Want to read Slashdot from your mobile device? Point it at m.slashdot.org and keep reading!

 



Forgot your password?
typodupeerror
Check out the new SourceForge HTML5 internet speed test! No Flash necessary and runs on all devices. ×

Why Gaming Sucks On Linux 357

lseltzer writes "Efforts have been made to improve the situation, but things have actually gotten worse for gaming on Linux rather than better. If you're a gamer you're just plain better off running Windows and dual-booting (or VMing) between the two operating systems than hoping your games will run in Cedega or some such product." From the article: "So where does all of this leave Linux gamers? One word: Windows. Yep, you read that right. If you're a gamer, do yourself a favor and just buy a copy of Windows and set up a dual-boot system. Why bother to torture yourself with the headaches presented by Linux gaming? Why should you continually not have the games you want to play? Why settle for half-assed solutions that might or might not run the games you crave so desperately?"
This discussion has been archived. No new comments can be posted.

Why Gaming Sucks On Linux

Comments Filter:
  • Because.... (Score:4, Funny)

    by drdanny_orig ( 585847 ) * on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @03:36PM (#16662755)
    Why bother to torture yourself with the headaches presented by Linux gaming? Why should you continually not have the games you want to play? Why settle for half-assed solutions that might or might not run the games you crave so desperately?
    Because if not, the terrorists will have won!
  • by Anonymous Coward
    Why Gaming Sucks On Linux
    By Jim Lynch

    Despite last week's article about running World of Warcraft on Linux with CodeWeavers' CrossOver, I can't help but feel a sense of despair when I think of gaming under Linux. It seems that over the last few years, with a few exceptions, things have gotten worse rather than better. Frankly, I've had it with gaming under Linux. It's not worth the time or the effort.

    The Tragedy of Loki
    You might remember that a while back a company named Loki Games tried to make a business o
  • by psyclone ( 187154 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @03:40PM (#16662809)
    Dual booting is okay for games, but how about when you want to play music in the background? And all of your music is on your ext3, Reiser, or XFS file system? How is the read/write support from windows back to linux? I think there have been advances on read/writing NTFS from linux, but how about the other way around?
    • There are a couple of ext2 drivers for Windows with read and write support. They also support ext3, but last time I checked they treated it as an ext2 drive, so no journaling. The driver also completely ignores UNIX permissions, though that's understandable seeing that in most situations the permission info is useless even if you just dual-booted over to another install of the same OS.
    • easiest answer is to put all your music on a FAT32 partition, that's what I did when I tried to get a dual boot going. I think I used ext3 but I'm not certain and can't check it (my computer is 150 km away):
      I think there have been advances on read/writing NTFS from linux, but how about the other way around?
      *sarcasm* Windows is normally NTFS, so I imagine it can read/write properly from/to NTFS partitions *end sarcasm*
  • Not THAT bad (Score:5, Informative)

    by Reapman ( 740286 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @03:40PM (#16662819)
    Oh it's not that bad I don't think... yeah if your a gamer run Windows, but Linux is hardly the lost cause this summary makes it out to be. The only game I play right now that I need Windows for is FFXI. In Linux I play Civ4, WoW, UT'04 without problems (Civ4 does crash time to time, but it does in Windows too). I'm actually impressed with how far it's gotten over the years. Long way to go, but keep up the good work the guys at Wine and Cedega (yes I bought Cedega, and yes I got my moneys worth outa it in my opinion)
  • that seems a fairly counter-productive suggestion. Better not to buy windows and just buy the games that actually support linux out of the box. That's the only way to improve gaming on linux - get the games publishers to actually support linux from the start. Doom3, quake4, neverwinter nights... There are a few already.

    *sigh* Now I just wish I could take my own advice.
    • Which is a great suggestion if your goal is to improve gaming on Linux.

      It's not so great a suggestion if your goal is to play games.
      • by bad_fx ( 493443 )
        [blockquote]Which is a great suggestion if your goal is to improve gaming on Linux.

