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Less Than a Minute to Hijack a MacBook's Wireless 390

Kadin2048 writes "As reported by Ars Technica and the Washington Post, two hackers have found an exploitable vulnerability in the wireless drivers used by Apple's MacBook. Machines are vulnerable if they have wireless enabled and are set to connect to any available wireless network, fairly close to their default state, and the exploit allows an attacker to gain "total access" -— apparently a remote root. Although the demo, performed via video at the BlackHat conference, takes aim at what one of the hackers calls the "Mac userbase aura of smugness on security," Windows users shouldn't get too smug themselves: according to the Post article, "the two have found at least two similar flaws in device drivers for wireless cards either designed for or embedded in machines running the Windows OS." Ultimately, it may be the attacks against embedded devices which are the most threatening, since those devices are the hardest to upgrade. Currently there have not been any reports of this vulnerability 'in the wild.'" According to this story at ITwire.com, they were able to exploit Linux and Windows machines, too. (Thanks to Josh Fink.)
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Less Than a Minute to Hijack a MacBook's Wireless

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  • Mac Users (Score:5, Funny)

    by Ramble ( 940291 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:13AM (#15838585) Homepage
    And in the background we hear 1000 Mac users screaming in horror...
    • by cbiltcliffe ( 186293 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:27AM (#15838663) Homepage Journal
      What, you mean all of them? Come on! I'm sure a few of them wouldn't have read this story!

      (For the humour challenged among you, this is a joke. I know there are a lot more than 1000 Mac users. Only stupid mods mod jokes as trolls and flamebait.)
    • Re:Mac Users (Score:5, Informative)

      by marklark ( 39287 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @11:31AM (#15840006) Homepage
      According to John Gruber of Daring Fireball [daringfireball.net], the affected MacBook was seen to be using a 3rd party wireless card. MacBooks (Pro or not) have wireless built in these days. This is a non-story. And this will probably be fixed soon by Apple for others.

      Next?

    • Re:Mac Users (Score:3, Informative)

      The title of the article is misleading: the macbook was not hacked using its normal built-in wireless adapter and its Apple drivers. The video (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/vid e o/2006/08/02/VI2006080201424.html) of the exploit *clearly* shows and explains that they are using an *external* third party wireless adapter which comes with its own wireless driver. This driver is the culpit and is succeptible to the exploit. The wireless adapter they demoes is widly used with PC laptop and the dri
    • You don't even have to read the article this time, just look at the site. This vulnerability requires use of an aftermarket wireless card. Who is going to use an aftermarket wireless card on a MacBook with that always comes with built-in wireless?
  • by Spy Handler ( 822350 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:14AM (#15838590) Homepage Journal
    My Powerbooks is safe. Apple is so much more secure than ^.#$ pwned u n00b wahaha
  • takes aim at what one of the hackers calls the "Mac userbase aura of smugness on security,"
    Expect to see plenty of post below, with this exact attitude. Many will begin by saying "This is not a virus" or noting you need proximity to take advantage of this flaw.
    • Well, to be fair, this is not the default behaviour for OS X. It will prompt you before connecting to an untrusted WLAN.

      It does, however, make me feel very smug as an OpenBSD user who has had to put up with Linux users telling me that running blobs in ring 0 is the 'pragmatic' thing to do.

      • Well, to be fair, this is not the default behaviour for OS X. It will prompt you before connecting to an untrusted WLAN.

        You don't need to connect to be exploited.

        It does, however, make me feel very smug as an OpenBSD user who has had to put up with Linux users telling me that running blobs in ring 0 is the 'pragmatic' thing to do

        Hmmmmn, while I agree that openBSDs security is superior to linux's in almost every way, I've never really understood the POV of someone who feels superior for using an O/S (Theo ha
        • True, you don't need to be connected to the WAP, but you do need to be in automatic association mode, which it is not in by default unless it detects a trusted WAP.
        • Re:Smug Mac users? (Score:3, Interesting)

          by Shanep ( 68243 )
          Hmmmmn, while I agree that openBSDs security is superior to linux's in almost every way, I've never really understood the POV of someone who feels superior for using an O/S (Theo has the right to be smug tho')

          I think a little smugness could be allowed, when a lot of people just put up with the wrong way of doing things, or put up with being trodden on by vendors, when the vendors should be at OUR mercy when it comes to their success. A few people (the smug) demand things be done right, securely and openly a
    • Many will begin by saying "This is not a virus" or noting you need proximity to take advantage of this flaw.

