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The Internet

Berners-Lee Says Internet Will Make Kids Creative 274

ErikPeterson submitted a story where Tim Berners-Lee (if you need explanation, you're reading the wrong site) is interviewed about how on-line life will make our children more creative than us. He makes various points and predictions about what the internet will do.
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Berners-Lee Says Internet Will Make Kids Creative

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  • Presentation (Score:5, Informative)

    by Big Nothing ( 229456 ) <big.nothing@bigger.com> on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:48AM (#13499118)
    For those unfamiliar with Tim Berners-Lee, he is the Director of the World Wide Web Consortium.
    • And father of World Wide Web .
    • Re:Presentation (Score:5, Informative)

      by op12 ( 830015 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:55AM (#13499188) Homepage
      And inventor of the World Wide Web [wikipedia.org].
    • Let's give a rousing round of applause for slashdot groupthink!
    • From tfa:
      Tim Berners-Lee invented the World Wide Web.

      I CALL BULLSHIT!

      We all know Al Gore invented teh interweb! [sethf.com]
    • Re:Presentation (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Alex P Keaton in da ( 882660 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:15AM (#13499373) Homepage
      On the internet and creativity thing- I will play devil's advocate- What about situations where instead of having to figure out on their own what something is/does/means, a kid can just look it up on the internet? What does that do for creativity?
      Please, please explain something to me about these hyphenated names. I live in the midwest, so we don't see much of this silliness. But please indulge me:
      Lets says an offspring or Berners-Lee marries an offspring of another hypenated name family, let's call them Smith-Jones. Would the last name of their children be Smith-Jones-Berners-Lee? This could of course go on forever, until names are so long that we would need smaller fonts or wider paper. Seriously. Ridiculous.
      How do you figure our whose name goes first? By height? Alphabetically?
      And also, I believe that anything that increases your kids chance of getting the shit kicked out of him on the playground, whether it is giving him a ridiculous first name, or a hyphenated last name, is cruel. On the other hand, maybe if I have more coffee, I will stop acting like such an asshole.
      • I have a friend that I went to school with that has three sirnames. I beleive he has it this way because his father was adopted by a family with a hyphenated name but regained his biological sirname in adulthood and passed it to his son. At least that's how I understand it.

        It's written (with names removed because I don't have his permission to bandy his name about on slashdot for karma points):

        -

        If he doesn't thank his parents daily that he was not given a middle name then he probably should thanking t

        • Woops, that really didn't come out right because of the greater and less than signs I used, I probably should have previewed.

          It is written like:

          $GIVENNAME $SIRNAME1 $SIRNAME2-$SIRNAME3

          By the way. The standard policy is to concatinate the name with the mother's name first and the fathers name second. Thus, the standard sirname is always last nomatter how much crazyness has happened in the family tree.

      • Re:Presentation (Score:4, Informative)

        by MythoBeast ( 54294 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @11:44AM (#13500373) Homepage Journal
        On the internet and creativity thing- I will play devil's advocate- What about situations where instead of having to figure out on their own what something is/does/means, a kid can just look it up on the internet? What does that do for creativity?

        Creativity is fueled by the complexity of one's environment. Developmental studies on children are pretty clear on that. The more pieces you have to recombine, the more likely you are to recombine them in original and interesting ways. The internet just allows people to avoid the work behind recombining of things in ways that others have already done so, while still providing the benefit of learning the results.

        Please, please explain something to me about these hyphenated names. I live in the midwest, so we don't see much of this silliness. But please indulge me

        Indulgence granted. When two people with separate names get married and one decides to hyphenate, she generally places the new name at the end of her original surname so as not to disrupt alphabetization. For children, this results in having parents with two distinct and separate last names, and the child generally chooses between them whenever they decide to have a professional life.

        Marriage between two people with hyphenated names is generally cause for negotiation. There are no hard rules on whose name gets changed when you get married. Usually the female will drop both of her last names (hyphen included) and take the male's pair. Sometimes she won't bother changing her name at all. I haven't heard of any men taking a woman's hyphenated name, but it does happen for normal names, so it's not impossible. I have heard of couples who just dump the entire mess and invent their own new, legal last name.