        It's not so great a suggestion if your goal is to play games.[/blockquote]

        Why do you seem to think these 2 things are mutually exclusive? My goal is to play games... on linux. Without having to reboot every time I want to and paying the microsoft tax just so I can (as well as paying the games companies... ) Long term, improving gaming on linux will help my primary goal of playing games...
  • Buy a console if you want to play games. A Wii is going to be cheaper than a top of the range graphics card, it will be up-to-date for many more years. Unless you are a fps addict (read that a first-person-shooter or frames-per-second to taste) the games are probably better too.
    • i have a windows machine, but this is still what i did. it was cheaper, as you mention, and gaming on windows can be a hassle sometimes too. when i was younger i had time for that. but now the most precious commodity i have is time. when i can squeeze in playing some games, i just fire up my game cube and don't worry about what will work or what wont. i'll do the same with the wii.

      when the kids have grown and gone, maybe i'll return to trying to keep up with pc games but that's at least 15 year
      • when the kids have grown and gone, maybe i'll return to trying to keep up with pc games but that's at least 15 years off. who knows what will be the best platform by then.

        By that time, Vista will almost be ready to ship, so just wait a few more months.
    • Actually, this Mac user decided to installed Windows XP on his MacBook Pro [hylobatidae.org], and discovered he had a completely serviceable Windows gaming machine hidden away in his work laptop.

      Considering I switched to Mac laptops to escape the horrors of getting Linux to work on random PC laptop hardware anyway... ;-)
    • by zoftie ( 195518 )
      There are two worlds, PC and Console gaming. Two have distinct and very different crowds. PC gamers demand richness and complexity of the game. Console gamers rather deterred by complexity. Reason, is mouse&keyboard, that consolers will never have by default, which PC will have. And thus the rift. Wii's gravity stick or whatever you wanna callit, is step away from PC crowd. It is entertainment, in a different sense. Entertainments in karaokeish sense, then 'escapist' type where you go on complex adventu
      • PC gamers demand richness and complexity of the game. Console gamers rather deterred by complexity.

        Actually, I think most console gamers buy consoles because they have the games they want to play, not because they're "deterred by complexity"

        The Wii is definitely a step away from the PC crowd, and you might be able to say the Wii is aiming for users deterred by complexity, but I don't think that's true of consoles in general.
      • Actually, I see the Wiimote as being more of a step toward PC gaming. Why? Because it's a pointer. The keyboard is NOT the main difference between console and PC games. The mouse is. Console controllers have been steadily gaining more buttons for years now, some even arranged in number pads and other keyboard-like arrangements (like the Atari Jaguar). They've all been lacking a mouse, though. (Except for niche peripherals like the SNES mouse, which was used for a grand total of 2 or 3 games... and can you n
    • What if you like to play strategy games? Somehow I don't think Civilization 4 or Rise of Nations will make it to the Wii. The same goes for tons of other strategy games both old and new.
      What if you want to play MMORPGS? MMORPGs are predominantly a PC experience currently. Sure there is Final Fantasy on the Xbox 360 or PS2 and WoW on Mac but the majority of them are Windows only.
    • Buy a console if you want to play games.

      If you want to play the kind of games that are the focus of the console market, that's a good idea; if you are into the kind of games that include some of the best selling PC games (like the Civ series, The Sims series, etc.), buying a console does you little good because console versions tend to lag far behind PC releases if they ever occur at all. And, of course, the console versions often lack capabilities that are in the PC versions, particularly as regards custo

  • OpenGL (Score:5, Interesting)

    by aralin ( 107264 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @03:46PM (#16662903)
    It is all about OpenGL vs DirectX. As long as developers will opt for DirectX, the games are not going to be portable to Mac OS X and Linux. And if the trend ever reverses, we might have a chance. Anyway, most people just buy a game console and are done with it. But there is a ray of hope in the fact that these consoles start to use Linux and OpenGL to run/make games. So theoretically...
    • by rblum ( 211213 )
      I sugest you actually try porting a game. Yes, OGL/DX is a major factor, but if you think the rest just needs to be recompiled, I suggest you think again.

      * Sound on Linux is, well, "a debacle" comes to mind
      * File I/O is different
      * Input devices are handled differently
      * Networking is ever so slightly different. (Go Winsock! :( )
      * If you thought DX capability flags are a nightmare, you need to spend more time with OGL vendor extensions

      And I'm still waiting for a console actually using OGL. Where'd you get tha
    • by crush ( 19364 )
      And, there are a very restricted number of video cards with good open/free drivers for them. (ATi cards with up to and including r300 [sourceforge.net] have pretty good drivers (GL 1.0 is supported with the Mesa driver) and there are reports that the nouveau [freedesktop.org] drivers included in FC6 are actually working now for some nVidia cards.

