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Comment Re:Test mode all the time? (Score 1) 123

No it doesn't. This is a common misconception. If you put it on a dyno and drove it the way normal people drive instead of the highly artificial way the testing procedure does, you'd get correct (i.e. dirty) results. If you somehow managed to drive it around on the street precisely within the testing envelope, you'd get clean results.

Comment Re:saving the world (Score 3, Informative) 180

You know how I know you didn't RTFA?

Since the creation of DoNotPay, Browder has begun work on a bot to help people with HIV understand their legal rights and one to collect compensation for people whose flights were delayed beyond four hours.

He’s also creating a bot that helps refugees apply for asylum, as part of the Highland Capital summer startup accelerator program. It will utilize IBM Watson to translate from Arabic to English.

Comment Re:Real estate and tourism (Score 1) 242

Sorry to repeat myself, but:

[P]rior to this year, 2014, SOMA had a total of 13 high-rise buildings. Right now there are an additional 16 high-rise buildings under construction or in various stages of development in SOMA, and these only represent buildings 400 feet in height and over; there are numerous high-rise buildings short of 400 feet in construction or planned. Two of the high-rises will exceed the height of San Francisco current tallest building, the Transamerica Pyramid at 853 feet. One, the Transbay Tower will top out at 61 stories and nearly 1100 feet.
In a span of a few short years development activity will double the number of high-rises in SOMA and increase the number of high-rises citywide by an amazing 40%.

Comment Re:Frivilous Law Suit (Score 1) 242

SF has height restrictions in many areas but high-rises are being built at a frenetic pace. How do you think these got built? http://www.climbsf.com/buildin... Or these?

From this 2014 article:

[P]rior to this year [...] SOMA had a total of 13 high-rise buildings. Right now there are an additional 16 high-rise buildings under construction or in various stages of development in SOMA, and these only represent buildings 400 feet in height and over; there are numerous high-rise buildings short of 400 feet in construction or planned. Two of the high-rises will exceed the height of San Francisco current tallest building, the Transamerica Pyramid at 853 feet. One, the Transbay Tower will top out at 61 stories and nearly 1100 feet.
In a span of a few short years development activity will double the number of high-rises in SOMA and increase the number of high-rises citywide by an amazing 40%.

Comment Re:The trademark just sailed through examination. (Score 1) 281

Well, if you put out a soft drink called Thankyou then you should legitimately have a trademark claim on anyone else making a soft drink with the same name, regardless of how generic the term is. "Sprite" and "Mountain Dew" are generic terms but in the context of fizzy sugar waters they are rightly protected. The point here is that Citigroup's trademark is explicitly for a credit card related thing. AT&T does not issue credit cards.

When Kitty Pryde's codename was Sprite, Marvel was not infringing on Coca-Cola's mark because Marvel was not selling Sprite-branded beverages and Coca-Cola was not printing comic books. No reasonable person (which is the standard for consumer confusion) would think that drinking Sprite would give them the ability to phase through walls, any more than an X-Men reader would think that Kitty Pryde was taking endorsements from Coca-Cola.

Citigroup's mark is in the realm of credit card stuff. AT&T does not issue credit cards AFAIK. That's how trademarks work. Cf. Apple Records v. Apple Computers. It wasn't a problem until the latter got into the music business. To this day you could legitimately market Apple bandsaws or Apple baby pacifiers or apple sauce, because Apple-the-corporation's mark doesn't cover any of those. Similarly, Microsoft can't stop Andersen from selling actual windows for houses.

Comment Re:Easy. (Score 1) 637

> use a password manager

You might still need to log into your things when you're stuck without any of your own equipment that you've installed that password manager on. Happens all the time, I need to check my email or library holds or whatever but my battery's run down and I have to use an unfamiliar or public terminal.

Use a unique pw that incorporates some aspect of the host in question in a non-obvious way. That is, your password-generation formula can't spit out "khasimSlashdot" and "khasimWoW" because once an attacker gets a hold of "khasimXboxlive" he's got a pretty good guess at "khasimCreditcard". A little obfuscation can go a long way. A slightly convoluted ruleset can be easily remembered yet difficult to derive sibling passwords from knowing just one of them.

Comment Republican Financial Acumen (Score 4, Funny) 113

"The campaign owed $1.2 million at the end of 2015 and has paid off about $308,000 since then, according to campaign finance records."

Did anyone expect anything else from an erstwhile rising star of the "party of fiscal responsibility?"

Or are they not even bothering to try to push that bullshit anymore?

Comment Re:Crop Rotation (Score 1) 203

That's not a stupid question, because that's exactly how we use insecticides. I used to live in a building where the exterminator's records were posted (in the basement, behind the laundry machines, and guarded by a leopard, but nonetheless public) and you could see how they'd rotate the insecticides every six to nine months. The exact rotation period may not have been arrived at through scrupulous scientific rigor, but even the schmucks whose awful job it is to crawl through disgusting basements breathing in toxic poisons know the whys of rotation.

It may be that resistance on a bacterial level is not that easily "forgotten" though. Even if a large majority of a bacterial population "forgets" its resistant genes, they reproduce so quickly that those who still carry the resistance will repopulate in very short order.

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