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The Top 100 Best-Selling PC Games of the Century 97

Ground Glass writes "They already did this for consoles and handhelds, but now Next Generationhas finished the cycle by releasing a rather more interesting list of the best-selling PC games released since 2000. It's more interesting as, since most everyone has a Windows PC in some form or another, the games that are purchased for it are...rather more esoteric than you'd see being bought on console. You may also notice the sales numbers are quite a bit lower than on the other lists — is this the spectre of piracy given form? In any case, there's plenty of data to interpret here."
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The Top 100 Best-Selling PC Games of the Century

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  • "Century"? (Score:5, Funny)

    by DesireCampbell ( 923687 ) <desire.c@gmail.com> on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @08:52AM (#16044146) Homepage
    This is like announcing the best games of the year in January.
  • Gosh (Score:5, Informative)

    by masklinn ( 823351 ) <slashdot@org.masklinn@net> on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @08:52AM (#16044150)

    Print link [next-gen.biz] because, seriously, 10 words/page just so they can display more ads is annoying

    • by Enoxice ( 993945 )
      That link is pretty bad, too. I can't figure out which picture and description go to which title: http://www.next-gen.biz/images/stories/PCTop100/98 _slots2bboop.jpg [next-gen.biz] probably doesn't go to 'Jurassic Park III: Danger Zone!', as it seems to indicate.
      • They forgot a "clear: left;" or something in their styles. Actually it looks like they just straight left out some markup. We know they're fucking idiots anyway because they claim to have copyrighted the ordering of their list. Well, if they did it right, then they can't copyright it, because the order is based on the facts, and you can't protect those - the fact of number of units sold is what they're trying to copyright here.
        • We know they're fucking idiots anyway because they claim to have copyrighted the ordering of their list. Well, if they did it right, then they can't copyright it, because the order is based on the facts, and you can't protect those - the fact of number of units sold is what they're trying to copyright here.

          Even if a top-100 list can't be copyrighted, I'm sure that "A method for ordering entities in descending order by some measurement of success and displaying the first n entries (where n is an integer)

          • You can't just photocopy a phone book, but you CAN scan/ocr it, do your own layout of the same information, and publish your own phone book. This is in fact why there are multiple phone books out there.
            • Re: (Score:3, Informative)

              No you can't - copying and modifying is a breach of copyright law in most jurisdictions.

              If you want to produce a phone book yourself then you need to compile the information yourself. Perhaps you'll use the same sources they used; perhaps different. Perhaps some/all of these sources are themselves copyrighted and you'll need to pay a licence fee.

              Makers of phone books and similar directories will sometimes insert phony entries so they can catch any competitors who copy their data.
  • Variety... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by ChowRiit ( 939581 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @08:59AM (#16044198)
    There tend to be a lot MORE PC games than console games released, so the market is more spread. The report is also only since 2000, which means that games from '05 and '06 have had far less time to sell budget copies and the like, than big games released 5 or 6 years ago.

    Also, some people have terrible taste...
    • Re:Variety... (Score:5, Interesting)

      by masklinn ( 823351 ) <slashdot@org.masklinn@net> on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @09:06AM (#16044242)
      And the numbers are also USA only, the charts would go much higher if they were, say, worldwide, or even Japanese only (for example no console game goes above 2.5m sales, in Japan the DS alone has 3 3-million sellers)
      • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

        by ChowRiit ( 939581 )
        The USA market as a whole has never been known for uh... informed buying habits. Say, Deer Hunter is high on the list! What a shock...
        • "The USA market as a whole has never been known for uh... informed buying habits. Say, Deer Hunter is high on the list! What a shock..."

          As I recall, Deer Hunter was cheap, a simple concept, and had mass appeal. I could see my Dad picking up that game, for example, but never Quake. I couldn't tell you from first hand experience that it was a good game, but I wouldn't make rash judgements on the informedness of American markets based on the sales of Deer Hunter.
          • I only meant it as a humerous comment, but my point was this is sales of games in shops, often big stores like Wal-Mart, so a lot of these are going to be impulse purchases et cetera, rather than buying a game you've read reviews of et cetera.