      But in general, gaming sucks on Linux because the video card manufacturers have made it hard to get accelerated graphics working with the open standard, then on top of this is your very valid point a
      • by Lehk228 ( 705449 )
        Intel has stepped up to the plate on that, they have open sourced their video drivers with full support of all features. granted Intel graphics isn't what most people think of when they think of gaming, but stable and functional drivers with a medeocre card is better than constant problems and crashes with a high end card and a binary blob as a device driver.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      This is utter rubbish. Our company has plenty of experience porting from Direct3D to OpenGL.

      It isnt just possible, it has happened - frequently.
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by ad0gg ( 594412 )
      Maybe open source guys should get off their behind and create a decent competitor to directx. Open GL is an ok solution, you have write extensions to do anything fancy and there's directx which has everything there for you.
    • OpenGL != DirectX.

      OpenGL is close to what Direct3d offers, but Direct3d is offering a LOT more than OpenGL currently can. Even the latest additions to OpenGL do not bring it to what Direct3d 9.0, let alone 10.0 offer

      Now if you want to include the fact that the DirectX suite has a tonne more functionality than just Direct3D, like DirectSound, DirectPlay, DirectInput, DirectDraw, there is no way in heck that OpenGL can compete with it. DirectX is exactly why developers have made the move to it (includin
      • by joeljkp ( 254783 )
        There is one: SDL. Now to get people to use it...

      • by jZnat ( 793348 ) *
        OpenGL is only the graphics. There are great libraries like SDL (for input, 2d, sound) and OpenAL (sound). In fact, SDL practically is an all-in-one API for game programming (and many other media-based programs); you just need to use OpenGL for 3d graphics.

        Besides, the only people that need to worry about these details typically are those who create the game engines (e.g. id, Unreal); other game developers use said engines which should be abstracting that sort of stuff in the first place.
    • by OzPhIsH ( 560038 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @05:07PM (#16664377) Journal
      The thing is, is that DirectX is a complete Windows gaming development environment. Implementing sound, movies, network play, and all that other good stuff that makes up gaming is way easy via DirectX, essentially providing a good abstraction from having to deal with all those hardware issues directly. DirectX is WAY more than just Direct3D. This ease of use is just going to attract more budding devs who want to just jump right in to creating games. Why would a newb hobbiest game programmer even want to mess with getting all those pieces to work together in Linux? If you're just learning the ropes, you're probably going to use the easiest package out there to get your feet wet, which is DirectX. That experience is just going to carry over and influence decisions of said newb turns into professional game dev. In that respect, Linux really needs to get its shit together. There is no layer of unification between all these subsystems that games use that is consistant across all linux platforms, like one finds with DirectX on Windows. Has Linux finally moved onto a mature sound sub system? Using my Ubuntu DD as example, why the hell, if I'm listening to an mp3 via a media player while surfing the web and see a video on you tube I want to watch, does the sound not Just Work? I have to close the player freeing the sound resource, restart the browser, and then revisit the page. What a pain. How the hell is busted architecture supposed to support all the layers of sound and music in a game? Another contention I have is OpenGL itself. What happened? Direct3D simply has more advanced support for today's hardware capabilities. Every game I do play that has both rendering options, the Direct3D version has far superior visuals. One particular example I can recall is some transparant surfaces in FarCry. When switching to openGl, some of those surfaces lose their transparancy, turing into shiny, but opaqe surfaces. This is simply unacceptable in todays games. While I don't know if it is necessarily a result of the difference of capabilites between Direct3D and OpenGL, or simply lazy devs, it just makes you wonder.

      God what a ramble.. But the unfortunate reality is that developing games for linux is a nightmare compared to windows. I want to ditch Microsoft as much as anybody. It is such a pain in the ass, the way they go out of their way, to make you go out of your way, just to get your pc to do what you want.. But what when I want to do is play a game with all the latest whiz bang features, there just isn't any other choice.

    • by ivan256 ( 17499 )
      Let's forget for a moment that OpenGL is just graphics, while directx handles audio, user input, etc...

      The trend may be reversing itself shortly. DirectX 10 will be Vista only. The majority of PC gamers, however, will not have Vista for years. That means most game developers will continue to write for DirectX 9, or write games that support both 9 & 10 in the case where they want their game to run on Xbox. If DirectX 9 support from Microsoft is discontinued, the majority of game developers will find anot
  • -without crashing? Seriously, one of my favorite PC games (a windows game), plays better under Wine than in Windows. Wine hasn't emulated all the bugs yet, so my game doesn't crash at all, as opposed to windows, where it is one of two apps that actually can take my system down. Actually, even more funny, it's not just Linux it works in, I play it on something even less friendly: BSD, but I did have it up under Linux/Wine too... Yeah, gamin gwithout crashes sucks. I feel so abused.
  • I leave the answer as an exercise for the reader.
  • Getting worse? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by scribblej ( 195445 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @03:58PM (#16663141)
    I can't see how that's supported by the fucking article.

