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The Internet — Enabler of Guilty Pleasures 206

Posted by ScuttleMonkey
from the secret-britney-fans dept.
Carl Bialik from WSJ writes "'Sure, the Internet has revolutionized the spread of information and all that high-minded stuff, but its combination of reach and anonymity also makes it the greatest enabler of guilty pleasures ever invented,' Jason Fry writes in the Wall Street Journal. 'Indulgence is just a click away, and nobody needs to know, except you and some server somewhere.' For example: Fry, a rock snob, has a double secret life as a pop-music fan (secret no more, of course). From the article: 'If your secret love of "Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)" has caused it to creep into your iTunes list of 25 most-played songs, a simple right-click will let you reset the play count. If you want to hear Fall Out Boy, but would rather do so in secret, you can command Last.fm to ignore that the song was played — or delete it from your charts if you forget. Viewed from the standpoint of cool logic, this behavior is at least mildly insane. But who needs things that remind us of who we really are, as opposed to how we want others to see us — or how we'd like to see ourselves?'"
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The Internet — Enabler of Guilty Pleasures

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  • Oh so true (Score:4, Funny)

    by lixee (863589) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:34PM (#16146820)
    I caught myself watching MTV's "Wanna come in" few minutes ago and gave myself a slap.
    • by MoonFog (586818)
      Isn't this kind of like the stupid reality shows and tabloid magazines which people will never acknowledge reading/watching, yet still has a great knowledge of? Nothing new, the scenery has just changed and now the one who knows is the IT guy, not the clerk behind the counter.
      • "If your secret love of "Save a Horse (Ride a Cowboy)"

        Hmm...is this song from the soundtrack of Brokeback Mountain?

        No wonder he wanted to hide that one....

        :-)

      • Re:Oh so true (Score:5, Informative)

        by tehwebguy (860335) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:10PM (#16147126) Homepage
        i think the point is that you can be more secretive.. it doesn't take the kind of balls to do something online it might take to do in front of a store full of people (or even just one guy behind a counter)
        • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

          by Anonymous Coward
          Once, I was on vacation to Virginia to visit some friends, and we ended up at Suncoast Pictures. So I went to the back, grabbed the first tentacle rape hentai DVD I could find (Twin Angels, I think it was), walked up to the counter, slapped it down, looked the (cute young female) clerk right in the eye and said in my best slightly-above-indoor voice, "I'd like to buy this tentacle porn."

          Probably my finest moment.

          (I guess the point is that no everyone is afraid of what other people think.)
          (Then again, I'm po
        • by turgid (580780)

          i think the point is that you can be more secretive.. it doesn't take the kind of balls to do something online it might take to do in front of a store full of people (or even just one guy behind a counter)

          Oh, I don't know about that.

          Time's cruel weathering of the soul, an abundance of pre-middle-age cynicism, and maybe two or three pints of strong lager can permit (dare I say it, "encourage") a casual stroll into Harmony on London's Oxford street.

    • by severoon (536737)
      Yes, yes. When I think of indulging "guilty pleasures" on the Internet, I too cannot come up with a better example than listening to Fallout Boy on loop...
  • how pop? (Score:3, Funny)

    by justkarl (775856) * on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:35PM (#16146825) Homepage
    FRom TFA:

    Given such freedom, hipsters can let their inner dork out for a romp, extolling the virtues of the Arcade Fire by night and retreating to their headphones by day for a Hanson or Boston fix.

    I think that Boston and Hanson are two totally separate things. Boston can be filed quickly under Classic Rock, but any god fearing man who listens to hanson even behind closed doors, in my book, might need a psychiatric evalutation.
    • Re:how pop? (Score:5, Funny)

      by kfg (145172) * on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:40PM (#16146888)
      . . .any god fearing man. . .

      If God wants take issue with me he come on around and I'll mmmmmmmm bop 'im.