            Also, Deer Hunter was apparently terrible, it got some impressively low scores, but involved shooting cute animals for no particular reason, so sold well.
      • by mwvdlee ( 775178 )
        Including Korea would probably slam Starcraft firmly at #1.
        WoW is probably selling like hot cakes, so it shouldn't take too long for it to overtake Diablo II.
        Notice a pattern here? I've never been much of a fan of the genre, but you've got to admire Blizzard for doing so well.
        • Starcraft is pre-2000 ('97 if I remember right? Definately later 90s), therefore wouldn't make it on the list. If you did a list of sales all time, via online AND stores, from the whole world, and I'm not sure what would win. I rather suspect it would be something suprising though, most likely an older game that's just kept selling for a long time... I'd be interested to see the results of any study like that, although I doubt the data's there to do a decent study.
      • Re: (Score:1, Flamebait)

        Yes but most of us in North America don't really enjoy tentacles 'attacking' scantily clad anime girls.
        • I must say that even though I tried to find them as hard as I could, I still have to find tentacles and scantily clad schoolgirls in New Super Mario Bros, Animal Crossing or Brain Age.

          Could I know the way to get to them?

          • did you try to Konami code?
          • by KDR_11k ( 778916 )
            We're talking about PC games here. While it's true that not all PC games are Hentai games in Japan, the vast majority is and as such if you're looking for PC games in a japanese store you get guided into the basement, into the corner with the porn.

            PC gaming has pretty much zero presence in Japan and as such including that market would be pointless. Europe is a different thing altogether, in some European markets PC games outsell console games regularly.
  • US only, stores only (Score:5, Interesting)

    by LarsWestergren ( 9033 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @09:02AM (#16044215) Homepage Journal
    These numbers are for the US only. In Sweden at least, the PC is still the number one platform, though if you take all the different consoles and handhelds games taken together that is a bigger market. They people who did this article also admit that they don't count sales by, for instance, Steam.

    Penny Arcade summed it up pretty well I think -
    "Also, when it was announced that Dark Messiah would be built using the Valve's Source engine, I said that if a publisher of Ubisoft's scale chose to deliver a title through Steam, digital delivery would quickly cease being a novelty. Well, that's happening. One sometimes hears that PC gaming is dead, and then you see something like what Valve is doing with Episode 2 and warmth spreads throughout your entire body - even if their bet is being hedged on next-gen systems. We know how good we have it. But try to find evidence of a strong PC platform at dedicated game retailers and the main thing you will find is that they have no interest in it. The games can't be traded in, and a PC gamer probably doesn't attach guides or peripherals to their purchases at the same rate, so it exists outside the philosophical continuum of their business. I'm aware that many gamers find Steam or other ethereal delivery methods distasteful, and I wonder how long they will have that luxury."

    Well, as long as Neverwinter Nights 2 comes, I will be a happy gamer for a looong time.
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by nutshell42 ( 557890 )
      Point in case:

      Half-Life 2
      Publisher: Vivendi Games
      Developer: Valve Software
      Released: Nov 04
      Estimated Sales: 680,000

      Valve says they've sold 4 million copies of Half-Life 2 (here [half-life2.com]). This means the list's numbers are less than 20% of all sales. The rest was sold outside the US (as the parent pointed out, the PC is more important in Europe and elsewhere) and online. While Valve's Steam means that this is probably more pronounced for HL2 than for other games (otoh certain genres tend to do better in differ

      • Oh and one other thing:

        The 21st century began 2001-01-01. The first decade of your life's over the day you've lived 10 years, i.e. your 11th birthday. Same principle applies here.

        So the correct title for the article would be "The Top 100 Best-Selling-According-To-A-Metric-Accounting-For- About-20%-Of-Sales-That's-Additionally-Skewing-Res ults PC Games of this Century-and-the-last-year-of-the-last-one." But I guess the editor shortened it.

        • The 21st century began 2001-01-01. The first decade of your life's over the day you've lived 10 years, i.e. your 11th birthday.

          Semantics, semantics. The year 2000 vs. 2001 issue is only because we have a tendancy to call years 1-100 the "first" century A.D. And even then, it is the scientists versus general populace. As far as I've read, the same nomenclature problem (if you can call it a problem) was raised between 1899-1901. You claim the 21st century didn't begin until 2001, but I would counter ins

        • The 21st century began 2001-01-01. The first decade of your life's over the day you've lived 10 years, i.e. your 11th birthday. Same principle applies here.

