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Submission + - Where is the rugged 16GB RAM / 1TB Storage / 20 hrs. battery tablet?

Qbertino writes: I’m a tablet user. I bought the HTC Flyer when it was just roughly 1,5 years old to fiddle with it and program for it. I was hooked pretty quickly and it became part of my EDC. The hardware has since become way outdated, but I still think it’s one of the best tablets ever built in terms of quality and consistency. About a roughly four years later I moved to a then current 10“ Yoga 2 with Atom CPU & LTE module + a SD slot for a 64GB card. I’m very happy with the device and it goes with me where ever I go. It has 12 — 16 hours of battery time, depending on usage and basically is my virtual bookshelf/music/multimedia/mailing device and keeps the strain on my eyes and my fingers to a minimum. It has some power-button issues, but those are bearable considering all the other upsides.

I’ve got everything on this device and it has basically become my primary commodity computer. My laptops are almost exclusively in use when I need to code or do task where performance is key, such as 3D or non-trivial image editing.

In a nutshell, I’m a happy tablet user, I consider it more important than having the latest phone — my Moto G2 is serving me just fine — and I’m really wondering why there are no tablets that build on top of this. Memory is scarce on these devices (RAM and storage) as often is battery time.

Most tablets feel flimsy (the Yoga 2 and Yoga 3 being a rare exception) and have laughable battery times (again, the Yoga models being a rare exception). However, I’ve yet to find a tablet that does not give me storage or memory problems in some way or other, lasts for a day or two in power and doesn’t feel chinsy and like it won’t stand a month of regular everyday use and carrying around in an EDC bag.

Of course, we all know that RAM is an artificial scarcity on mobile devices, so the manufacturers can charge obscene amounts of money for upgrades but 1GB as a standard? That’s very tight by todays standards. Not speaking of storage. Is it such a big deal adding 128GB or perhaps even 256GB of storage to these devices as a default? Why has none of the manufacturers broken rank? Do you think there’s a market for the type of tablet described in the title and we can expect some movement in that direction or am I on my own here?

What are your thoughts and observations on the tablet market? Do you think they are the convergence devices we’ve all been waiting for — as apparently Apple and Aquaris & Ubuntu seem to think? (I’d agree to some extent btw.)

Your educated opinion is requested. Thanks.

Submission + - systemd starts killing your background processes by default (blog.fefe.de) 1

nautsch writes: systemd changed a default value in logind.conf to "yes", which will kill all your processes, when you log out. And as always: It's not a bug, it's a feature. Translated from the german source: "Bug of the day: systemd kills background processes on logout". There is already a bug-report over at debian: Debian bug tracker (link also from the source)

Submission + - It's No 'Accident,' Safety Advocates Want to Speak of Car 'Crashes' Instead 1

HughPickens.com writes: Matt Richtel writes in the NYT that roadway fatalities are soaring at a rate not seen in 50 years, resulting from crashes, collisions and other incidents caused by drivers. But don’t call them accidents as a growing number of safety advocates campaign to change a 100-year-old mentality that they say trivializes the single most common cause of traffic incidents: human error. “When you use the word ‘accident,’ it’s like, ‘God made it happen,’ ” says Mark Rosekind. “In our society, language can be everything.” Rosekind says that the persistence of crashes — driving is the most dangerous activity for most people — can be explained in part by widespread apathy toward the issue. Changing semantics is meant to shake people, particularly policy makers, out of the implicit nobody’s-fault attitude that the word “accident” conveys. The state of Nevada just enacted a law to change “accident” to “crash” in dozens of instances where the word is mentioned in state laws, like those covering police and insurance reports and at least 28 state departments of transportation have moved away from the term “accident” when referring to roadway incidents.

The word 'accident' was introduced into the lexicon of manufacturing and other industries in the early 1900s, when companies were looking to protect themselves from the costs of caring for workers who were injured on the job, says historian Peter Norton. "Relentless safety campaigns started calling these events ‘accidents,’ which excused the employer of responsibility,” says Norton. When traffic deaths spiked in the 1920s, a consortium of auto-industry interests, including insurers, borrowed the wording to shift the focus away from the cars themselves. “Automakers were very interested in blaming reckless drivers,” says Norton. But over time the word has come to exonerate the driver, too, with “accident” seeming like a lightning strike, beyond anyone’s control. “Labeling most of the motor vehicle collision cases that I see as an attorney as an ‘accident’ has always been troubling to me," says Steven Gursten. "The word ‘accident’ implies there’s no responsibility for it."