    I'm not a linux gaming apologist. It sucks on Linux, I can't deny. I've not tried crossover, but I DO subscribe to Transgaming. I've only been able to get a couple of old games to run well enough to play after much tweaking. Lately I find it's easier, in fact, to get a CD crack and use regular-old-wine for most of the games I would play.

    My examples are Fallout II and Planescape: Torment. Both reasonably old games. I was completely, and utterly unable to get either one to install under Cedega. Both installed, and after using CD cracks, played on regular Wine. Although it DID take considerable trying of different settings to hit on a configuration that was useable given my parameters: I wanted it to play in a Window, not take up the full screen. Both worked full-screen right off the bat.

    I, personally, find the Cedega interface (point2play) to be nasty and difficult to use. But I admit they're trying very hard to make it easier -- the buit in updater/upgrader has always been nice, and the recent addition of a database of game settings for a variety of games is also nice -- although as usual none of the games *I* am interested in is on the list!

    That's all I guess. I don't have any mystical insight... just my report as a user. I guess it might be interesting to some that Wine often works "better" than Cedega.

    -Chris

  • by michaelsimms ( 141209 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @04:05PM (#16663291) Homepage
    You know, myself and others at Tux Games [tuxgames.com] and LGP [linuxganmepublishing.com] work long long hours to get games on Linux. This week Ive done about 30 hours and so far its only the end of tuesday. Thanks for your support, slashdot, in telling me and my staff that we are wasting our time.


    It really drives me mad when slashdot refuses to post articles about the last 3 games we released, despite at least 30 or 40 people (that I know of) sending in messages about it, and then go criticise the state of Linux games. If they did their bit maybe our company would be in a better position to get the licenses for more games.

    • Did you forget to hand them the bundle of money like Roland P. does in return for their shilling?

      I think that's you have a good point. Unless you absolutely have to have the latest flavor of the month, there are plenty of fun games for both OS X and Linux without having to reboot. It seems like everything that is popular in the "dedicated gamer" crowd is a varying flavor of a first person shooter anyway.
    • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

      by dolson ( 634094 )
      I did submit an article to Slashdot about the release of a game not long ago by LGP, and as Michael says, indeed, they refused to post it. I guess bitching about the situation is more fun than supporting the only real company trying to make a difference.
    • LGP [linuxgamepublishing.com]
      • Whoops - thanks.
        I think I was a bit heated when I was writing there {:-) I didnt check as well as I should {:-)
    • by PygmySurfer ( 442860 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @04:54PM (#16664087)
      Maybe if LGP didn't sell a game [linuxgamepublishing.com] for £20.00, then sell an UPDATE [linuxgamepublishing.com] for £3.00 which actually doesn't add any new functionality, but merely provides support for that game from LGP and the ability to install future updates, people would be more receptive.

      Maybe if Tux Games didn't charge $35 more [tuxgames.com] for Quake IV than Best Buy [bestbuy.com] does for the Windows version, they'd get more sales.

      What do you mean by doing "their bit"? Should they keep their mouth shut about the problems they have running the games they want to play, yet shout from the rooftops when something actually IS released that supports Linux? Should they purchase games they don't want, to generate more sales for you, which is really the only thing that's going to entice developers to give your company licenses for more games.
      • by michaelsimms ( 141209 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @05:07PM (#16664365) Homepage
        > Maybe if LGP didn't sell a game for £20.00, then sell an UPDATE for £3.00 which actually doesn't add any
        > new functionality, but merely provides support for that game from LGP and the ability to install future
        > updates, people would be more receptive.

        Yessss and if you had RESEARCHED this properly you would understand. The update we sell is for the LOKI version so that to get support people dont have to pay and get a whole new game. We arent going to support the loki version because a) its not our game, we dont have the source, and b) its not our game. The update is sold so people get a supported game for LESS.

        > Maybe if Tux Games didn't charge $35 more for Quake IV than Best Buy does for the Windows version, they'd
        > get more sales.