          This, of course, assumes that "century" is a fixed length of time. Is this actually accurate, with leap years and such ? And let's not forget that we've switched calendars a few times between year 1 and now...

  • It's just shocking how much this article exposes the decline of PC Gaming. In the 90's, top sellers were the Wing Commander Series, LucasArt Adventure Games, Command and Conquer RTSes, Doom, Tomb Raider, and other Genre-busters. On the other hand, the list for this decade breaks down to:

    - 1/3 "Edutainment" games
    - 1/3 "Classic" Shovelware
    - 1/3 Playing off of names from movies and OLD video games
    - 1 MMORPG that took the PC community by storm

    What's really shocking is that I can't find a single "must have" game
    • Re: (Score:3, Interesting)

      by ChowRiit ( 939581 )
      Firstly, it's on half the timeframe of the 90s you cite.

      More to the point, it's not a DECLINE, it's just a wider variety of people buying games, resulting in sales of games not purely based on the classic male, 20something gamer formulae. I hate the way people attribute a wider variety of people buying games to a decline..

      Also, I saw at least 4 MMORPGs, and you complain about using old games, and yet you refer to the Wing Commander series and the Command and Conquer RTSes. You can't have it both ways...
      • Firstly, it's on half the timeframe of the 90s you cite.

        3/5th's, actually. And all the best stuff was out by the mid-90's. (Being DOS-based and all.)

        More to the point, it's not a DECLINE, it's just a wider variety of people buying games

        I would agree if the titles on the list were all exemplary in their categories. But they're not. The Atari packages & Frogger remake are perfect examples of this. These packages were piss-poor excuses for releases, playing entirely on existing franchises without actually

        • MMOs: Star Wars Galaxies is in there, Dark Age of Camelot, the Everquest expansion pack (it was the only part of the series released after the 2000 cut off point), WoW of course. If there was another I've forgotten it, but I seem to remember seeing a 5th, could be wrong.

          The thing is, there's no comparison here of numbers sold compared to your 90s classics. So a few games are selling well by pitching themselves to impulse buyers, and hoping noone reads reviews and the like? As long as quality games are comin
          • by robson ( 60067 )
            MMOs: Star Wars Galaxies is in there, Dark Age of Camelot, the Everquest expansion pack (it was the only part of the series released after the 2000 cut off point), WoW of course. If there was another I've forgotten it, but I seem to remember seeing a 5th, could be wrong.

            The fifth MMO on the list is City of Heroes.
    • I disagree. There are several must have games on the list, including The Sims, FarCry, any of the Need for Speed games, and HalfLife. Alice is also an extraordinary game, and if you have not played it, I suggest going down and digging it out of the used game stash at your local EB Games or Gamestop.

      I do have to agree that PC gaming is pretty much dead. I have an Athlon 64 with an NVidia 6600, and still, if I have the choice between PC and console, I usually take the console, despite the fact that the PC is
    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by eepok ( 545733 )
      The list wasn't the "BEST GAMES of the last 5 years", it was "THE MOST STORE-BOUGHT games of the last 5 years".

      It has nothing to do with the quality of the games, but instead what people most frequently purchase at store as opposed to online/delivery or digital download (such as EQ expansion packs).
      • It has nothing to do with the quality of the games, but instead what people most frequently purchase at store

        Which tells you a lot about where the industry is going. Think about it. The game studios see these exact same numbers. When they find that putting out a POS like Frogger or Atari's Classic Collection nets them big bucks, which do you think they're going to invest in: The innovative games or the rehashed brands?
        • by KDR_11k ( 778916 )
          Don't forget that these are ranked by units sold, not money earned. A 50$ game selling 200k copies is going to bring in more money than a 10$ game selling 500k copies yet would be much lower in rank. Most of the cheap crap in that list is also sold for cheap which means it must make up for its price in volume.
        • by eepok ( 545733 )
          Well, those are just a couple of the target audiences. Companies target multiple audiences. If I had the money and the knowledge of these craptacular rehashes 10 years ago, I would have invested in the rights and pushed them on the unsuspecting Wal-Mart throngs myself. Deer Hunter! for god's sake.

