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Comment Greenpeace founders? (Score 1) 84

That's why the original leader/founder left.

Are you talking about Bob Hunter? He left when died of prostate cancer in 2005. Possibly you mean David McTaggart? He left when he died in 2001 of a car accident. Dorothy and Irving Stowe are also both dead and supported Greenpeace until their dying days. Or do you mean this guy?

Comment 2016 - Warmest year on record (Score 1) 371

If you did put stock in the opinions of Nobel laureates, you'd want to look at more than one source to understand their broad consensus. Here's a declaration by 36 of them calling for urgent action on climate change. So 1/36 dissenters means that there's about a 97% consensus among Nobel laureates.

Comment Re: It doesn't work that way. (Score 2) 502

- in fact, the estimate you cite is absurd;

We've been tracking at the very highest end of that projection for the last few decades. Perhaps reality is also absurd.

you couldn't out-crawl even if your crutches floated away?

How fast do buildings run? The real question is "What is the cost of adapting to projected sea level rise?", or worse, as you are suggesting, "what is the cost of abandoning the beach front properties?"

Comment Re: It doesn't work that way. (Score 1) 502

That is complete nonsense. We're on track to have between half a meter and 1.5 meter sea level rise by the end of the century. That's on average - there will be less SLR near Greenland and more near USA. And we're currently tracking at the very high end of IPCC projections - so it looks like that number may be underestimated.

Comment IPCC lead author upset (Score 2) 502

Richard Tol, professor of the economics of climate change, was coordinating lead author for the United Nations Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change

I think he may have been upset when they pointed out that that he'd swapped a minus sign for a plus sign in his study. When you use the correct sign the economic outlook is less rosy. He ultimately admitted to the mistake and issued a correction to the original paper.

Comment Re:instrumentally homogeneous temperature records (Score 1) 502

You're on the wrong side of it.

Yes. Sorry about that.

If you're going to average temps over a decade, the effect will certainly be minimized.

Usually we'd want to look at 30 years or more to see what the climate is doing rather than focusing in on annual variability.

Comment Re:instrumentally homogeneous temperature records (Score 1) 502

There was also the warming event roughly 130 years ago following the cooling event of Krakatoa, but honestly nothing like this sustained increase over time over the intervening mean.

Looks like I misread. You're talking about warming following the cooling event of Krakatoa (1883). So I think you must be talking about 1910-1040? Yes that looks comparable, but it's not a separate event - it is really just the early part of the modern warming trend plus natural variability . http://woodfortrees.org/plot/h...

Comment Re:instrumentally homogeneous temperature records (Score 2) 502

There was also the warming event roughly 130 years ago following the cooling event of Krakatoa, but honestly nothing like this sustained increase over time over the intervening mean.

Krakatoa erupted in 1883. The 30 year trend leading up to that event is only 0.04/decade compared with 0.17/decade now: http://woodfortrees.org/plot/h...

Not comparable.

Comment Re:instrumentally homogeneous temperature records (Score 1) 502

Oh, there was a similar global warming trend, one that was even steeper than the current one. Roughly 65M years ago.

That similar global warming event didn't go so well for contemporaries of the period: "The Cretaceous–Paleogene (K–Pg) extinction event, also known as the Cretaceous–Tertiary (K–T) extinction, was a mass extinction of some three-quarters of the plant and animal species on Earth that occurred over a geologically short period of time approximately 66 million years ago."

I hope our current event isn't actually that similar...

Comment Alternate method? (Score 1) 502

The new study shows that the NOAA method works quite well. It may be worth trying an alternate and seeing how well it matches the instrumentally homogeneous reference data, but since we're dealing with temperature anomalies and not absolute temperatures It's not clear to me that it would make any difference.

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