      Well, they would be saying that, if someone hadn't gone and corrupted their MacBooks via wireless exploit...

    • Expect to see plenty of post below, with this exact attitude. Many will begin by saying "This is not a virus" or noting you need proximity to take advantage of this flaw.

      Don't exepct all Mac users to be as dumb as the Apple marketing people who started playing the "Macs are more secure than...." card without checking with the nerds in Apple's development division first. If they had bothered to do so they would probably have been told that is not a good idea. That whole Get a Mac [apple.com] ad campaign acutally makes m
    • Re:Smug Mac users? (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Durandal64 ( 658649 )

      Expect to see plenty of post below, with this exact attitude. Many will begin by saying "This is not a virus" or noting you need proximity to take advantage of this flaw.

      Actually, they'll be pointing out that there the flaw is not in Mac OS X or even AirPort. It's in a third-party wireless card. And since MacBooks and MacBook Pros have AirPort built-in, what Mac user is going to buy a vulnerable card? The article was completely disingenuous, and the researchers were basically dickheads. Cool exploit, but

  • But... (Score:4, Funny)

    by jo_ham ( 604554 ) <joham999NO@SPAMgmail.com> on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:15AM (#15838596)
    Does this exploit run on Linu......

    never mind.

  • by KodeSlut ( 890122 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:16AM (#15838600)
    My reality has been shattered. Macintosh computers have been found to be less than perfect! Time to install WinXP.
  • In related news... (Score:5, Informative)

    by Kranfer ( 620510 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:19AM (#15838622) Homepage Journal
    In related news, there is an article at ITWire about Intel admitting to a security flaw with their wireless technology as well. Check it out at http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2161539/intel-ad mits-centrino-wi [vnunet.com]
  • Uh (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Moby Cock ( 771358 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:19AM (#15838626) Homepage
    takes aim at what one of the hackers calls the "Mac userbase aura of smugness on security

    This exploit is OS independent. How is this in any way indicative of Mac user smugness? Are they so smug that they made Windows and Linux boxes explotable too?
    • Re:Uh (Score:5, Informative)

      by TheRaven64 ( 641858 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:34AM (#15838700) Journal
      R'ing TFA, I found that the chipset in question is an Atheros. As a Free- and OpenBSD user, this made me feel incredibly smug since, unlike Linux, the OpenBSD driver (now ported to FreeBSD) for Atheros cards is entirely blob-free (and has undergone the same security audit as the rest of OpenBSD) and so is almost certainly not vulnerable to this attack.
      • ...and people still wonder why we say "open-source is better."

      • Don't be so smug yet, it still might be and exploit for your machine. I was talking to a wireless security guy a month ago about something like this, and he was telling me that every wireless card has an inbeaded driver for testing purposes before leaving the factory to insure it is working. Essentually this driver is still present after being shipped to whom ever is going to use it, and thus is still around when it makes its way into a computer. I was told that it is possible to invoke this drive since
        • Re:Uh (Score:4, Informative)

          by TheRaven64 ( 641858 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @11:38AM (#15840055) Journal
          was talking to a wireless security guy a month ago about something like this, and he was telling me that every wireless card has an inbeaded driver for testing purposes before leaving the factory to insure it is working

          There are two possibilities here. If the testing driver is in the firmware, then it will still be present in OpenBSD. Since the firmware does not run on the host CPU, however, compromising it is only useful if you can then return something to the driver that will be executed, usually be exploiting a flaw in the driver causing it to execute arbitrary code in ring 0.

          The other alternative is that this really is a driver you are talking about. In which case, it would not be present in OpenBSD, since the OpenBSD driver is a clean-room implementation and shares no code with the official driver.

          And if OpenBSD has no problem and its the OS driver that needs replacing, then Apple will just take your OpenBSD driver and port it to their system, problem solved. That is why they went with BSD, they can borrow from any BSD that is out there.

          I'm sorry, but that's not even remotely true. OS X uses IOKit for all device drivers, which is an Embedded C++ API. OpenBSD and FreeBSD use derivatives of the old BSD device API. It is possible to port device drivers between FreeBSD and OpenBSD relatively easily, because the API changes between the two have been small and incremental. If you try 'porting' a network driver from OpenBSD to OS X, then what you are really doing is using the OpenBSD driver as a substitute for real documentation and writing a driver from scratch. Doing this is likely to introduce bugs, since code (even good code) is a poor substitute for documentation.