        We are in the UK, we have to pay a lot more for the games we buy. We actually make NO PROFIT on over half of the games we sell. We sell them at cost price.

        > What do you mean by doing "their bit"? Should they keep their mouth shut about the problems they have
        > running the games they want to play, yet shout from the rooftops when something actually IS released that
        > supports Linux?

        No but nor should they ignore any progress Linux gaming makes and criticise Linux gaming on a regular basis. Some of each would be nice.

        > Should they purchase games they don't want, to generate more sales for you, which is really
        > the only thing that's going to entice developers to give your company licenses for more games.

        If slashdot reports on the games that are available, sales go up. Thats a fact of the slashdot effect. If we get more sales we can afford more licenses. That is the fact of licensing games. Companies that we license games from care about MONEY, and if we sell more games we license bigger games. I dont want ANYONE to buy games they dont want, but letting people know what is out there would allow people to know about them and buy them IF they want.
    • Thanks for your support, slashdot, in telling me and my staff that we are wasting our time.

      The opinions expressed by a sloshdot article do not necessarily reflect the views of Slashdot's Editors, Subscribers, Karma Whores, Trolls or ME. Every once in a while, yes. This one not so much.

      I gave up my windows partition long ago and will never go back, thanks in large part to WINE, Cedega, and you guys. You have my eternal appreciation. The only time I see that damn logo is now in a VM and as rarely as I ca

    • Well YOU could have mentioned those games, too, you know, but you didn't.

      No need to get insulted, though. Go for a walk...get some sunlight. Feel the warmth on your face! Don't push yourself too hard..preserve your hands and your sanity. I've been in the ultra crunch state, too, pardner. Don't burn out.

      I did not rt*a, but I think what they might be getting at is the fact that Windows has a ton of games already written for it, AND the momentum of being the default platform. Linux has some good advantag
  • Failure to convert (Score:2, Informative)

    by fr175 ( 999487 )
    I recently spent 3 months with Ubuntu (6.06 LTS) after moving from Win XP Pro. I use the PC primarily for gaming, but took the Linux plunge when a trojan forced a reinstall of Windows (Side note,the trojan was my own fault as I ran an exe intentionally when I figured the risk was worth the potential reward). Using Cedega, I was able to play WoW, SWG, HL2, Guild Wars, and others. However, while these games were able to run, they didn't run well, and didn't come close to the performance in Windows. Obviou
  • by zborgerd ( 871324 ) <zborgerd@NOSPam.gmail.com> on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @04:18PM (#16663505) Homepage
    http://linuxgamepublishing.com/ [linuxgamepublishing.com]

    LGP has stepped in to fill the void that Loki left. In fact, they've already outlasted Loki and still appear to be pushing on, and several of their games are excellent.

    The author misses a few critical points when he looks at Linux games. First, many companies are porting in-house rather than having a third party do the work. Often, these binaries are downloadable from the companies website rather than shipping them on the CD (Quake 3, Neverwinter Nights, Darwinia, etc.). Also - Sometimes things take time. I wouldn't say that Linux gaming is "worse", but is perhaps "different" than it was when Loki was around. Companies are being cautious. Take a look at the slew of high-cost Activision games that Loki managed to score, only to run themselves into the ground. Think that there is perhaps a reason for their fall?

    I don't believe that WINE is an appropriate alternative to having a dedicated Windows gaming system. But for those that casually game on Linux, or play more console games than Linux games, we can still find many excellent Linux games available without resorting to using WINE. I feel that the author's turn from discussing Loki ports to using WINE for gaming on Linux misses the bigger picture... Because it simply details his bad experience with using WINE for serious gaming. *NOT ONCE* was a modern native Linux game mentioned, and there are several games that are (in my opinion) MUCH BETTER than many of the Loki offerings. So, basically his gripe is about being unable to play Call of Duty on Linux. Good job on summing up how well a compatibility layer works instead of talking about real Linux games.

    I must confess... It really pisses me off when I post announcements about legitimate Linux games from LGP and other companies, and Slashdot mods neglect to inform the community by rejecting the article, further perpetuating the cycle of "sucky Linux gaming" because people are ignorant of the games that *ARE* out there... Yet, crap like this ExtremeTech article manges to get front-page news. Good job mods!