      KFG
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Frymaster (171343)
      Given such freedom, hipsters can let their inner dork out for a romp, extolling the virtues of the Arcade Fire by night and retreating to their headphones by day for a Hanson or Boston fix.

      and the internet is necessary for this how? waaay back in the days when the bbs ruled the earth you could still listen to dorky music in the privacy of your own home, away from the judgemental eyes of your peers. if anything, the internet makes this sort of clandestine pleasure harder. last.fm, filesharing &c make

    • by spun (1352) <loverevolutionary@nOSPAM.yahoo.com> on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:47PM (#16146945) Journal
      (Family Guy reference in case you didn't know)

      Peter Griffin - If you could have any woman in the world, who would it be?
      Quagmire - Taylor Hanson.
      Joe Swanson - Taylor Hanson is a guy.
        [Pause]
      Quagmire - [Laughs] You guys are yankin' me. "Hey, let's put one over on old Quagmire."
      Peter - No, he's actually a guy, Quagmire.
      Quagmire - What? That's insane. That's impossible.
        [Pause]
      Quagmire - Oh god. Oh my god. I've got all these magazines. Oh god.
    • Re: (Score:2, Interesting)

      by Anonymous Coward

      I think that Boston and Hanson are two totally separate things. Boston can be filed quickly under Classic Rock, but any god fearing man who listens to hanson even behind closed doors, in my book, might need a psychiatric evalutation.

      Well, this is nice and dandy, except for:

      • Hanson isn't doing mmmbop no more. Their newer material is very enjoyable, and not in a "teenage bubblegum pop" way, but more like a "classic rock/folk influenced lite rock" way.
      • Hanson actually puts on a really solid live show. I'm
      • Re: (Score:3, Funny)

        by Jamil Karim (931849)
        Well, it's good to see that the absence of your "stupid prejudice" has enabled you to no longer worry about how others might think of you, Anonymous Coward. =)
  • by Anonymous Coward on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:36PM (#16146838)
    If by "guilty pleasures" you mean jacking it to man-on-man pornos while refreshing slashdot in another tab, well ALL ABOARD THE SLASHDOT EXPRESS!
  • by nEoN nOoDlE (27594) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:37PM (#16146847) Homepage
    How does any of the write-up make sense? If I wanted to listen to New Kids on the Block without letting my Metallica friends know, I'd just go out and buy the tape and hide it in a different place than my regular tapes. The only person who'd know is me and the record store guy, and he cares less than some server somewhere since he probably doesn't keep records of every customer and every tape they bought. Whereas now, who cares if you could reset the play counter? Your friends are still gonna know if you have an N'Sync album on your iTunes because it's all there on the list.
    • If I wanted to listen to New Kids on the Block without letting my Metallica friends know, I'd just go out and buy the tape and hide it in a different place than my regular tapes.

      What is this "tape" you speak of? Are you into bondage? On the internet? With kids?
    • The only person who'd know is me and the record store guy, and he cares less than some server somewhere

      Sure, now your non free software vendors know you better than you know yourself. That's one of the reasons I don't use non free software. When Fry pushes the counter reset, Apple takes note that something bothered you about yourself. What books I read, where I go on the internet and what I read there, how much I paid in taxes, all of these things I'd rather keep to myself.

    • If I wanted to listen to New Kids on the Block without letting my Metallica friends know, I'd just go out and buy the tape and hide it in a different place than my regular tapes.

      Are you still in high school? I hope so, because having hidden tastes that you are ashamed of is pathetic. Who cares what the hell you like to listen to. They don't have to listen to it so screw them and anyone else that wants to judge you for such petty matters.

      If you are a metallica fan and like new kids on the block and are

      • I was just making an example and relating the story summary to around 15 years ago when those bands were both popular. The summary makes a point of people being ashamed of what they're listening to, and I ran with that concept.
  • by s388 (910768) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:37PM (#16146857)
    yes, it's revolutionized the spread of information, BUT

    BUT! it's become the greatest enabler of pleasures ever invented.

    horrible.

    everybody get back to your miserable farmwork!
  • by LordPhantom (763327) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:38PM (#16146860)
    True enough..... I caught myself tapping my toes to Nickleback's "Savin' Me" until I saw....

    BSG Season 3 promo [youtube.com]

    Some blogger far more witty than I commented that "The only show that could make them sound -good-". That's now my excuse. Yes, that's it.

  • by blueZ3 (744446) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:38PM (#16146861) Homepage
    First off, people who care that much about what others think about their taste in music (or food, clothes, whatever) are in need of serious psychological help. If you don't have the self-confidence to like what you like, and the hell with the rest of the world, you are (in my book) suffering the deepest kind of herd mentality that deserves disdain at every level.