          I don't think it's a show of market influence though. Blizzard et al aren't dropping their current money makers for the sake of Atari re-stamps and I'm not going to pop on over the next department store to buy my g
    • Did you read the article? First of all, it has three Blizzard games: Diablo II, Warcraft III and World of Warcraft. It has Halo. If those aren't "must have" games, then I'd like some of what you're smoking. Secondly, it *does* have "genre-busters", for instance, Black and White, trucking sims, train sims, or THE Sims.

      I think you had this gripe about how gaming was so much better "in the olden days" all thought up and probably half-written before you even glanced at the article in question. Sure the li
      • First of all, it has three Blizzard games

        So?

        Diablo II, Warcraft III and World of Warcraft

        More sequels that cash in on great games from the 90's! Whoo Hoo! You've just, like, totally proved me wrong, MAAAAN!

        It has Halo.

        Is that supposed to mean something? Halo is a run-of-the-mill first person shooter. It's big claim to fame was bringing a computer FPS experience to consoles. Considering that we're talking about PC Gaming, I'm not all that impressed.

        Secondly, it *does* have "genre-busters"

        Really? Well, this o

        • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

          by KDR_11k ( 778916 )
          Railroad Tycoon is an economy sim, not a train simulator. A train simulator is like a flight simulator, just with trains. I.e. you are the driver and can take the train along real routes. You don't worry about building routes or making a profit, you drive the train. Sounds boring and I suppose it really is but since the Microsoft Train Simulator is GAINING shelf space instead of losing it there has to be some pretty large demographic that enjoys it. Probably overlapping with the demographic for model trains
  • by SteroidG ( 609799 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @09:12AM (#16044277) Homepage
    You can name it "The top 100 best-selling games of the Millenium"!
  • There are some real stinkers on there. I was hoping to maybe find a gem in the list I hadn't given a shot yet, and didn't see ONE! It's bewildering to me that San Andreas didn't make the list either. That game is fundamentally more powerful than nearly any other game ever made on several levels. I've been especially enjoying SAMP, as well, which is a multiplayer mod. Not to be confused with "Multi Theft Auto" which sucks.

    Luckily the emulator scene is still going strong, so us PC gamers can still run lo
    • It's bewildering to me that San Andreas didn't make the list either.

      Keep in mind that each franchise is only listed once on the list. GTA3 was the best selling title in the franchise on PC in the last 6 years with 420,000 units, but franchise sales were 1.1 million. So even if Vice City matched GTA3's 420K, San Andreas still sold at least 260,000 units, which beats many games on the list.

  • The article is trash.

    It throws out some easily refutable numbers. World or Warcraft and it's 6.5+ million subscribers makes it the most profitable game of all time. It's shaking the game industry by syphoning off a huge percentile of money. The Sims never saw numbers like this in either sales (expansions) or subscriptions (the real money). Ever.

    #7, Warcraft III, mentions starcraft as an impossible comparrison for success, and yet in the same line implies that SC didn't even make the list. (Didn't fully RTFA
    • It's store sales, I rather suspect a lot of WoW sales are from online shops and the like, and the list is ONLY US sales.

      Also, Starcraft is pre2000, the list is ONLY games released 2000 or later. RTFA.
  • by Trails ( 629752 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @09:37AM (#16044439)
    The lower PC sales have very little to do with piracy. Fiascos like Anarchy Online's non-functional release are what almost killed PC gaming.

    I know several people who stopped PC gaming because a) some games are released in a state that doesn't even merit the term "beta" b) Windows is so flaky, buggy, prone to spyware. Gamer does not necessarily imply technical understanding, and console's are so easy. That's why consoles sell more games.
    • Console games have a much higher resale value and don't require CD keys. Many PC games register the CD Key to the user, meaning if you buy a used copy you'll have to HOPE the user will give you their login and password.