        So the answer to your question is that it's entirely up to the couple to make it as complicated as they feel appropriate.
    • Re:Presentation (Score:5, Insightful)

      by Uukrul ( 835197 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @11:18AM (#13500075)
      Mod parent up.

      What do you think is better:

      a) Slashdot teenager style:
      Tim Berners-Lee (if you need explanation, you're reading the wrong site) is interviewed

      b) Profesional looking style:
      Tim Berners-Lee [wikipedia.org] is interviewed.

      It's your choice.
      • Re:Presentation (Score:3, Informative)

        by PhilHibbs ( 4537 )
        I was going to pick a) but now I see that you'd linked to the Spanish Wikipedia article, I am now tempted to say b) - it's a close call but I still think I prefer the story as written.
    • if you don't know what is a Tim Berners-Lee, you are on the wrong medium.
  • And... (Score:4, Funny)

    by sultanoslack ( 320583 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:50AM (#13499139)
    And he also predicts that the semantic web will take off Real Soon Now. ;-) (Where real soon is t + 5 years for continuously evaluated t.)
    • Re:And... (Score:3, Funny)

      by xao gypsie ( 641755 )
      And he also predicts that the semantic web will take off Real Soon Now. ;-) (Where real soon is t + 5 years for continuously evaluated t.) thankfully t and t+5 converge to the same Limit, though I don't know that we (as a human race) will be around for that...
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:51AM (#13499145)
    This is who Tim Berners-Lee [wikipedia.org] is.
    • Make them "more creative than us"? Don't you mean "more creative than we are"? "Us" is an object pronoun, dude. "We" is the appropriate subject pronoun.

      I mean if you're not careful, you'll say stuff like, "I like eating cheeseburgers more than her," when you really mean, "I like eating cheeseburgers more than she does." NOT the same, bunky.

  • by garcia ( 6573 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:52AM (#13499151)
    BERNERS-LEE: The creativity of our children. In many ways, people growing up with the Web and now the Semantic Web take the power at their fingertips for granted. The people who designed the tools that make the Net run had their own ideas for the future. I look forward to seeing what the next generation does with these tools that we could not have foreseen. ...

    I guess it will depend per person but I find that reading novels, poetry, and other "classic" lit is what causes ME to be more creative. Yes, that stuff is available online but we all know how cumbersome and uncomfortable it can be to read a novel on a screen.

    I believe the Internet will lead to more better global understanding and knowledge (it already has). It will lead to better news reporting to compete with those that read from multiple news sources and have a better understanding of the truth so that sensationalism and out and out lies will likely decrease. Finally, I hope that through this global awareness, political pressure for values and family-first as well as "Great Firewalls" will end as governments (and those that run them) grow to understand and embrace the openness of the world.

    Wishful thinking, especially when I believed that MY generation would understand these things and stop things like super right-winged conservative "family values" being pushed through the government. Instead, I am watching as people in America are growing up to want less and less freedom.

    I am still hopeful as we didn't grow up 100% immersed in the Internet from birth.
    • By the way, I enjoy the anarchy that dominates the internet currently. I don't think we need (or want) a governing body to tell us what we can or can't do on the internet. The community as a whole deals with criminals (spammers etc), and although not very effective, I would rather have spammers than people restricting my freedom (even if it is for my own good). I realise this is what happens in modern governments, but I believe things are good the way they are.
      • I don't think we need (or want) a governing body to tell us what we can or can't do on the internet.

        Exactly my point. I said that we need governments that understand and embrace global cultures -- including the Internet.

        We do NOT want governments that attempt to embrace isolationist practices with "Great Firewalls" and family values legislation.

        We want to foster global understanding in our young people. We need to give the human race the opportunities to learn as they wish including how to avoid content t
    • I guess it will depend per person but I find that reading novels, poetry, and other "classic" lit is what causes ME to be more creative. Yes, that stuff is available online but we all know how cumbersome and uncomfortable it can be to read a novel on a screen.