    • This exploit is OS independent. How is this in any way indicative of Mac user smugness? Are they so smug that they made Windows and Linux boxes explotable too?

      No, I think they're really talking about the attitude that some, I say some Mac users have that somehow their machines and OS are invulnerable, the computer equivalent of Fort Knox. I find that people who spend too much time bragging about something often get their comeuppance when someone else more fanatical decides to prove them wrong. Yes, Macs

    • Re:Uh (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Daniel Dvorkin ( 106857 ) * on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:36AM (#15839578) Homepage Journal
      Windows users are always accusing Mac users of smugness, but there's nobody more smug than a Windows user observing that one (1) particular security vulnerability has been found for Macs. This strikes me as akin to someone with AIDS being smug because some previously healthy person has caught a cold.
  • by snackdog ( 567489 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:20AM (#15838627)
    In the video he uses a third party wireless card. Are other cards, such as the built-in card, similarly vulnerable?
    • by everphilski ( 877346 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:10AM (#15839338) Journal
      check Security Fix [washingtonpost.com]:

      During the course of our interview, it came out that Apple had leaned on Maynor and Ellch pretty hard not to make this an issue about the Mac drivers -- mainly because Apple had not fixed the problem yet. Maynor acknowledged that he used a third-party wireless card in the demo so as not to draw attention to the flaw resident in Macbook drivers. But he also admitted that the same flaws were resident in the default Macbook wireless device drivers, and that those drivers were identically exploitable. And that is what I reported.
  • More disturbing (Score:5, Insightful)

    by Dachannien ( 617929 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:20AM (#15838629)
    Even more disturbing, IMO, is the suggestion in the article that Microsoft will become the ultimate arbiter of device driver safety in Vista, by preventing device drivers from being loaded that they haven't checked out and approved.... because we all know that Microsoft are the experts when it comes to detecting and correcting software vulnerabilities.

    • Re:More disturbing (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Politburo ( 640618 )
      I'm surprised that MS isn't including an option to install unsigned drivers, and I bet there will be a backdoor way to do this in Vista. The reason I believe this is that if you can only install MS-approved drivers, it sets up a ton of liability for MS if one of those drivers ruins something. Yeah, it says they're not liable in the EULA, but we'll see how that holds up in court.
  • by VTrain0 ( 981525 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:22AM (#15838643)
    If the flaws are in Apple's drivers, why did they need to plug a 3rd party card into the MacBook? What user would ever plug a 3rd party redundant wireless card into their computer? Presumably, if they could hack Apple's drivers they wouldn't need the other card. All this video shows is a 3rd party wireless card with crappy drivers.
    • What user would ever plug a 3rd party redundant wireless card into their computer?

      Maybe to get 802.11a backward compatiblity? Or to upgrade to 802.11n when it becomes available? I realize upgrading the hardware is a foreign concept to most Mac users but there must be some out there do it instead of throwing away their old Mac and buying a new one.

    • by everphilski ( 877346 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:12AM (#15839365) Journal
      check Security Fix [washingtonpost.com]:

      During the course of our interview, it came out that Apple had leaned on Maynor and Ellch pretty hard not to make this an issue about the Mac drivers -- mainly because Apple had not fixed the problem yet. Maynor acknowledged that he used a third-party wireless card in the demo so as not to draw attention to the flaw resident in Macbook drivers. But he also admitted that the same flaws were resident in the default Macbook wireless device drivers, and that those drivers were identically exploitable. And that is what I reported.

      ( Looks like Apple was wielding a big stick ... )
      • What, they has two guys in black shirts with messed up hair standing around to beat them up if they used the Mac card?

        It makes no sense, and so it sounds like a load to me.

        Also, the fact that they go through all this work to find one possible flaw means that Mac owners should still be smug.

        No, I don't own a Mac.
  • Some of these look pretty serious, although there's not exploit circulating yet:

    Intel information about affected drivers [intel.com]

    Fixes can be found here [intel.com]

  • 3rd party (Score:3, Informative)

    by Tom ( 822 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:26AM (#15838660) Homepage Journal
    One should probably mention that they exploited 3rd party drivers and not the ones that the MacBook actually uses.

    And I was joking about this on a security mailing list yesterday. I mean, come on: 3rd party drivers that nobody is using anyways because the ones you get with the system are perfectly ok? What's next? Writing the exploitable drivers yourself?
  • by gnasher719 ( 869701 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:44AM (#15838751)
    Two important facts: Nobody has actually seen an active exploit; there is only a video available. Quite obviously anyone can hack into a Macintosh if it is prepared in the right way, for example by turning file sharing on and allowing everyone in the world access. More important, the video should a Macintosh notebook with an external wireless card. Now how many Macs have an external wireless card? For several years, all the notebooks have been shipping with built-in wireless connection, including the one in the video.