    But more to the point, who in the world has other people looking at their iTunes playlist? If someone is looking at my PC and browsing my iTunes library, I suspect that they probably know me well enough to know of my love of 50's car songs (Jan and Dean & The Beach Boys) and penchant for listening to Weird Al's Starwars songs.

    I have to ask what type of paranoid thinks that the whole world is trying to ferret out their listening habits...
    • by greg_barton (5551) * <greg_barton.yahoo@com> on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:02PM (#16147056) Homepage Journal
      If you don't have the self-confidence to like what you like, and the hell with the rest of the world, you are (in my book) suffering the deepest kind of herd mentality that deserves disdain at every level.

      So, what you're saying is, "If you don't defy the herd, the herd should enforce herd defiance behavior!"

      Welcome to the herd, bubba!
      • Heh... you goth served him
      • by danpsmith (922127)

        So, what you're saying is, "If you don't defy the herd, the herd should enforce herd defiance behavior!" Welcome to the herd, bubba!

        I understand the remark was in jest, but honestly that wasn't what he was saying. He was saying like what you like without shame. It's a small subset of the larger "be yourself" point. Many people preach this shit without really believing it or doing it. If I liked the backstreet boys I'd ruin everyone else's ears with them by playing them loudly in my car as I drove pa

        • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

          by greg_barton (5551) *
          He was saying like what you like without shame.

          Sure, he said that. He also said that if you don't do that you, "deserve disdain at every level." The purpose of disdain [reference.com] is to apply social pressure to conform to a desired behavior. In other words, "If you don't like what you like without shame, you should be ashamed of yourself." :)
      • by Woldry (928749)
        "You're all individuals!"

        "We're all individuals!"

        "Excuse me, I'm not!"

    • by Otter (3800)
      First off, people who care that much about what others think about their taste in music (or food, clothes, whatever) are in need of serious psychological help.

      I think that column is supposed to have a hefty tongue-in-cheek element that's gone over pretty much everyone's Furious Nerd head...

    • Re: (Score:2, Insightful)

      by AndersOSU (873247)
      Bullshit

      Everyone cares what there friends think, it's just that there is a recent trend to cultivate the image that you don't care what people think - but it is still an image, and you are still trying.

      Think about it this way, what are the odds that the emo kid shows up to his friends party wearing abercrombie, or the comp sci geek gets a Ryan Seacrest style suit?

      The whole world doesn't care (I know I don't), but your friends might raise an eyebrow if they found Justin Timberlake's entire audio career (or s
    • by FooAtWFU (699187) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:12PM (#16147139) Homepage
      First off, people who care that much about what others think about their taste in music (or food, clothes, whatever) are in need of serious psychological help. If you don't have the self-confidence to like what you like, and the hell with the rest of the world, you are (in my book) suffering the deepest kind of herd mentality that deserves disdain at every level.

      Slow down, tiger. To some extent, this sort of behaviour (especially at, say, the high-school-ish age level) is part of a search for belonging, and (some people more so than others) are unfortunate enough to be surrounded by a shallow sort of a society where the price of belonging is to maintain certain superficial things - tastes in music, for instance. Some people, if they were found out to like certain things, would be soundly ridiculed, and possibly alienated. Not everyone has the strength to stand up in the face of social isolation. Some people might already be somewhat ostracized. Do they "deserve disdain at every level" for seeking the approval - or even the begrudging acceptance - of peers? I don't think so. The search for belonging, approval, acceptance... that's a basic human impulse.

      I'm not saying that it's spectacularly noble, or healthy, or The Thing To Do, but just... something as vehement as "disdain at every level" is too much.

      Now, excuse me Slashdot, pop psychology mode off as I return to listening to Enya...

      • by blorg (726186)
        To some extent, this sort of behaviour (especially at, say, the high-school-ish age level) is part of a search for belonging, and (some people more so than others) are unfortunate enough to be surrounded by a shallow sort of a society where the price of belonging is to maintain certain superficial things - tastes in music, for instance.
        Sure, I completely agree, but this guy isn't a high-schooler, he's a journalist for the Wall Street Journal.
      • "Do they "deserve disdain at every level" for seeking the approval - or even the begrudging acceptance - of peers? I don't think so."