      Huh? I read stuff on a screen all the time. It's rapidly becomeing my prefered way to read a book, actually... You just need to find a device with a good form factor/screen for you. My current favorite is my Clie TH55, but an LCD desktop screen

    • I believe the Internet will lead to more better global understanding and knowledge (it already has). It will lead to better news reporting to compete with those that read from multiple news sources and have a better understanding of the truth so that sensationalism and out and out lies will likely decrease.

      The complete opposite is happening. Simple rumors get reported as fact and blown entirely out of proportion before they can be quelled.
      • Not necessarily.

        True, the web provide a much more fertile ground for rumours, gossip and flash-mobs of all kinds, but this is only a side-effect - the internet it primarily good for propagating memes.

        All memes are spread more easily via the web than ever before, which does mean we get more rumours and gossip-presented-as-fact (bad). However, it also means we get more news, grass-roots activism, whistle-blowers and whack-a-mole style propagation of information certain entities (corporations, governments, et
    • "I guess it will depend per person but I find that reading novels, poetry, and other "classic" lit is what causes ME to be more creative."

      Yes, well,we find you to be a bit stuffy.

      I kid! I kid!
  • It won't do anything. The question is: What will we do with (or should I use 'to'?) it ?

    • Search for porn? Which, I suspect, is why kids are more creative. They need better and better ways to circumvent net-nannys, purge histories, and switch to other apps when the door opens. This constant mental challenge pushes mental innovation to the limits.

      I suspect this is why boys are often more proficient with computers than girls - girls do not spend as much time learning about their computers through concealing their porn habits. Instead, they focus on the normal, surface visible features that do
  • Tools? (Score:4, Funny)

    by b100dian ( 771163 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:53AM (#13499169) Homepage Journal
    The people who designed the tools that make the Net run had their own ideas for the future. I look forward to seeing what the next generation does with these tools that we could not have foreseen...

    #1> Gimie you're IP and Ill hax0r ya rite aw4ay...!
    #2> 127.0.0.1
    #1 connection reset by peer
  • Children? (Score:2, Funny)

    by Spy Handler ( 822350 )
    "Online life will produce more creative children"

    And also more 40 year old virgins...

  • At what? (Score:3, Funny)

    by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:54AM (#13499181)
    Seems to me it would make them more creative at three things...

    1. Finding a way to send IM's to each other at school without the admin noticing.

    2. Find ways to get to game/pr0n sites that filters block.

    3. Find ways to appear working, while actually not.

    An interesting story from #3...
    A friend of mine was supposed to be doing some work for history at school, but didn't know that the computers had sound. (his work was in another window) He went to stupidvideos.com, and started to play a clip, but then the computer belted out, "Stupid Videos!" and then the sounds of someone doig something stupid. Thinking fast, he hid the taskbar and switched to the window with his work. The teacher never found out who it was playing the stupidvideos.
  • by Red Flayer ( 890720 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:55AM (#13499187) Journal
    "For instance, the Net does not change the number of hours in the day or the number of things you can keep in your head." (emphasis mine)

    Sure, it hasn't changed the potential of our memory -- but I would speculate that the internet has decreased the amount of information we do keep in our heads. Because information is so easily available, we need to remember less.

    Is this a bad thing? Not as long as the Web is available to us. It probably makes us more effective in general, since we have more info at hand. But if the Web were to fail due to apocalypse or something, I think we'd have some cache-ing up to do.
    • But if the Web were to fail due to apocalypse or something, I think we'd have some cache-ing up to do.

      I don't care if the internet fails as long as someone has a copy of Wikipedia backed up somewhere :P
    • Or perhaps it has changed the type of information we keep in our head. Instead of memorizing the details, we memorize the hows and whys and the whats. So in our head is a broad overview of a lot of problems or information, and when we need an answer, we need to know nitty gritty details, we know where to get it and how to use it.
    • Remembering useless information that we use the web for looking up will be the least of our worries in the case of the approaching apocalypse.
      • Sure, but a ton of information will be useful post-apocalypse. Easier to rebuild when you've got a knowledge base to rely on...

