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Submission + - Matt Taibbi: 'Washington Post' 'Blacklist' Story Is Shameful and Disgusting (rollingstone.com)

MyFirstNameIsPaul writes: From the article:

Most high school papers wouldn't touch sources like these. But in November 2016, both the president-elect of the United States and the Washington Post are equally at ease with this sort of sourcing.

Even worse, the Post apparently never contacted any of the outlets on the "list" before they ran their story. Yves Smith at Naked Capitalism says she was never contacted. Chris Hedges of Truthdig, who was part of a group that won the Pulitzer Prize for The New York Times once upon a time, said the same. "We were named," he tells me. "I was not contacted."

Hedges says the Post piece was an "updated form of Red-Baiting."

"This attack signals an open war on the independent press," he says. "Those who do not spew the official line will be increasingly demonized in corporate echo chambers such as the Post or CNN as useful idiots or fifth columnists."


Submission + - UK government's latest deluded idea: 'banning' underage sexting on social media (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: When the UK government is not busy looking for ways to invade internet users' privacy, it's looking for ways to restrict what they are able to do online — particularly when it comes to things of a sexual nature.

The health secretary Jeremy Hunt has made calls for technology companies and social media to do more to tackle the problems of cyberbullying, online intimidation and — rather specifically — under-18-year-olds texting sexually explicit images. Of course, he doesn't have the slightest idea about how to go about tackling these problems, but he has expressed his concern so that, in conjunction with passing this buck to tech companies, should be enough, right?

Submission + - Furious Kaspersky is 'disappointed and dismayed' with Microsoft (betanews.com)

Mark Wilson writes: Claims of anti-competitive behavior are incredibly common in the world of tech; Google finds itself on the defensive on just about a weekly basis. Microsoft is certainly no stranger to accusations of anti-competitiveness, most notably for bundling Internet Explorer in older versions of Windows. But now it's Microsoft's approach to security that's in the firing line.

Eugene Kaspersky (yes, that one: the Russian security expert and CEO of Kaspersky Lab) has fired a vitriolic tirade at Microsoft in which he complains about how Windows Defender works in Windows 10. Windows 10 has been lambasted for many reasons since it launched, and things are not really improving as we near the launch of Windows 10 Creators Update. Kaspersky is so furious about the way in which Defender operates that he has written a lengthy and bitter blog post entitled: "That's It. I've Had Enough!"

Submission + - Would redundancy and really long TTL have countered a lot of DDOS effects? (medium.com) 1

marmot7 writes: My primary takeaways from this article was that it's important to have redundancy (additional NS's) and that it's important to have a very long TTL when you're not actively updating something. Would the measures in this article have at least limited the damage of these attacks? The long TTL change alone would have made the cache likely covered the entire attack, right?

Submission + - Prominent Pro-Patent Judge Issues Opinion Declaring All Software Patents Bad (techdirt.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A lawsuit brought by the world's largest patent troll, Intellectual Ventures, and handled on appeal (as are all patent cases), by the notoriously awful Court of Appeals for the Federal Circuit (CAFC) may have actually killed off software patents. The ruling came from a judge that has ruled over patent cases since the 1980s, and it appears he's been born again into the anti-software patent world.

Judge Mayer pointed out that the First Amendment says that "some" patents should not be allowed. The whole concurrence is worth reading, starting with the First Amendment argument — which is kind of fascinating in that it goes well beyond what most people had talked about in the past concerning software patents. Important ruling decisions highlighted in the source.

Submission + - SPAM: Hofstra university posts a "trigger warning" sign for the presidential debate 2

mi writes: Hofstra University, which hosts the first presidential debate of 2016, has posted a “trigger warning” sign to warn students about the potentially disturbing content that may be discussed during the night:

Trigger Warning: The event conducted just beyond this sign may contain triggering and/or sensitive material. Sexual violence, sexual assault, and abuse are some topics mentioned within this event. If you feel triggered, please know there are resources to help you.”

Should people triggered by anything, which the candidates may mention, even vote?
Link to Original Source

Submission + - mechanics of the rejection of science (theguardian.com) 2

Layzej writes: Science strives for coherence. For example, the findings from climate science form a highly coherent body of knowledge that is supported by many independent lines of evidence. Those who reject climate science often rely on several mutually contradictory ideas. Hence, claims that the globe “is cooling” can coexist with claims that the “observed warming is natural” and that “the human influence does not matter because warming is good for us.” A recent study examines this behavior at the aggregate level, but gives many examples where contradictory ideas are held by the same individual, and sometimes are presented within a single publication.

The common denominator among contrarian positions is the conviction that climate change either does not exist or is not human caused, and that either way it does not present a risk (or if it does, then adaptation will deal with the problem). In a nutshell, the opposition to GHG emission cuts is the unifying and coherent position underlying all manifestations of climate science denial. Climate science denial is therefore perhaps best understood as a rational activity that replaces a coherent body of science with an incoherent and conspiracist body of pseudo-science for political reasons and with considerable political coherence and effectiveness.

Submission + - The Downsides of Google's Chrome Security Push (vortex.com)

Lauren Weinstein writes: While the push to encrypt Internet connections by default is a laudable one, it is also essential that fundamental aspects of practicality and user reactions also be carefully considered.