        Sorry, I agree with the grandparent, they do. If you don't even have enough courage to say what you believe you are a coddled baby. Should racists just keep it all inside? Fascists? Ace of base fans (OF WHICH I AM PROUD TO STAND AMONGST).

        Be proud of everything that is you. Anything else and you won't lead a very happy life. It makes me sick to think that I should be responsibl

    • "I have to ask what type of paranoid thinks that the whole world is trying to ferret out their listening habits..."
      ... Jan and Dean... hmmm, the Beach Boys... um, Weird Al's starwars stuff...

      <scribbles>

      Eh? What? Oh, nothing...

    • by aussersterne (212916) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:14PM (#16147157) Homepage
      The respect of others creates real economic and political benefits that can't simply be written off with a sweep of the "if they don't like me, damn them, I'm me!"

      The "herd mentality" doesn't arise from simple moral weakness and the desire to be loved, it arises becuase we are social beings in a social world. You can build rapport with people and get better service, a better chance of being hired for the job, a better deal on your new car, a more beautiful wife...

      That rapport consists in large part of sharing likes and dislikes or at the very least not radically contradicting the personal prejudices and preferences of those whose favor you hope to gain.

      I'm not saying you should kiss ass always and pretend to love everything the boss loves in order to get a raise. Far from it, I'm more the type to speak my mind and suffer for it later, while watching someone else climb the ladder in my place, sometimes with regret, sometimes not. I don't make a value judgment about that or try to wear it like a badge of honor, my point is to say that the construction of personal cool isn't simply a neurosis that happens in a vacuum, it's a deliberate strategy based on the specific network of social relationships and interaction that surrounds a person, and each person would do better to consider it as such rather than to simply take a position in the "Either you're a member of the herd or you're a rebel!" dichotomy and stake it out like dogma, though of course your position on the "herd mentality" is also another such social marker that will endear you to some and not to others as well.
    • by Moraelin (679338) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:29PM (#16147262) Journal
      Actually, read some books on anthropology and you'll discover that it's more common and pervasive than you'd think. It's, in fact, so pervasive, that any poll asking people anything about themselves will basically get a bunch of more socially-acceptable lies, rather than the truth.

      Actually, let me rephrase that: it's also not about consciously deciding to tell a lie, or actually being paranoid that someone will rummage through your computer. It's that humans have their own ideal of "what I _should_ be like", and from there use selective confirmation to "filter" the real "I" into fitting that ideal. It's not even as much for the benefit of others, as for one's own benefit. People need to believe that they're, basically, better than they really are.

      If you will, it's sorta how every good Christian believes that someone else will go to Hell, but noone believes that he'll personally go there. If someone defines himself as a good Christian, he will distort his perception and memories to see himself actually fitting that ideal. He'll remember the time when he did something good and in line with God's commandments, but conveniently forget the times when he did nasty stuff that goes right against those commandments.

      And I'm not just picking on Christians there, as the same applies to everyone and everything else. Good citizen, upstanding pillar of the community, patriot, charitable, top-notch computer expert, l33t h4xxx0r, teen rebel, good parent, whatever. If you define yourself as X, you'll distort your perception and memory to see yourself fitting the X ideal more than you actually do.

      And, just for your entertainment or enlightenment (whichever you choose), here are some RL examples picked by anthropologists:

      E.g., when asked to define themeselves, most members of a tribal community all claimed to be hunters and warriors. In reality, they had in the meantime turned mostly into peaceful agricultors. (Civilization can creep up on someone like that.) Extremely had actually used a weapon in years, or even owned one any more. But their culture was so biased towards hunters/warriors, that everyone basically kept viewing themselves as one even long past the point where it had become a lie.

      E.g., a community defined itself as a shiny-happy model of cooperation where people help each other all the time, even help each other build a house and work together in the fields and everything. And everyone would cheefully tell you that they're still like that, and help each other all the time. The only problem is that the last time anyone helped another build a house was IIRC in the 50's, and they weren't helping each other work the fields any more either. But somehow kept believing that they do.

      E.g., during a crisis where meat prices went up, they polled the people in some communities about what will they do. And everyone said basically "screw this, I'm not paying this much. I'll eat less meat until prices come back down to normal." The problem? According to both the sales data _and_ sifting through people's thrash to see what packaging they're throwing away (yes, they actually did that), people were buying _more_ meat than before. Go figure.

