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Comment Re:Microsoft Has An Odd Obsession With The Cloud.. (Score 3, Interesting) 69

And I suspect that Windows as an OS is dying slowly, to be replaced by Android/iOS powered computing devices in the next 5 years. So Microsoft desperately needs a new "Windows" like platform - this time it is the Microsoft Cloud. They are trying desperately to shift all your shit into the Cloud, so you become DEPENDENT on using the Cloud. Once Microsoft has you in the Cloud, they will push SAAS - Software As A Service - on you hard. There won't be any significant "software" sitting on your harddrive anymore. Just little front-end "Apps" - essentially just GUIs - that connect to a cloud server back end. Of course you will have to "rent" those apps just like you have to with Adobe/Autodesk software. This means that you will have to provide things like credit card data to Microsoft, which of course Microsoft will datamine and sell to Big Data companies for a lot of money. Its "1984", just that this time, 1984 happens "in the Cloud".

Comment Microsoft Has An Odd Obsession With The Cloud... (Score 4, Insightful) 69

Yes, I get it. Satya Nadella is from Microsoft's Cloud Division so all things MS/Windows 10 have to go "cloud" now and of course all your dataz haz to bee in ze Maikrozoft Klaud az zoon az pozzible. But here's my question: If Windows 10 as an OS cannot be trusted with very basic Privacy - phoning home all the time and such - why on earth would I put all my Gmails in the Microsoft Cloud? If I cannot trust your OS sitting on my own harddrive, why would I trust your Cloud sitting on your servers somewhere? Can you trust Google more than Microsoft? I don't know the answer to that. All I know is - if Windows 10 isn't private, your Cloud service probably isn't very private either. My 2 Cents.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: How Do You Explain "Don't Improve My Software Syndrome" or DIMSS? 7

dryriver writes: I am someone who likes to post improvement suggestions for different software tools I use on the internet. If I see a function in a software that doesn't work well for me or could work better for everyone else, I immediately post suggestions as to how that function could be improved and made to work better for everybody. A striking phenomenon I have come across in posting such suggestions is the sheer number of "why would you want that at all" or "nobody needs that" or "the software is fine as it is" type responses from software users. What is particularly puzzling is that its not the developers of the software rejecting the suggestions — its users of the software that often react sourly to improvement suggestions that could, if implemented well, benefit a lot of people using the software in question. I have observed this happening online for years even for really good software feature/function improvement ideas that actually wound up being implemented. My question is — what causes this behavior of software users on the internet? Why would a software user see a suggestion that would very likely benefit many other users of the software and object loudly to that suggestion, or even pretend that "the suggestion is a bad one"?

Submission + - Imagination Technologies Previews New 7nm Process Furian GPUs (imgtec.com)

dryriver writes: Imagination Technologies' 28nm process PowerVR GPUs were mostly known for applications like low power mobile gaming (smartphones, tablets) until today. Imagination Technologies has just announced a new GPU architecture named "Furian". Furian GPUs will go as low as 7nm and target 4K 120FPS VR HDR gaming instead of lower end mobile gaming. They will also accelerate ADAS (Advanced Driver Assistance Systems) and Neural Net based realtime computer vision applications. Imagination technologies claims great advances in GFLOPs density, fill rate and gaming performance density — 90% increase over the old Rogue architecture on that last one. Vulkan and OpenVX are supported. Just how powerful the new Furian GPUs will be hasn't been announced yet. Will Furian possibly compete with Nvidia, AMD and Intel GPUs in the PC gaming space?

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: What Are Good Books On Inventing, Innovating And Doing R&D?

dryriver writes: I've signed up to a project that involves inventing new ways to do things and also performing the technology R&D required to make these new ways a reality. So, dear Slashdotters — are there any good books on inventing, innovating or doing R&D? Books that describe different ways to approach inventing/R&D? Books on managing a team effort to invent, innovate and research? Or even good books about the history of past inventions — how they were created, why they were created, how and why the succeeded or failed in the real world? Thanks!