      Also, console games hold their value much longer than do PC games.
  • by Were-Rabbit ( 959205 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @09:41AM (#16044472)
    The whole PC gaming genre is only about 20 years old. This list would be far more interestng if they included the biggest-selling, PC games of all time. I don't doubt that The Sims would probably still be in the top spot, but I would be far more intersted to see how the following games fared:

    - The various Ultima games
    - The various Monkey Island games
    - The individual LucasArts games like Sam and Max, Maniac Mansion, and Day of the Tentacle
    - Myst
    - The various King's Quest games
    - The various Space Quest games
    - The various Leisure Suit Larry games

    ...and countless others. To take the last six years and compile a "most sales" is ludicrous. We're only talking 20 years or so. Would it have been so dreadfully hard to include all of PC gaming history?
    • I think you underestimate the Sims popularity and seriously overestimate the PC game buying population in the mid-90's and earlier. As a percentage of potential customer base, the Quest series probably rocked the Sims, but in terms of overall sales figures, anything that ends in the word Quest falls way short of the Sims base package sales.
      • You obviously missed the part where I said that I have no doubt that The Sims would still be in the top spot. I simply would like to see where other PC games have fared in the list of all-time, unit sales.
        • by hal2814 ( 725639 )
          I just glossed over the word "don't." My apologies. I imagine some of those games could crack the top 100 but I imagine it would be more depressing than anything. I'm just imagining some gomes like Falcon 3.0 that were absolutely HUGE at the time and how they couldn't possibly hold up to a world where you can get a wide range of PC games at you local Wal-Mart. And where you can get a computer to play those games on at that same Wal-Mart for $400 to $500 in today's money.
      • by Dadoo ( 899435 )
        As a percentage of potential customer base, the Quest series probably rocked the Sims...

        Actually, now that you mention it, I would love to see a list that had the top 100 games of all time, as a percentage of potential customer base. That would be an informative list. Any takers?
  • 1. Really smart and innovative games sell.
    2. 5-yr old level stuff like the sims also sells. Big Time.
    3. Adventures DO NOT sell.
    4. Sim-anything-economic is a sure-fire hit. Especially if it has rails somewhere in it.
    • 5. Idiots will come to forums and post detailed critiques of how they don't understand being placed above when they didn't even read the fucking article header saying that it was BASED ON SALES
  • by Hoplite3 ( 671379 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @10:14AM (#16044753)
    I saw this here before.

    Despite the hyperbolic title, it's an interesting article. NetGen is a US console game maker's rag, so that's its slant. People around here seem to hate it, but I feel like I have a better handle on their bias than the "for gamer" sites. You might argue about sales in Japan or the triumph of PC gaming, but that's not the point. This article is telling us what games sell in the US market.

    Success comes from
    1) Tie-ins (take Lego Star Wars with *two* tie-ins)
    2) Franchise
    3) Price (there are a good number of B-grade games that got moved to the $20 rack quickly)

    The analysis of the games is interesting. If you play console games in the US, this is what the people with the money are thinking about when they fund their next game. Mostly, its scary to me. Tie-in games are mostly crap, and I don't buy them anymore. Franchise games are a big part of the copy-cat problem in the industry, but we all eat them up because we have some familiarity with the game. Price-wise, it looks like many games would benefit from a lower price to sell more units. But the price might be firmly controlled by the console company. Free market it ain't.

    One of the gems in the list was some Iraqi invasion game that was bad by all accounts, but it sold well because it came out just after the start of the ongoing conflict. It's a disgusting use of suffering as marketing, but whatever I feel about it, it sold like hotcakes.
    • 1) Tie-ins (take Lego Star Wars with *two* tie-ins)

      Lego Star Wars is actually a damn fine game. It's like a "good parts" version of the prequels. Nothing beats hacking up motherfucking battle droids, on motherfucking Geonosis as motherfucking Lego Mace Windu and doing a motherfucking Samuel L. Jackson impression while doing so. "I am motherfucking Lego Mace Windu, motherfuckers. I will strike down with great vengeance and furious anger those who attempt to kill my motherfucking Lego buddies."

      The strategy

      • by Maserati ( 8679 )
        Thank you very much, I had somehow forgotten that I had only played the demo. That's going right to the top of my Gamefly queue.
  • by Rob T Firefly ( 844560 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @10:28AM (#16044880) Homepage Journal
    Slashdotters will want to link back to this and call "dupe" in 94 years.
  • Nice data... (Score:4, Interesting)

    by CaseM ( 746707 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @11:05AM (#16045213)
    World of Warcraft
    Publisher: Blizzard Entertainment
    Developer: Blizzard Entertainment
    Released: Nov '04
    Estimated Sales: 1.4 Million


    The hell? How can they use cite such a paltry number when WoW is at damn near 7 million active subscribers worldwide? 2 million in the State, alone!
    • 1) Where is "the State" exactly? Is that a state within the US?