      It may seem illogical to you (and maybe even is), but that's what humans do and how human society functions. In other words, welcome to the real world.
      • >If you will, it's sorta how every good Christian
        >believes that someone else will go to Hell, but
        >noone believes that he'll personally go there.

        Slightly OT, but no. A good Christian believes that
        he does indeed *fully deserve* to go to hell (as do all
        sinful, fallen men, like himself), but through the
        miracle of God's grace in Christ he will not.

        But more interestingly to most, probably, is to ponder this phenomenon you describe. People do indeed feel that there is a standard to be lived up to. Peop
        • But more interestingly to most, probably, is to ponder this phenomenon you describe. People do indeed feel that there is a standard to be lived up to. People are indeed troubled if they don't see themselves living up to it.

          Yes and no. The point is that everyoe basically has a different standard and judges himself. There is no one standard that everyone strives for. Some people want to be a teenage rebel, some people want to be a l33t h4ck3r, some people want to be a warrior, some people want to be an insidi

    • by quisph (746257)
      Someone who claims not to care what other people think, posting a list of some of his favorite musicians on slashdot -- with the karma bonus, no less.
    • by dswensen (252552) *
      This is one of those times I wish moderation went to +6.
    • by leoboiko (462141)
      You know, a few years ago I used to talk exactly like you, in the same bitter tone. I was of course pissed of that people kept picking on me for my habits, but the hole was deeper than I thought; later I realized I was struggling too much to be accepted by myself.

      Because I think it's stupid to discriminate against people based on tastes, I convinced myself that I shouldn't care about what the other, stupider people think about me. Problem is, I cannot help but caring. The fish live with the fish, humans
    • First off, people who care that much about what others think about their taste in music (or food, clothes, whatever) are in need of serious psychological help.

      Oh please. Our economy and culture are built on the assumption that people care about what others think. There are a zillion words for it: fashion, trends, branding, making a statement, memes, peer pressure...

      Not that I'm endorsing all the cultural trends that strike me as pointless and lemminglike. But I'm not arrogant enough about my own lifestyl

  • Clerks 2 (Score:5, Funny)

    by Rik Sweeney (471717) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:40PM (#16146893) Homepage
    I think they put it best in Clerks 2:

    "What's the point of having an internet connection if you're not using it to look up weird fucked up pictures of dirty sex you'd never have yourself?"
  • Anonymity? (Score:5, Funny)

    by HugePedlar (900427) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:41PM (#16146897) Homepage
    'Indulgence is just a click away, and nobody needs to know, except you and some server somewhere.'

    Tell that to those AOL users. ;)
    • by Eccles (932)
      'Indulgence is just a click away, and nobody needs to know, except you and some server somewhere.' ...and Alberto Gonzales.
  • by Yocto Yotta (840665) <catapults.music@g[ ]l.com ['mai' in gap]> on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:43PM (#16146913)
    The first thing that came to mind when I saw the title of this article was pornography, of the general and more dubious types. I was surprised to find no mention in the article. Under the same context as the music references in the article, is there a danger in making stuff like child pornography and beastiality readily available to anyone who knows where to look? Or does that fall into the "they were fucked up to begin with" category that we already apply to subjects such as violence in videogames?
    • The correct spelling is "Bestiality".

      I'm not quite sure why, but it might have something to do with the first four letters of the word.

      Oh wait - crap - that was supposed to be an 'anonymous guilty pleasure'...
    • Re: (Score:3, Insightful)

      by Kadin2048 (468275)
      I was surprised as well that they declined to mention those ... baser ... guilty pleasures, which we all know the Internet is just so accomadating of.

      As to the "dirty porn" question, my personal feeling is that the cost to society of censoring certain types of content are greater than the questionable benefits of not having it out there. I've never seen any really good analysis showing (with some proof of causation, not just corellation) that the availiability of internet porn has caused more real-world cri
      • by thebdj (768618)
        Alas, we cannot really regulate "smut." I mean porn is an art form, or I am sure a great many would argue. I do know it is an instructional video for many a teenagers and college students.
      • I think deviant individuals will probably always seek out whatever is taboo in their society

        I can tell you from personal experience that this is true. I was deviant way before I saw and pictures, videos, text, etc.; Before I even had access to the Internet.