    I would suspect that the problem is that a wireless connection can be created without knowledge of the user, and a user who has a Macintosh that was made vulnerable but should be safe because it has no network connection would unexpectedly be unsafe.
    • Steps to make yourself vulnerable:
      1) Buy a 3rd party wireless card
      2) Install faulty 3rd party drivers
      3) Somehow bless 3rd party card so it's default instead of airport
      4) Running as an admin, turn on airport, don't find any preferred networks, join a random one, which happens to be the hacker's.

      In short, it's pretty hard to accidentally do this. Also auto-wireless-connect requires you to turn Airport on. It finds trusted/known networks first, and prompts if the network is not previously known. A
  • This actually proves the case for ONLY open source drivers on Linux, and integrated with the kernel. If the h/w vendor wants to support established protocols and differentiate on price and quality, fine. Else, Linux is better off without such dubious vendors spoiling the brand.

    And BTW, there ought to be a simple method to avoid Loadable Kernel Modules, and stick with statically linked and built ones, for reasons of security.

    Linux rather be Not Yet Ready for the desktop, rather than joining the Desktop bandw
    • Static kernel, for *what* reasons of security? http://www.phrack.org/show.php?p=60&a=8 [phrack.org] is ages old.

      > Linux rather be Not Yet Ready for the desktop, rather than joining the Desktop bandwagon, and becoming yet another Patch --> Update --> Service Pack --> Antivirus --> Unstable kind of a desktop OS.

      Funny, I thought it's already a continual patch->update cycle without even being reliable on the desktop already.
    • Linux rather be Not Yet Ready for the desktop, rather than joining the Desktop bandwagon, and becoming yet another Patch --> Update --> Service Pack --> Antivirus --> Unstable kind of a desktop OS.

      Hey this is Free Software! There's no "one" Linux. In this case Debian Stable and Linspire respectively tend towards either side of the choice you present. Granted, there are probably distros out there that are just as desktop-ready as Linspire but more secure, so you may not have to choose at all.
  • by pbrammer ( 526214 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:48AM (#15838777)
    Look for more information on the ISC Web site [sans.org]. Bottom line is this is not an OS issue, rather a "firmware/driver" issue.
  • Watch the video (Score:5, Informative)

    by eturro ( 804858 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @08:59AM (#15838834)

    The actual video is here [washingtonpost.com].

  • In other news Apple have moved to make Macbook pros [dailytech.com] safer. ;)
  • Maybe It's worth mentioning that instead of the internal airport device they cracked an external USB Wireless Device attached to the MacBook which is IMHO not "fairly close to their default state". (Although that does not tell us anything about the security of the MacBook's airport)
  • the Bottom Line (Score:5, Insightful)

    by spykemail ( 983593 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @09:19AM (#15838980) Homepage
    My God people do some research. These guys used a 3rd party card because they don't want to reveal what hardware is vulnerable. As for operating systems, the one (and only) reason they chose to use a Mac was for shock value. Windows and Linux are both vulnerable, though if there are any exploits you can bet good money they'll be on Windows and not Mac OSX or Linux.

    This is disgusting. No matter how many stories you run about Mac OSX and how it "really isn't secure" two facts will remain:

    1) It's more secure than Windows. There are both less flaws and less exploits. It doesn't matter why, it's still true and, most likely, it will remain true for a long time to come. It's difficult to prove which has less flaws because neither is open source, but I think all of you, no matter how devoted to Microsoft you are, know deep down what would happen if both systems went open source tomorrow. It's very easy to prove which has less exploits, and it makes no difference whether that's because of less flaws, a different user base, a smaller user base, or some combination of the three because the net effect is a safer OS. Even if you disagree with the statement that OS X has less flaws on the basis that you believe it is secretly harboring more crappy code than Windows my second argument still holds.

    2) There are almost never any malicious programs of any kind spread among Mac OS X users, unless you count people sharing copies of Windows XP to be installed with BootCamp. This may change in the future, but I doubt it.
    • Re:the Bottom Line (Score:3, Insightful)

      by cirby ( 2599 )
      These guys used a 3rd party card because they don't want to reveal what hardware is vulnerable. ...and then turned right around and said that Apple's hardware was vulnerable, anyway.