        I'd hate to be the person who has to reinvent billing mechanisms for pr0n site memberships.
  • by hcdejong ( 561314 ) <hobbes@@@xmsnet...nl> on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:56AM (#13499202)
    From TFA: The creativity of our children. In many ways, people growing up with the Web and now the Semantic Web take the power at their fingertips for granted. The people who designed the tools that make the Net run had their own ideas for the future. I look forward to seeing what the next generation does with these tools that we could not have foreseen. ...

    I suspect he didn't mean to say that our children will be more creative than we are. Just that we can't foresee what new applications will be developed, and how all that information will be used.

    'making kids creative' would be hugely optimistic given what's currently happening on the internet, with most people's publications being either mundane or regurgitation. I suspect most activity on the internet is passive consumption rather than creative.

  • Who would've thought that the inventor of the World Wide Web would declare it is good for people and society as a whole?

    Next up on Slashdot: Authors reviewing their own books!

  • No (Score:5, Insightful)

    by hsmith ( 818216 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:58AM (#13499222)
    What makes children creative is getting outside and building forts out of anything they can find. It is playing cops and robbers, cowboys and indians. It is riding a bike, playing in woods, meeting friends in real life. It is reading the book and figuring out in your head what the characters look like, what hte landscape looks like. It isn't watching a movie or watching a slideshow on the internet.

    The internet is fun, don't get me wrong. But it isn't helping people become more interactive and creative. it is a tool to do work, it is a tool to communicate. it isn't a new friend.
    • Re:No (Score:2, Interesting)

      I think that the internet helps people explore interactive content that would not otherwise be available, and interact with people from many walks of life, around the world.

      As long as personal/face-to-face relationships do not suffer, everything in moderation is OK IMHO.

      As a web developer/programmer, spending time online reading/downloading source from other sites allows me to be more creative in chosing the best way to code a requirement.
    • Re:No (Score:3, Funny)


      it isn't a new friend.

      Ahh! You! hmph... shut up!

      /me hugs Internet

      Don't listen to him... he's just being mean... you're my BEST friend!

      /me looks at hsmith angrily
    • Re:No (Score:4, Insightful)

      by Red Flayer ( 890720 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:59AM (#13499859) Journal
      "The internet is fun, don't get me wrong. But it isn't helping people become more interactive and creative. it is a tool to do work, it is a tool to communicate."

      Yes, it is a tool to communicate. It allows a much wider source of contacts with whom to communicate with. This can stimulate creativity that the activities you mention cannot.

      The internet also offers myriad ways for kids to express themselves, to formulate new indeas, and to try them out with their peers. Watching slideshows and movies is far from the only content available on the Web.

      Anecdotally, I was interested in a ton of subjects that none of my firends or family members were knowledgeable about. My info source: the library. Not convenient at all (did not go to often, and too far to ride the bike too). Plus, most of the library resources were WAY over my head when I was 10. The internet would have allowed me to explore those subjects easily.

      Do I think that the internet should replace traditional socialization? No way in hell. But does it stimulate creativity in ways that traditional socialization does not? You betcha.
      • Re:No (Score:3, Insightful)

        by slackerboy ( 73121 )
        I think there's some confusion about the difference between creativity and knowledge. Sure, knowledge is useful when you're trying to be creative, but it's not the same thing.

        In general, the internet provides a lot of knowledge (some of it even accurate), but whether that translates to increased creativity is debatable.

        In fact, some could argue that the increased availability of knowledge actually limits creativity. ("Why do I ned to come up a with a way to do that? Here's six different ways I found on t
        • Except that the exchange of information, and view of other stimuli, often leads to creative thinking.

          Look at Slashdot, for example -- yes, I'm being exposed to knowledge. However, my "creative juices" are stirred when I am faced with viewpoints and information that differ from mine.

          Also, the Web is no longer a passive viewing system. You've got blogging, forums, creative content hosting, all kinds of interaction that require creativity.