        That said, I can tell you that the Internet has allowed me to find others like myself and come to terms with how I am and accept it. I know that a lot of people would consider me to be an immoral person, and I used to as well until I was able to do resear

      • "I think deviant individuals will probably always seek out whatever is taboo in their society"

        Guano: Colonel! Colonel, I must know what you think has been going on here!
        Colonel: You wanna know what I think?
        Colonel: I think you're some kind of deviated prevert. And I think General Ripper found out about your preversion, and that you were organizing some kind of mutiny of preverts.

    • by radtea (464814) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:59PM (#16147491)
      The first thing that came to mind when I saw the title of this article was pornography, of the general and more dubious types.

      The biggest effect of the 'Net hasn't been as an enabler of guilty pleasures, but as a means for the rest of us to know just how weird we all are.

      There were a number of mid-20th-century artistic movements, like the Dadaists, that claimed to be exposing the absurdity, hypocrisy, and perversity of the bourgois, but none of them came close to the sort of thing you can find apparently ordinary people doing on the 'Net. The imagination of the writers and artists fell far, far short of the reality.

      For example, type "* fetish" into Google, where * is any word, and you'll find the most remarkable array of strangeness. Presumably all of this has been going on since time immemorial, but now anyone can find out about it. I just tried it for "slashdot fetish" and got a hit on a site that defined it as "the desire to be publicly flogged for multiple posts of a news item." How guilty a pleasure is that?

  • pr0n (Score:4, Insightful)

    by Tx (96709) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:45PM (#16146928) Journal
    pr0n, and flaming people as an Anonymous Coward - chief guilty pleasures of most slashdotters (of course I'd never do the latter). In all seriousness though, I'm not sure what the point of that article is. As the author hints at, the "social" aspects of sites like last.fm actually make it harder to keep your musical tastes secret, and we regularly discuss here how all these "social networking" sites in general make information about people more public.

    So actually it seems to me that the opposite is true, the internet makes it harder to keep your guilty pleasures secret. Reductio ad absurdum, before the net, sure the guy in the shop might know you bought a Britney album, but the rest of the world would have no chance of finding out. With the net, however, you have to try to hide it.

  • Yeah (Score:4, Funny)

    by dtfinch (661405) * on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:48PM (#16146953) Journal
    You wouldn't want anyone to know if you're into this [google.com].
    • Awesome! (Score:4, Interesting)

      by Bill, Shooter of Bul (629286) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @02:17PM (#16147640) Journal
      I don't care who knows. That was incredible. Camp, yes, but beautiful for what it was. I loved those dancing icons in the background. Stil, it was missing something, or it was too long. It started off good, but it needs to turn it up to 11 to give it that extra kick. Let me know if you find any more of those.
      • by dtfinch (661405) *
        They're former Morning Musume members who go by the band name "Double You".

        They haven't released anything this year because one of them was caught smoking at age 18, and the legal smoking age in Japan is 20. They work for "Hello! Project", and their boss is also their songwriter, so he can suspend/punish them like that.
    • by tenton (181778)
      I'm covered. All my J-pop is tagged in Japanese. ^_^

      (I acutally don't really like Morning Musume or any of the Hello Project stuff...but I'm sure I enjoy equally wacky things).
  • by The MAZZTer (911996) <megazzt@gma[ ]com ['il.' in gap]> on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:51PM (#16146969) Homepage
    Now excuse me while I wipe my cache of slashdot pages and cookies, don't want my friends finding out...
    • Tools > Clear Private Data (Ctrl + Shift + Del)
      • Does that require that you have some extension installed? Or is it specific to the Linux version?

        I'm using FF 1.0.7 on Windows (woe is me) and that option doesn't exist in the Tools menu, nor does that key combination do anything.

        • You'll need to upgrade to at least 1.5. In fact I recommend you do so, there are some really nifty features (and there will be more nifty features in 2.0 as well).
        • The Clear Private Data menu command was added in FF 1.5.

