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Comment Granted, (Score 1) 311

Granted, there are reasons why you want to ban that. (and reasons to allow possession of such plans)

But these are exactly the same reasons that there are for restricting any plans for selected kinds of weapon to licensed manufacturers. If someone now only includes machine-printable plastic guns, that's nothing more that short-sighted, hype driven, blind "we had to do SOMETHING"..

Comment Re:A bot that flagrantly violated Blizzard's TOU (Score 3, Informative) 130

Which would made ir OK if the code was handed over as part of a court rulung or court order.

As much as I understood, handing over the source code was part of a settlement to avoid such a court ruling.

So most likely, that guy promised as a settlement something that he already sold to someone else.

OTOH, if this is a case in Germany, this might be something where the difference between Urherberrecht and Verwertungsrecht (ass opposed to the concept of copyright) may become relevant.

Comment Re:If you don't like the textbooks, (Score 1) 337

In another 10 years they will start to become our "leaders". in 40 years they will be in the Senate and House making even worse informed decisions than the morons currently there.

Don't worry. The current "leaders" are still making enough to send their kids to some "proper" schools. And tuition fees are high enough to keep anyone else out. And with textbooks like that, it's only making sure that no "mudbloods" can get into those circles by academic merits.Like the aristocracy of old, they prefer to stay among themselves.

Look at the presidential candidates: A few clans are already trying to turn the US into a family business!

Comment Hardware (Score 1, Interesting) 166

Espescially with games, it's where the bigger hardware variety turns around and bites Android in the back.

It's testing on 4 or 5 models vs testing a game on 300 phones.

Add the fact that iOS users are more willing to pay for Apps (they signed up with their credit card already so those 88ct are 88ct only and not 88ct plus signing up with your credit card at a vendor with questionable reputation of making profits with data)

Comment Re:wow (Score 2) 220

That is something completly differnt. Your example aims on size, but the article aims on expertise.

But even budweiser tastes better than my first homebrew. Not because they are big or small, but because I'm a bloody amateur (even if I had some decent brews by now) but they have people who learned how to make beer.

Comment Re:Um.... maybe... sometimes.... it depends (Score 2) 220

But those experts aren't regularly upgrading software I run on their cloud systems to fix security holes, nor monitoring my sites for exploits. So their expertise buys me little--other than the underlying infrastructure hopefully will be sound. That's all. That's not lot. .

Then by a plan where they do! If you rent out only infrastructure and still run your stuff yourself, there's not much difference to .. well.. running your stuff yourself. With all pros and cons.

Comment Re:No (Score 3, Interesting) 220

Depends on who you want to protect your data from. NSA may be guzzling every bit from any Amazon datacenter, but they won't (well, usually) ruin your company by selling your patent application to the highest chinese bidder a few weeks before you file it. And likewise, it does not take large scale data seizing to ruin you. It only needs getting hold of YOUR data.

But of course you're right if your data is of interest to the NSA more than to regular criminals. There is never such a thing as "more secure". There is only "more secure against X"

Comment Re:A secure channel and a fast channel (Score 1) 418

But then we're talking about the "breakable, just need a few million years to crack it" whicht started the discussion.

I think the key point to assess the security of a cipher for practical use is that it's common knowledge how long it would take to break it - which in turn means that you have to have an idea how or when it is broken.

"Spock, did you see the looks on their faces?" "Yes, Captain, a sort of vacant contentment."