          And I totally agree with you that at times easy availability of
    • learning how to play and having TIME is all that is required.
      Books require imagination and help with it to a degree.
      Internet is more passive reading as far as html--and hardly any of that is like a book.

      I know many teachers, and I can tell you that american kids are LESS creative now than ever before. Internet doesn't have the power to undo the damage everything else causes.

      Necessity is the mother of invention. Kids only need to be given 1 lesson: to try to come up with your own activity. Parents only nee
  • Obvious (Score:3, Insightful)

    by JWW ( 79176 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @09:58AM (#13499225)
    Isn't this kind of obvious....

    Father of world wide web says that the world wide web is good for children!

    What else is he going to say? I mean I agree with him, but he isn't exactly an impartial observer.
  • about how on-line life will make our children more creative than us.

    *If* we can keep the predators out there away from them long enough.... sorry for being an incorrigible pessimist, but we all *know* "they're" out there.... How do you give kids enough freedom to become creative *and* keep them safe at the same time?
  • I disagree. (Score:5, Informative)

    by CyricZ ( 887944 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:00AM (#13499237)
    Take a peek at the GameFAQs.com forums. They are frequented by youth and young adults. Notice the terrible grammar, horrible spelling, and the inability of many posters there to post coherent, sensible content. Whether this is caused by a lack of proper education, or whether it is just the nature of message boards, is questionable.

    Personally, I would never let my children or grandchildren post at the GameFAQs forums without proper supervision. It's not about protecting them from the content there, but more the presentation of the content. I support creativity, and to be truly expressive requires intelligence and at least the ability to read and write with clarity and correctness.

    All a child will learn at GameFAQs is how to type and compose written works very poorly. While the Internet can help children become very creative, it can also lead them to become lazy in their communication habits. Frankly, I'd be adverse to letting a child, or even a teen, post frequently at forums like those at GameFAQs, just because of how their creativity could be negatively affected.

    • Re:I disagree. (Score:4, Interesting)

      by garcia ( 6573 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:07AM (#13499296)
      Take a peek at the GameFAQs.com forums. They are frequented by youth and young adults. Notice the terrible grammar, horrible spelling, and the inability of many posters there to post coherent, sensible content. Whether this is caused by a lack of proper education, or whether it is just the nature of message boards, is questionable.

      I don't need to go anywhere else. I can look right here on Slashdot. Not only do the various readers of Slashdot (myself included) have spelling and grammar mistakes, the "editors" do as well.

      I support creativity, and to be truly expressive requires intelligence and at least the ability to read and write with clarity and correctness.

      Are you saying that rap music (full of "foul" language and poor grammar) is not creative? Even though I don't particularly care for that genre, I still respect the artists' creativity.

      I'm actually disappointed that you would attempt to forbid a child to read a forum because you disagree with the spelling and grammar content. I don't feel particularly moved to commit spelling and grammar mistakes because others do.

      Proper education in the home and at school is what will help to change that behavior. Limiting typing and communications skills is the root of the problem.

      I suggest that you PROMOTE discussion forums, chat rooms, etc, as a way to teach typing skills, free thought, and creative writing.

      YMMV.
    • The problem is that it is virtually impossible to suffer any significant reprisal for anything you do on the Internet. If you write like on a forum in English class, you will get low marks and (hopefully) some sort of negative reinforcement from your teacher/parents. If you do it on the Internet, nothing happens beyond a few people writing theoretically insulting things at you. If you're secure enough that getting flamed doesn't bother you, you have free reign to post pretty much whatever you want on messag
  • by jurt1235 ( 834677 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:02AM (#13499249) Homepage
    This argument of the web making kids more creative is I think faulty. The reasoning:
    Smart & creative kids use the current environment of social structure to get to the information they want, or the tools they want. A library is one of those tools. The internet only makes it easier to access a lot more less structures information.
    What the net probably does, is make it less boring for some kids, and thus giving more creative but without the internet easily bored kids a chance to show their creativity.
    Boredom and attentionspan problems will however also take their toll on the internet, so to predict a more creative generation is not justifiable.