  • by Lord_Slepnir (585350) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @12:52PM (#16146981) Journal
    I'm guilty of this myself. Sure, by day I wear an button with Elan and Banjo [giantitp.com] on my ESD lab coat, hang up pictures of my fiance and I dressing up like Pompey and Vaarsuvius (from the same comic) outside my cube, and reading Linux Kernel Device driver books for fun. But by night, when no one is looking, I'm over at sportsdot [sportsdot.com] and playing fantasy football.

    *cries*

  • Except Facebook, of course. Your secret life will be woefully exposed in blow-by-blow detail, there!
  • My website contains things like a guide to optimising animations on Linux [revis.co.uk] rather than, say, a guide to breeding monkeys videotaping the results and raking in a fortune on selling the results because if I go for job interviews guess what one of the things they look at is?

    Anything on the internet that has your real name on it is probably fair game, and because this is not limited to the internet we all self-censor all the time at home and at work. It's part of being an effective human being - if you always
  • i don't write for the WSJ, but i've always felt that if you like crap, there's no shame in it. why try to conform if you have to compromise what you actually feel? why lie to yourself? on last.fm, young man, there's a place you can go [www.last.fm].
  • Why not be honest? (Score:4, Interesting)

    by gosand (234100) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:02PM (#16147051)
    Seriously, why not be honest with yourself? You'll be happier. Personally, I like diversity in my music. So what if I like some of Kelly Clarkson's songs? Or Enya? Sometimes I am in the mood for that. But sometimes I need to hear Clutch, Pantera, or Megadeth. And everything in between. Really about the only thing I can't stomach is country, but I can do a little Hank Williams Jr or Johnny Cash every now and again.


    Now that doesn't mean that I haven't let a friend of mine live down that he once said he really liked Hanson. :) But I used to listen to lots of crap. So what? Live, learn, and for crying out loud, evolve! Try different things, allow yourself to honestly try to enjoy something for what it is. There are going to be people who listen to one kind of music their entire lives. That's OK I guess, but I just don't get it. I think diversity makes things interesting and builds creativity.

    • by CastrTroy (595695)
      I think this is exactly the way people should live their life. Do what you enjoy doing, and don't worry about what other people think about it. I mean, who cares if you think Crossroads [imdb.com] is a good movie. Teenagers care about this kind of thing, but I think that most people get over it, and realize that it's more fun to just do whatever you enjoy, rather than trying to do what people tell you you should enjoy.
    • by ahsile (187881)
      Enya is a wonderful artist. I thank my great Aunt for introducing me to her music. I listen to many other things as well, and I don't give a crap:

      http://last.fm/user/ahsile_ii/ [last.fm]

      I made a comment this morning about not liking the dixie chicks, but it's all a farce. Ever since I heard their rendition of landslide, I've been hooked.
    • by jb.hl.com (782137)
      I find it quite funny that Muse released a single which sounds extremely (uncannily even) similar to Britney Spears...which a lot of Muse fans are either disowning or trying to wave away. Interesting.
  • Mine [www.last.fm]
  • by Churla (936633) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:08PM (#16147103)
    Our brave US Attorney General is trying to get congress to make ISP's track every website you visit so you can go back to avoiding things you don't want others to know about.
  • In other news... (Score:5, Insightful)

    by PHAEDRU5 (213667) <instascreed@gmai l . com> on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:09PM (#16147115) Homepage
    Your guilty pleasures are a subpoena [slashdot.org] away from being public knowledge.
    • by TeamSPAM (166583)

      So the new weapon for terrorist would be to use steganography [wikipedia.org] on pr0n sites. That way all your traffic would put you in the pr0n addict bucket instead of suspected terrorist.

  • by rabtech (223758) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:13PM (#16147146) Homepage
    The internet also allows people with insane viewpoints to find like-minded nutjobs, with which they can circle jerk about their common opinions all day long and never need to expose themselves to an alternate viewpoint or way of life.

    Do you believe we never landed on the moon? Do you think horse-fucking is A-OK? Would you like to find someone to kill (with mutual consent) via erotic asphyxiation?... or worse, do you think sexually abusing little kids is acceptable behavior? No problem! The Internet has a message board or newsgroup just for you, that way you never need to think about your thoughts, actions, or obsessions.

    There is no such thing as deviant behavior on the internet!
    • Do you believe we never landed on the moon? Do you think horse-fucking is A-OK? Would you like to find someone to kill (with mutual consent) via erotic asphyxiation?... or worse, do you think sexually abusing little kids is acceptable behavior? No problem!