Submission + - There Are 19 Types Of Smile - But Only 6 Are For Happiness (bbc.com)

dryriver writes: The BBC reports: "In 1924, grad student Carney Landis conducted an experiment to see what kinds of smiles exist and what they signify. Landis wanted to know if certain experiences, such as pain or shock, always elicited the same facial expressions. And he was prepared to inflict them in order to find out. He sat his subjects down in comfortable chairs, then painted lines on their faces so that he could better see their grimaces. Over the course of three hours, they were repeatedly photographed while being subjected to a series of bizarre and unpleasant pranks, including placing fireworks under their seats and electrocuting their hands while they felt around in a bucket of slimy frogs. The climax came when he fetched a live white rat on a tray and asked them to cut off its head with a butcher’s knife. Landis’ methods were certainly unethical, but perhaps the most uneasy revelation was what he discovered. Even during the most violent tasks, the most common reaction wasn’t to cry or rage – it was to smile. He wrote: 'So far as this experiment goes I have found no expression other than a smile, which was present in enough photographs to be considered as typical of any situation.' Of 19 different types of smile, only six occur when we’re having a good time. The rest happen when we’re in pain, embarrassed, uncomfortable, horrified or even miserable. A smile may mean contempt, anger or incredulity, that we’re lying or that we’ve lost."

Submission + - The Incentives For Software Firms To Take Security Seriously Are Too Weak (economist.com)

dryriver writes: The Economist reports: "The software industry has for decades disclaimed liability for the harm when its products go wrong. Such an approach has its benefits. Silicon Valley’s fruitful 'go fast and break things' style of innovation is possible only if firms have relatively free rein to put out new products while they still need perfecting. But this point will soon be moot. As computers spread to products covered by established liability arrangements, such as cars or domestic goods, the industry’s disclaimers will increasingly butt up against existing laws. Firms should recognise that, if the courts do not force the liability issue, public opinion will. Many computer-security experts draw comparisons to the American car industry in the 1960s, which had ignored safety for decades. In 1965 Ralph Nader published 'Unsafe at Any Speed', a bestselling book that exposed and excoriated the industry’s lax attitude. The following year the government came down hard with rules on seat belts, headrests and the like. Now imagine the clamour for legislation after the first child fatality involving self-driving cars. Fortunately, the small but growing market in cyber-security insurance offers a way to protect consumers while preserving the computing industry’s ability to innovate. A firm whose products do not work properly, or are repeatedly hacked, will find its premiums rising, prodding it to solve the problem. A firm that takes reasonable steps to make things safe, but which is compromised nevertheless, will have recourse to an insurance payout that will stop it from going bankrupt."

Submission + - Living Near Airports, Aircraft Noise May Increase Your Diabetes 2 Chance By 86% (dailymail.co.uk)

dryriver writes: People who live below an airport flightpath are 86 per cent more likely to have type 2 diabetes than people who live in quieter areas, a new study has found. The findings have led scientists to suggest that aircraft noise, rather than air pollution, could be to blame. The scientists believe the noise from planes overhead has a devastating effect on the body’s metabolism, leading to increased blood sugar levels. The researchers suspect such changes are linked to sleep disruption, and say that people can reduce their exposure to harmful noise levels simply by closing their windows at night. The scientists said that although most flights occur in the day, there could be a knock-on effect on night-time sleep through raised stress levels. Type 2 diabetes – which can lead to heart disease, strokes, limb amputations and blindness – affects more than three million people in the UK. According to the European Commission, more than 700,000 people are currently affected by aircraft noise from London’s Heathrow Airport alone.

Comment Murphy's Law + Moore's Law = Moorephy's Law (Score 1) 106

Moorephy's Law: "If the processing power of a CPU can double every 2 years, it WILL double, and in the worst way possible. You will have a plurality of CPU cores that each want to do their own thing. And your compiler will not be able to get those cores to work with each other properly. If you code in Assembly, of course, things are very different. Your CPU cores WILL eventually learn to talk to each other, but by the time that happens in any meaningful way, you will unfortunately be a patient living in a psychiatric institution." (Moorephy's Law is licensed under the GNU Multi-Core Assembly Programming Brainfuck 3.0 license).

Submission + - Living Near Airports, Aircraft Noise May Increase Your Diabetes 2 Chance By 86% (dailymail.co.uk) 2

dryriver writes: People who live below an airport flightpath are 86 per cent more likely to have type 2 diabetes than people who live in quieter areas, a new study has found. The findings have led scientists to suggest that aircraft noise, rather than air pollution, could be to blame. The scientists believe the noise from planes overhead has a devastating effect on the body’s metabolism, leading to increased blood sugar levels. The researchers suspect such changes are linked to sleep disruption, and say that people can reduce their exposure to harmful noise levels simply by closing their windows at night. The scientists said that, although most flights occur in the day, there could be a knock-on effect on night-time sleep through raised stress levels. According to the European Commission, more than 700,000 people are currently affected by aircraft noise from London’s Heathrow Airport alone. The link was made by a team of scientists at the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute in Basel, who studied more than 2,600 adults in a bid to establish the effects of noise and air pollution.

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