    Time will tell.
  • Lies! (Score:2, Funny)

    by OctoberSky ( 888619 )
    This article is BS. I have tried many times to explain to my girlfriend why I spend so much time with my boxen. She won't accept...

    1. I'm searching for deals on diamonds.
    2. Just 10 more minutes.
    3. It is cheaper than going out and partying.
    4. Theres nothing but crap on TV (which is true)

    If I told her I was working on "expanding my creativity" I am pretty sure she would "creatively" kick me in the nuts.
  • by ScentCone ( 795499 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:04AM (#13499269)
    Tim basically just states that since we're using his baby in ways he coldn't have foreseen, that certainly all the new stuff we'll see in the next 10 years will come as a surprise, too.

    Well, Tim... duh! But I actually have a bone to pick with the way the post spins his comment. The web isn't going to make kids more creative. Perhaps it will allow natively creative kids to draw on more information and savor the exposure to a wider world... but that's only useful if creativity, as a hardwired personality trait, and as a parent-nurtured habit/way-of-life is actually present.

    It's more likely that some creative children will leverage all of this great connectivity to grow up and make cool things happen, and that many more other children will leverage all of this great connectivity by sitting on their couches passively consuming that which the first group creates. Is there anything about humanity's adoption of any evolving communication medium that suggests otherwise? The availability of printing presses didn't turn everyone into authors, and the availability of cheap home video gear didn't turn everyone into creative filmmakers. And the availability of low-brow blogging and site authoring tools sure as hell hasn't made most kids any more creative - just noisier.

    I am looking forward to how really creative people continue to push the technology in unexpected directions. But I know better than to think that the creative/potato ratio will change in any meaningful way, Semantic Web or not, Tim.
  • How is being a passive consumer of information on the internet going to make children into active creators?
    It may give them a better background for applying creativity should they wish to be creative but I just don't see how it encourages them to actually be creative.
  • The start of the article lauds BL for "inventing the internet." This is BS. People were linking content LONG before BS using mark-up languages. Most on-line help systems provided such service. Do a patent search and you find all sorts of ringers...

    I guess the his whole stance is denial of other literature that states people in the information age are becomming less intelligent. But wait - creative and intelligent aren't the same thing are they.
  • by TooMuchEspressoGuy ( 763203 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:13AM (#13499353)
    I happen to agree with the article, in that the Internet WILL make our kids more creative than us. I mean, just look at what's happening now! Children and teenagers everywhere are breaking free from the artificial bonds known as "basic English" that the oppressive adult regime foists upon them! Why, just j00 wait and see! Soon these kids will be r future poets, artists, n arkitects! Like, OMFGLOLz! that wud b teh r0xx0r!

    ...ow. I think my brain cells just died.

  • Opinion (Score:4, Insightful)

    by danheskett ( 178529 ) <danheskett@gmai[ ]om ['l.c' in gap]> on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:18AM (#13499391)
    Jeez, one thing I notice is that the Internet has caused everyone - including children/young people - to think that just because they have an uninformed or slightly informed opinion on something they ought to (1) argue it blindly (2) shout about it indefinately and (3) brow-beat those who disagree. Livejournal et all are just bastions of uninformed, or slightly informed opinion. There was a time in discourse - political or otherwise - when it was acceptable to say "I have no opinion on the matter". Now it seems like if you haven't got a deeply rooted opinion on a topic within 5 minutes of it happening you are doing a grave disservice to the world. There was a time when I had a blog (well, before it was called that) and I ended it after a few years beacuse I was tired of people e-mailing me demanding to know what I wasn't "covering" a specific topic.
    • Jeez, one thing I notice is that the Internet has caused everyone - including children/young people - to think that just because they have an uninformed or slightly informed opinion on something they ought to (1) argue it blindly (2) shout about it indefinately and (3) brow-beat those who disagree.

      No, you're wrong! You're wrong! You're wrong!