      Sounds like they need to get their stories straight.

      About half of the claims they make about this exploit aren't shown in the video, and much of the rest of the claims are exactly the opposite of what's actually shown ("any open wireless connection," yet they do a connection directly to the hacking computer, and we don't get to
    • Right (Score:3, Insightful)

      by sheldon ( 2322 )
      I'm curious.

      This "Fact" you say exists... What evidence do you have to support this fact?

      Are you sure it's not merely your opinion?
    • Re:the Bottom Line (Score:3, Informative)

      by brkello ( 642429 )
      It's exactly this attitude that will burn you guys some day soon. I am not devoted to Microsoft...I am devoted to reality. Mac userbase has been too small to care about. It's beginning to get larger. As long as you are connected to a network, you are not safe. This is true of any OS. Get off this whole "my OS is more secure than your OS" crap. There is no totally secure OS. Realize that you are vulnerable and take the correct steps to protect yourself. Don't say "well, at least I a more secure than
      • Re:the Bottom Line (Score:4, Interesting)

        by ummit ( 248909 ) <scs@eskimo.com> on Friday August 04, 2006 @12:23AM (#15844590) Homepage
        As long as you are connected to a network, you are not safe.

        Sadly true, though it's just as true that as long as you're alive on planet Earth, you're not safe, either.

        Get off this whole "my OS is more secure than your OS" crap.

        But, um, some OS'es *are* more secure than others.

        Realize that you are vulnerable and take the correct steps to protect yourself.

        I'm curious to know what "correct steps" you have in mind.

        If it's "use an antivirus scanner", that's a retarded or at least suboptimal strategy, because antivirus scanners are of course imperfect (they'll never make you perfectly safe, either), and at any rate all they do is patch over the fact that an OS that needs them has a fundamentally flawed security model.

        If it's "disable all the services you're not using", that's a pretty retarded strategy, too, because they should have been turned off by default, and the advice should really be phrased "don't enable anything you're not using."

        For me, one of the biggest "correct steps" is, "use OS'es that take security seriously and have a decent security model". So of course I don't use Microsoft OS'es. I'm sorry if that's an example of the "my OS is more secure than your OS" crap, but really: it's at least as valid a strategy as "use an antivirus scanner".

  • FUD tag on this story in 3..2..1... oh no wait - this is it.slashdot.org not apple.slashdot.org - maybe it will pan out differently; - this Apple exploit was on the front page for starters which strangely never happens with exploits listed in the apple section for some reason...
  • This is not a Mac/Windows/Linux/whatever issue. It is an OS architecture issue.

    This exploit is yet another reason why drivers should be run in user space. I can't think of a popular OS that does this universally... Linux has nooks, which is not the same thing, and Vista is going to run some, but not all drivers as services instead of in the kernel. Network drivers have traditionally been run in kernel mode for the sake of performance... When is security going to trump performance as a design goal in the ma

  • Maybe the switch to Intel wasn't such a good idea. It seems that while it has allowed me to run Windows on my Mac, it has exposed this abilitly to every Tom, Dick and Harry, too. And Apple scrapped Airport for the Intel wireless chipset why?
  • "Currently there have not been any reports of this vulnerability 'in the wild.'"

    Now that its been posted on Slashdot, there will be by the end of the day.
  • by WhiteWolf666 ( 145211 ) <[sherwin] [at] [amiran.us]> on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:17AM (#15839411) Homepage Journal
    1. It was done on Video, not Live. Show me the code. I want to see this "OS independent" remotely exploit any Wireless card in Promiscuous AP mode.

    I want to see this work on Linux, for that matter.

    2. It requires your system to be setup to automatically associate with all non-password protected APs. This is not a default setting, either; and none of the Mac users I know run their systems on this setting.

    People DO tend to run their systems on "Alert me to all unprotected wireless access points", but that's all.

    I don't see why everyone is so willing to accept this vulnerability. Their talking about attacking Atheros drivers on Windows, Linux, and OS X, with at least three independent driver teams working on them, with the Linux one being opensource (Madwifi). Furthermore, I don't see how you would get the same three driver stacks to exhibit the same buffer overrun to root-level excutable code, particularly a locked down Linux.

    It's not protecting anyone to hide this vulnerability. Releasing the information now would prove whether or not this is real, and would permit quick resolution to this problem, particularly for the MadWifi people.