    That said, it's my understanding that LGP has a few AAA games coming up that will knock our socks off. Will they be ignored by the Slashdot crew like the last few great games were? I sure as hell hope not, because I'm sick of reading articles like this. IF YOU WANT MORE GAMES ON LINUX, STOP BEING LIKE THIS EXTREMETECH GUY AND BUY LINUX GAMES INSTEAD OF RESORTING TO WINE AND BITCHING ABOUT HOW IT DOESN'T WORK!
  • Why bother with Windows at all? I have a large enough backlog in my "to play" list at the moment between handhelds and my PS2 that I don't really have *room* to add another platform anyway. And that's without considering the games that natively exist on Linux that I find myself playing as much or more than commercial efforts: Wesnoth, Nethack, lots and lots of IF, Flightgear, Freeciv, retro games under emulation, and so forth.

    And I don't have to get on the graphics card treadmill, either.

  • Last generation, I finally gave up keeping two separate PC's (one for Linux, one for gaming), and bought an Xbox 360. My Linux PC does everything non-gaming I need/want to do, and I fire up the 360 when I want to game. Problem solved.

    BTW, for others who do this: if you want to stream audio from Linux to the 360, Google "x360mediaserve" (or go find it on SourceForge).
  • by michaelsimms ( 141209 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @04:39PM (#16663845) Homepage
    Since Loki died, the following games have been released.

    Majesty Gold [tuxgames.com]
    Return to Castle Wolfenstein [tuxgames.com]
    Creatures Internet Edition [tuxgames.com]
    Doom 3 [tuxgames.com]
    Unreal Tournament 2003 [tuxgames.com]
    Candy Cruncher [tuxgames.com]
    Uplink [tuxgames.com]
    Medal of Honor: Allied Assault [tuxgames.com]
    Neverwinter Nights: Shadows of Undrentide [tuxgames.com]
    Hyperspace Delivery Boy [tuxgames.com]
    NingPo MahJong [tuxgames.com]
    Soul Ride [tuxgames.com]
    Savage: The Battle for Newerth [tuxgames.com]
    Neverwinter Nights: Hordes of the Underdark [tuxgames.com]
    Dominions II: The Ascension Wars [tuxgames.com]
    Gorky 17 [tuxgames.com]
    Software Tycoon [tuxgames.com]
    Unreal Tournament 2004 [tuxgames.com]
    Northland [tuxgames.com]
    Postal 2: Share the Pain [tuxgames.com]
    Darwinia [tuxgames.com]
    Doom 3: Resurrection of Evil [tuxgames.com]
    Robin Hood: The Legend of Sherwood [tuxgames.com]
    X2: The Threat [tuxgames.com]
    Quake IV [tuxgames.com]
    Tribal Trouble [tuxgames.com]
    Airline Tycoon Deluxe [tuxgames.com]
    Cold War [tuxgames.com]
    Dominions 3: The Awakening [tuxgames.com]

    A lot of these games may be older, but not all of them, and most of them are top notch and FUN games. Go try some, and enjoy them! Natively, no need for emulators, or rebooting. Now if you can tell me that there is no way to play games on Linux, I think I'll have to just disagree.

    Right now we are working on a number of deals for some games that will be far better than anything Loki managed to publish. Of course when we do, I am sure slashdot will ignore the release announcements and continue to report on the death of Linux gaming.

    • I'll testify to Cold War and the whole Neverwinter Nights catalog. Not to mention the, what, four or five premium modules, all of which play on Linux? There's a lot of game there (not including the massive community expansion packs and additional community generated content).

      I'm still sore about NWN2, and I worry that Atari/Obsidian's treatment of the community contributors will result in a smaller community of content creators, and thusly less popularity for the game in general. Which would mean no NWN3 (o
  • No games? (Score:5, Funny)

    by Klaidas ( 981300 ) on Tuesday October 31, 2006 @04:43PM (#16663917)
    Huh, what do you mean no games?! There are plenty of them:
    1. Extreme Man Page Reading
    2. Obscure error puzzle palace
    3. Mega Nmap Death Ping
    4. Ksolitaire
    5. sudo
    6. IRC
    7. Learning Emacs
    I could go on and on!
    Ok, let's close the sarcasm tag for now. This is not news. How did it get to the front page? It has been obvious for years.
  • With Linux, I don't have to sift through the excrement of ignorant/lazy/greedy game companies to find decent games.
  • Actually, why Windows Gaming Sucks on Linux.

    Not enough OpenGL,SDL developers at Ubisoft/EA/Atari and so on.

It seems that more and more mathematicians are using a new, high level language named "research student".

Working...