      2) It does say it's an *estimation.* I believe it also doesn't count online sales. I'd bet the number is close to accurate.

      3) Frankly, the researchers of the article did a hell of a lot more work than you did, so until you have another number to counter them with (talking about over-the-counter PC game sales), maybe you should just trust them.
      • by CaseM ( 746707 )
        1. LOL, ok so I misspelled "the States". Stop trolling.

        2. Estimation? It's a widely known fact that World of Warcraft has 6+ million subscribers. 2 of them, alone, are in the U.S. This makes it abundantly clear that at LEAST 2 million units were sold because that's how we buy them - off the shelf.

        3. Oh, yes, I read it on the Internet. Must be true! (TM)
        • US figures only, not world wide. RTFA.

          Some people got the game from somewhere other than retail (Say, a 14 day trial they threw their credit card number into, for example), so those sales don't count in the 1.4 million. Retail sales only. Again, RTFA.
          • by daeg ( 828071 )
            Even with a 14-day trial you still must purchase the game off the shelf in the US for a valid game key.
        • 1. It's not trolling when I'm genuinely trying to figure out what the hell you meant. I thought "The State" might be slang for California or something. I apologize that my telepathic abilities don't seem to work over Slashdot... what you type is all I read.

          2. The article has numbers covering *retail* sales from *brick and mortar* stores. Do you understand? Do you think it might be just a LITTLE possible that just MAYBE some people bought the game over Amazon.com or some other online site? Just because
  • I noticed that the description for the Mahjong game (Ultimate Mahjong or some other such tripe) was pretty much a disclaimer for the actual game of Mahjong (the poker/rummy-like betting game with tiles), explaining that this particular game was actually the Solitaire-like game Shanghai, often called Mahjong because it happens to use Mahjong tiles. It's fascinating to me, anyway, since I love playing Mahjong. As for the rest: 1) Add Tycoon to any game and you can make a quick buck. 2) Despite the kiddy gam
  • Somehow, I find it really hard to believe that Command & Conquer: Renegade (#79) outsold
    Command & Conquer: Generals (not on their list at all)...
    • by Sigma 7 ( 266129 )

      Somehow, I find it really hard to believe that Command & Conquer: Renegade (#79) outsold
      Command & Conquer: Generals (not on their list at all)...

      It may be suprising at first, but when you do research between those two games, it makes sense.

      For reference:
      - C&C, C&C:RA were initially released, considered popular (there was almost nothing else.)
      - C&C:TS gets released. It was behind the times, but is good enough.
      - C&C:RA2 gets released. It is suprisingly popular, and surpasses TS. It

      • My point wasn't that C&C:G was better or cooler than C&C:R... but rather that I have a vague memory of hearing that C&C:G was EA's best-selling PC title that year (2003), which would have to put it on that list.
  • But wait (Score:3, Funny)

    by Klaidas ( 981300 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @01:26PM (#16046412)
    But wait, won't any karma whore copy the whole list to be rated +5 Informative?
  • by spyrochaete ( 707033 ) on Tuesday September 05, 2006 @03:00PM (#16047065) Homepage Journal
    FTA on Game of Life by Hasbro: (#38 on the list)
    As far as introducing new players to the basics of video game using mechanics they already know it's respectable, but otherwise it's just another example of unintimidating banality equaling huge gains.

    I have to disagree with this comment. My girlfriend and I happened across this game somehow and we play it all the time. You can play with the same rules as the board game or you can play an "enhanced" version with minigames instead of Life tiles. Every square shows either a still comic with one of many corny but funny captions, or an amusing simplistic 3D animation. Aside from the frills it's well programmed and bug free so there's nothing to intimidate computer noobs.

    If you can find this rare gem it will cost no more than $5. Even if this game doesn't interest you, consider it an investment. It really is fun for all ages.

    And for the record, this advice is coming from a FPS and Civilization gamer.
  • That list is TERRIBLE!!! Survivor, the game?! C&C Renegade?!

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