      You forgot money laundering and drug dealing, but the rest of the things you think about are interesting. Who put those ideas into your head? What is a circle jerk? What does this really have to do with an electronic network?

  • by Bones3D_mac (324952) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:16PM (#16147168)
    The new defense for the evils of all mankind:

    "The internet made me do it."

    Guess this means the devil can resume his duties as President of the United States now.
  • http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=5430343841 227974645 [google.com]

    "The Internet Is For Porn" ... A Warcraft animated musical.
    (very funny)
  • Q: What do you call a dedicated internet appliance?

    A: A Pornograph!

  • Euphemism (Score:3, Funny)

    by mypalmike (454265) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @01:41PM (#16147344) Homepage
    The article is about how the internet enables "guilty pleasures". I believe the author is using the term "pop music" as a euphemism for porn.
  • Melon with a hole in it, heated in the microwave.

    Dustbuster with corner attachment.

    I didn't understand the question!
  • It's the stuff in my head. Two weeks ago, I went to the mens room at the movie theater, and the Muzak got a disco-era BeeGees song stuck in my head for four days.
    • Re: (Score:2, Funny)

      by Rob T Firefly (844560)
      If that's the most disturbing thing that happens in your local theater's men's room, then things have really changed since I last went to the movies.
  • Grow some Huevos (Score:3, Interesting)

    by stealie72 (246899) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @02:01PM (#16147502)
    Seriously, how much of a wuss are you that you can't fess up to what you listen to, or silly sites you go to? My iTunes top 25 is probably embarassing as hell, but I don't care.

    Now, if TFA was focused on ministers that surf hotjapanesetenticlerape.co.jp every night, that would be a different story.
  • Why should we always have to be so fake? It's insane. If we can't even admit to our friends what music we listen to, I think there's something wrong that has nothing to do with the internet being involved or not.

    Example from my own life: Most of my friends listen to metal, some of them to old-school hip hop, with random bits of jazz, world music and electronica thrown in in some cases. Basically things which don't get in the mainstream charts all that much (or only in watered down form), and carry certain associations of snobbism with them. Now, although I enjoy most of these styles of music myself and listen to them once in a while, I also listen to lots of stuff a lot of people would automatically turn their nose up at because they'd consider it so extremely mainstream. For example, I'm a reasonably big fan of Phil Collins.

    But tell me - why should I be hiding that? When I like something, I like something. Why should I be having hour-long conversations about the virtues of metal and jazz when I'm among people and only be listening to my copy of Face Value [wikipedia.org] secretly?

    All my friends are roughly aware of what music I listen to, the bits they approve of as well as the bits they don't. And you know what? Although they largely detest Phil Collins, I still get respect from them, just for being the person I am, doing the things I do, saying the things I say, treating people the way I do. MY FRIENDS JUDGE ME ON THE BASIS OF WHAT SORT OF PERSON I AM, AND NOT ON THE BASIS OF HOW HIP I AM AND HOW ALTERNATIVE THE MUSIC I LISTEN TO IS.

    That doesn't just go for friends - I don't try to hide myself before people I've only just met, either. Because frankly, people that would only be interested in me as a person if I listened to The Mars Volta but not if I listen to Genesis are not the sort of people I want to be around.

    End of rant.
  • by aliendisaster (1001260) on Wednesday September 20, 2006 @02:13PM (#16147602)
    I show off my guilty pleasures. There's nothing funner than driving down around the mall looking for a parking space blasting "Mmmmm Bop" or "Safety Dance" as loud as possible. All the lil "I'm so emo. I'm going to go buy some black clothes" teenagers just look at you like WTF? It's hilarious.

  • When I grew up, everyone listened to either punk and metal, or hippie music and reggae, and not too much overlap between the groups. There were several people who listened to other things, but we all worked at a radio station, listened to each other's shows, but for the most part music was segregated by who you hung out with. Sure there was "fitting in" and such that other comments talk about but for the most part, music was homogeonous.

    Napster rocked my world. I got into raver music--something I halfhea
  • ... "Bachman", "Turner", "Overdrive".

    You ain't seen nothing yet. Great mate.
  • I sing along to Meat Loaf's "Bat Out of Hell" album when I'm doing circuit layout!

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