    Until there's more information, I don't believe it. Even if I did believe it, without any details there's no effective way for me to protect myself. If the attack requires associating with an AP, most systems are not vulnerable. If the attack simple requires scanning avaliable APs, then every system out there is vulnerable unless Wireless is entirely disabled. Either way, it's stupid not to release the details, and reeks of more "Mac's aren't safe! See! Buy Norton Antivirus for the Mac!".
  • by Quiet_Desperation ( 858215 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:22AM (#15839452)

    I disintegrated a car with my mind!

    I have it on video!

    Of course, I weakened the car's frame with a blowtorch... and the car was packed with explosives... and there was the whole "lit fuse" thing... but still! I disintegrated a car with my mind. Some anonymous guy with a video says so!

  • by Bullfish ( 858648 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @10:31AM (#15839536)
    Now that all the bashers have had their fun, can we acknowledge that there is no such thing as a 100% secure computer of any sort as long as it is connected to a public network. I know it is not as fun, and takes the joy out of OS/hardware parochialism but it is true. As well, the behaviour of goofy users is neither Bill's, nor Steve's nor Linus's fault and there is not much they can do about it.

    I have run windows machines since 3.1 and DOS before that and never had problem. On the other hand I have shown people (relatives, friends etc) how to secure and maintain their machines and the next week I find them back to doing their own self-defeating behaviours.

    Someone found an exploit. Whoop-de-do. There will always be exploits found for all systems that people can screw with. There is almost always a way to secure against it. Almost always a large group of users ignores what is good for them and their machines and gets burned. Frankly, the platform matters less when it comes to these things than the user's behaviour.
  • by jpellino ( 202698 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @12:54PM (#15840673)
    So these guys take a third party USB wireless card,
    on a MacBook of unknown status,
    connecting to a specially scripted AP,
    and get owner privileges.

    Cuz this happens any time you use a Mac.

    Oh, and thanks guys for the admonition about proper testing. We'll have to write that one down.
    And for pointing out that wireless means there are no wires and you can sit in other chairs.
  • by Catbeller ( 118204 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @01:14PM (#15840850) Homepage
    Kids: PC's are owned through Windows. This is a fact. Own a PC, get hacked, this is the way it is.

    Macs are so secure that A STORY about a third party wireless carded being hacked gets national-level coverage.

    The PC owners rejoicing over the Mac's equivalence to their vulnerable platforms are being ridiculous. The quantifiable risk ratio between operating a Windows laptop and a MacBook is practically infinite, as there are no known virii for MacBooks, no known owning of MacBooks, no known security risks in operating a MacBook. At this point, hackers are well aware of a large installed userbase for Apple products, and certainly would attack them. If they could. Obviously they can't.

    Silly people. Don't forget to run your virus and spyware checkers today. And back up your data, you never know when the bad guys will nail your hard drive in new and exciting ways through yet another buffer overflow in Windows.
  • by MidKnight ( 19766 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @02:08PM (#15841312)

    Note that if you research the article a bit, you'll find that the "researchers" didn't hack the MacBook through the built-in wireless adaptor [go.com], they actually used a 3rd party wireless card plugged into it. They did it on a Mac just for the publicity storm they hoped it would generate (and lookie here, they were right).

    So all the crap about "Oh oh, now your Mac is just as insecure as a Windows Box" is really, well, wrong.

    And researchers deserves the double-quotes in my opinion; anyone with a nickname like "Jonny Cache" seems a bit silly to me in the first place.

  • by YAN3D ( 552691 ) on Thursday August 03, 2006 @02:11PM (#15841337)

    These two "hackers" seem quite sheepish and frustrated. Why are they attacking the Mac user-base when it's not the users that are the problem?

    One 'hacker' claims,

    We're not picking specifically on Macs here, but if you watch those 'Get a Mac' commercials enough, it eventually makes you want to stab one of those users in the eye with a lit cigarette or something,

    Users? Why is he picking on users here? The people featured in these ads are ACTORS hired by the marketing and advertising departmens of Apple. Nothing at all to do with the user base.

    "Mac userbase aura of smugness on security,"

    I don't think the 'smugness aura' is generated by the user base. It's apple's marketing and PR that make claims of being secure and virus free. Do they really think that an average user would come up with something sercurity related on their own? No, they just regurgitate what they hear from these ads.

    Maybe some day these guys will grow up socially and learn how to pick their battles. They are attacking the people that they should be trying to win over. They should instead of bringing the fight to the faceless corporations.

God may be subtle, but he isn't plain mean. -- Albert Einstein

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