker@gnu-designs.com> on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @09:41AM (#15999268)

    Oops! Another case of not testing your software before you release it.

    # dpkg -i snakebite-rc3.deb
    Selecting previously deselected package snakebite.
    (Reading database ... 100410 files and directories currently installed.)
    Unpacking snakebite (from snakebite-rc3.deb) ...
    Setting up snakebite (1.1) ...
    Adding system startup for /etc/init.d/snakebite ...
    /etc/rc0.d/K20snakebite -> ../init.d/snakebite
    ...
    aphrodite:/tmp# /etc/init.d/snakebite start
    Starting Snakebite...Traceback (most recent call last):
    File "/usr/bin/snakebite", line 16, in ?
    from BitTorrent.defaultargs import get_defaults
    ImportError: No module named defaultargs
    .
  • The days of free-flowing porn, put up by bunches of amateurs with no web design experience, and not a pay site in sight!
  • by Daath (225404)
    How about that [slashdot.org] :)
  • Second? (Score:4, Informative)

    by AnotherBlackHat (265897) on Tuesday August 29, 2006 @11:50AM (#16000245) Homepage
    The first fully automatic BitTorrent server.

    I thought he.net had the first fully automatic [he.net] BitTorrent server [slashdot.org]
    .

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