Submission + - Study shows FACEBOOK tends to censor stuff from the political right.... (mrctv.org)

lugannerd writes: I always love to see slashdotters chime in politically for giggles.
From the article --> Generally, media have covered the accusations that the social media site is censoring conservative news and sources from their trending news feed. Coincidentally, this is also the part of the Facebook story affecting the media.

Potentially a bigger scandal (because it affects more people) is the accusation that Facebook censors individual member pages, blogs, smaller media outlets, and discussion groups reflecting a conservative point of view. Sometimes, the sites are shut down, sometimes they are simply threatened into silence.

Comment Re:An example of conversation... (Score 2) 103

Result from English - Chinese (traditional) - English (the original text is yours):

Person A: Look at this amazing gadget! It let me hear what you're saying German English! There is a spare. Put it in your ear, you can hear me translate it into English and German!

Person B: Great! Now, our different languages will not stop us from understanding each other!

A: Imagine, with this, we can break with the development of mutual understanding and mutual interference language barriers. This may be the answer to world peace!

B: I do not think so. Good luck and let this thing to have to say what Donald Trump has brought peace.

===
Thai:

Man A: See this amazing gadget! It helps me to hear what you're saying in German, in English! This is Parts Put it in your ear and you can hear in English and translated into German!

Man B: Great! Now, a different language, we will not stop us from understanding each other!

A: I think on this we can break down the language barriers that interfere with the development of a common understanding of one another. This might be the answer to world peace!

B: I'm not sure about that. Good luck getting this thing to turn what Donald Trump has to say is quiet.

Comment Re:An example of conversation... (Score 2) 103

Well, that's quite a surprising outcome for your experiment. The general meaning of the conversation didn't get lost in translation, and while there was a little weirdness, a sane human being is perfectly capable of understanding that.

Did you try other languages - more exotic ones, such as Mandarin or Vietnamese?

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Alternatives to "atomic" clocks 2

Tony Isaac writes: "Atomic" clocks that you can buy in stores, synchronize time using the WWVB shortwave band from NIST in Boulder. The problem is, this signal is notoriously weak, making these clocks very sensitive to interference by other RF or electronic devices, or less-than-ideal reception conditions. In many locations, these clocks are never able to receive a time signal, making them no better at timekeeping than a cheap quartz clock. There are other ways to synchronize clock time: NTP over WiFi, GPS, or cellular. The cheapest clocks that use NTP over WiFi cost around $400. Really??? And while there are plenty of GPS-enabled smartwatches in the $100 price range, there don't seem to be any similar wall clocks. Are there any reasonably-priced wall clock alternatives, that use something other than shortwave to set the time?
User Journal

Journal Journal: Quote of the century (so far)!

From here:

http://slashdot.org/comments.pl?sid=1434032&cid=30052088

"stupidity is an equal opportunity striker"

Winner! Thanks, Bill Dog! My sig now!

Submission + - Neither sysvinit nor systemd: the daemontools family

Art3x writes: It seems everyone was fine using sysvinit until systemd came along, but history is more complicated. A third way, the daemontools family, has ridden alongside since the '90s. Recent examples include runit and nosh. With its small programs and heavy use of the filesystem, it sounds at least as unixy as sysvinit. But with its parallel start-up and elegant set-up, could it also compete against systemd?

Submission + - A second Little Ice Age uncovered

An anonymous reader writes: New data, compiled from tree rings in Russia, suggests that a previously undetected little ice age occurred in the 6th and 7th centuries, caused by a combination of volcanoes and low sunspot counts.

This cold spell would have preceded the Medieval Warm Period centered around 1000 AD that was followed by the already known Little Ice Age centered around 1600 AD. Note that no fossil fuel regulations or carbon taxes were used in creating this cold period. Note also this description of the consequences of that cold period:

The poor climate may been one of many factors contributing to societal changes of the era, including widespread crop failures and famines in Central Asia that may have triggered migrations from the area to China and Eastern Europe, thus helping spread an episode of plague (depicted in this 15th century painting) that originated there.

Famine and plague, caused by extreme cold, illustrating starkly that cooling is a far greater threat to human survival than climate warming. Meanwhile, the Medieval Warm Period saw a flourishing of American Indian culture in the American southwest.

So why do our modern climate doom-sayers fear warming so much, when there is no data to justify that fear, and plenty of data to suggest otherwise.

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