I touched on some of this over a year ago in “Falling Into the Encryption Trap” — but now that Google has made more explicit their plans for browser address bar warnings to users regarding http: connections, I’m again concerned.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Science and Tech Activities for Middle School Girls

An anonymous reader writes: The only Science and Technology Badge for Girl Scout Cadettes (Grades 6 -8) is called "The Science of Happiness" (http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/home/badgeexplorer/#science-of-happiness) and their Healthy Living Badge is called "Eating for Beauty" (http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/home/badgeexplorer/#eating-for-beauty). Does the Slashdot community have any suggestions for real activities for this age group?

Submission + - The Epi-Pen price battle hits Congress (cnn.com) 2

Applehu Akbar writes: The recent exorbitant increase in the price of the Epi-Pen injector for epinephrine, a compound that has been generic for years, has now turned into civil war in the US Senate. One senator's daughter relies on Epi-Pen, while another senator's daughter is CEO of Mylan, the single company that is licensed to sell these injectors in the US.

On the worldwide market there is no monopoly on these devices. Manufacturers include Amedra Pharmaceuticals LLC, ALK Abello, Sanofi SA, and Lincoln Medical Ltd, Itelliject Inc, Adamis Pharmaceuticals Corp, Hospira Inc, Teva Pharmaceuticals Ltd and Antares Pharma Inc. Is it finally time to allow Americans to go online and fill their prescriptions on the world market?

Submission + - The coral die-off crisis is a climate crime and Exxon fired the gun (theguardian.com) 1

mspohr writes: An article published by Bill McKibben in The Guardian points the finger at Exxon for spreading climate change denial which led to lack of action to prevent widespread coral die-off.
"We know the biggest culprits now, because great detective work by investigative journalists has uncovered key facts in the past year. The world’s biggest oil company, Exxon, knew everything there was to know about climate change by the late 1970s and early 1980s. Its scientists understood how much and how fast it was going to warm, and how much damage that was going to do. And the company knew the scientists were right: that’s why they started “climate-proofing” their own installations, for instance building their drilling rigs to accommodate the sea level rise they knew was coming.

What they didn’t do was tell the rest of us. Instead, they – and many other players in the fossil fuel industry – bankrolled the rise of the climate denial industry, helping fund the “thinktanks” and front groups that spent the last generation propagating the phoney idea that there was a deep debate about the reality of global warming. As a result, we’ve wasted a quarter century in a phoney argument about whether the climate was changing."

Submission + - 10 Year-Old Teaches Hackers a Valuable Lesson In Privacy (csoonline.com)

itwbennett writes: At r00tz Asylum, a kids-only gathering at DEF CON, 10-year-old Evan Robertson presented his first-place winning school science fair project, which showed how quickly people will hand over their privacy for a little free Wi-Fi. Robertson set up a Wi-Fi hotspot with terms-of-service that would allow him to access or modify connecting devices 'in any way.' In his science fair experiment, 76 people at local malls and stores connected to his hotspot, and 40 of them (52%) accepted the TOS to gain access. And, proving that security pros aren't all quite as privacy-minded as you might expect them to be, Robertson later set up his hotspot at BSides San Antonio, where 41 people connected to his hotspot, and 20 of them accepted the TOS.

Submission + - Is Cortana spying on us? 2

siamesevodka writes: I just got the anniversary update installed [windows 10] and noticed cortana is installed again.I seen it was active again and wondered why. So I remembered it was hard for me uninstall or shut off the last time. So I asked cortana how to uninstall it. It replied that the anniversary update made sure it was permanently installed. So does this thing spy on us now even if we don't use it? Is it a back door for the NSA to keep tabs on me? Is microsoft whoring me out with their "free" software ? Is there a way to still shut it completely off or is George Orwell right?

Submission + - Industry Pushes Foreign Labor, Claiming 'U.S. Students Can't Hack It in Tech' (breitbart.com)

geek writes: According to Caroline May "The tech industry is seeking to bolster its argument for more white-collar foreign tech workers with the insulting claim that the education system is insufficiently preparing Americans for tech fields, according to pro-American worker attorneys with the Immigration Reform Law Institute."

"But if the H-1B program really is meant to correct the failings of our education system, as BigTech’s new messaging-push implies, why is it importing so many people from India? According to results from the Programme for International Student Assessment (PISA), a global standardized math and science assessment sponsored by the OECD, India scored almost dead last among the 74 countries tested. The results were apparently so embarrassing, the country pulled out of the program all together. Not surprisingly then, there isn’t a single Indian university that appears within the top 250 spots of the World University Rankings Survey. And unlike American bachelor’s degrees, obtaining a bachelor’s in India takes only three years of study."

Submission + - Frequent password changes are the enemy of security (arstechnica.com)

npslider writes: FTC technologist and former Carnegie Mellon University professor Lorrie Cranor says, "Contrary to what you've been told, frequent [password] changes can be counterproductive".

Common techniques account holders used when they were required to change passwords are to add or change only a single character. Users take their old passwords, they change it in some small way, and they come up with a new password. Many users, faced with the challenge of memorizing a new password every 60 days will write the password down on a sticky note and put it under the keyboard or on the monitor — defeating the purpose of keeping passwords secret in the first place.

A separate study from researchers at Carleton University provided a mathematical demonstration that frequent password changes hamper attackers only minimally and probably not enough to offset the inconvenience to end users.

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