  • Who is "Tim Berners-Lee", and what is this "Internet" that the article refers to?
  • Are you sure he created the World Wide Web? I thought Al Gore did.
  • My apologies to whoever it was who first said it, but creativity is nothing but a measure of how well one hides their sources.

    So, by that measure, yes. The Web will increase creativity.

  • Information overload (Score:4, Interesting)

    by ChrisF79 ( 829953 ) on Wednesday September 07, 2005 @10:33AM (#13499543) Homepage
    I'm not really convinced after reading the article (well, the one paragraph on the topic) that children are going to be more creative. I think by giving them so many channels of things to do, they're not forced to be as creative. I look at when I was growing up and the things I would do. I had Matchbox cars, legos, etc... Very static items that were only fun if I were creative. In fact, I remember spending a lot of time outside, finding L shaped sticks and pretending they were guns for a good game of cops and robbers with friends. Now, when I look at my little nephew, he spends a good deal of his time playing his gamecube. If he's not doing that, he's on the computer playing games on the net. Really, the only time he's doing anything similar to what I used to do is when he goes outside and rides his bike. The fact is, he really doesn't have to be creative because he has so many options at his fingertips that most of us didn't have when we were kids. Because of that, I really have to disagree with Berners-Lee.
    • I agree.. You give a kid the most expensive 'toys' and a few days later they are sitting on the couch saying they are bored. Granted, my oldest kid is only 6 but I gave them the cardboard box from my big screen TV and they played with that for days. (Unti l the big mean garbage man came anyways....)

      We cut a door and a couple of windows in it and tossed it out in the backyard. They colored it, played in it and god forbid, used their imaginations.

      From now on all they are getting for Xmas is the boxes

  • If by us, you mean you Mr "I-can't-be-arsed-reading-the-article-properly-an d -realising-that the-headline-is-just-an-attention-grabbing-out-of- context-quote" Taco then your summary is probably correct, however what he is saying is that the way that our children use the internet in the future will amaze us. For those of use who experienced the arrival of the Internet and the Web, something like Wikipedia is astounding. For our children something like that is perfectly normal and they will be able to use the
  • I'm not buying it (Score:2, Interesting)

    by Morinaga ( 857587 )
    He really doesn't give the reasons he thinks children will be more creative with internet access. Perhaps he meant better informed?

    For my sixth grade science project I made the monumental decision to do it on mold. I did not have Encarta on CD nor did the Internet exist. All I had was my science text book and those books at the library. I put bread in petri dishes and exposed them to various amounts of light, moisture, heat etc... These I used in my science display. I also remember my buddy Tim doin

  • Actually, all I've seen the internet do is teach kids to copy and modify slightly which is not creative at all. I've also seen a fair bit of plagarism.

    If you're creative, you're creative and the internet is just a tool to allow you to express that creativity. It will not make you creative.
  • ValuJet Predicts it will make kids fat and lazy.

    As far as proof goes, look at all the fat and lazy kids today.

  • how about the 4 kids here who spend all of their waking moments that they aren't doing homework farking around on 'neopets.com' ? hmm.
  • I wrote this huge rant about how I think computers and the internet are going to revolutionize society, and eliminate a lot of the redundancy and waste in government and education, but I figured I'd just get nailed and flamed as a pie in the sky optimist.

    So, instead of writing my vision of what society can be, I'll just say "I agree."

    Things never quite work out as you think anyway.
  • When did TBL start the crack habit that made him say stuff like this? Has he heard of Livejournal? Or Myspace? These are some of the most popular teenaged hangouts and it's full of drivel and bad english.

    Hell, even this post here has grammatical errors.
  • boy> mom says de internets making me more creativ!
    girl> cool!
    boy> i gato go, friends asking me to keep writin my power rangers fanfic
    girl> keep dat craetivity goin!

    (Gee, I can't wait to see what the future is holding for us)
  • In a recent e-mail interview with CNN.com's Lila King, the Briton, now Sir Berners-Lee...

    That's Sir Tim you illiterate twit! Stop reading the Internet and check you honorific syntax.

Those who can, do; those who can't, simulate.

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