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Submission + - $5000 Student Loans Default the Most (theatlantic.com)

minstrelmike writes: You can read horror stories about people with $150,000 student loans, but they aren't the ones with the most problems. The "typical for-profit student is a 24-year-old from a first-generation family earning less than $40,000, who eventually drops out of school. The completion rates for two-year and four-year for-profit institutions is about 40 percent and 25 percent, respectively." These are the people most at risk of default.

Submission + - Pending bill would kill a big H-1B loophole (computerworld.com)

ErichTheRed writes: This isn't perfect, but it is the first attempt I've seen at removing the "body shop" loophole in the H-1B visa system. A bill has been introduced in Congress that would raise the minimum wage for an H-1B holder from $60K to $100K, and place limits on the body shop companies that employ mostly H-1B holders in a pass-through arrangement. Whether it's enough to stop the direct replacement of workers, or whether it will just accelerate offshoring, remains to be seen. But, I think removing the most blatant and most abused loopholes in the rules is a good start.

Submission + - Almost Half of All TSA Employees Have Been Cited for Misconduct

schwit1 writes: Almost half of all TSA employees have been cited for misconduct, and the citations have increased by almost 30 percent since 2013.

Of the total allegations filed, 90.8 percent were against TSA officers, while 4.8 percent were filed against managers or administrators. Of the areas of misconduct, “Attendance & Leave” sees the highest number of offenders, while “Failure to Follow Instructions,” “Screening & Security,” “Neglect of Duty,” and “Disruptive Behavior” round out the top five.

It also appears that the TSA has been reducing the sanctions it has been giving out for this bad behavior.

Submission + - Maximizing economic output with linear programming ... and communism (medium.com)

mkwan writes: Economies are just a collection of processes that convert raw materials and labour into useful goods and services. By representing these processes as a series of equations and solving a humongous linear programming problem, it should be possible to maximize an economy's GDP. The catch? The economy needs to go communist.

Submission + - Library of Congress Hit With A Denial-Of-Service Attack (fedscoop.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The Library of Congress (LOC) announced via Twitter Monday that they were the target of a denial-of-service attack. The attack was detected on July 17 and has caused other websites hosted by the LOC, including the U.S. Copyright Office, to go down. In addition, employees of the Library of Congress were unable to access their work email accounts and to visit internal websites. The outages continue to affect some online properties managed by the library. "In June 2015, the Government Accountability Office, or GAO, published a limited distribution report — undisclosed publicly though it was sourced in a 2015 GAO testimony to the Committee on House Administration — highlighting digital security deficiencies apparent at the Library of Congress, including poor software patch management and firewall protections," reports FedScoop.

Submission + - Resolving IP address ranges conflicts in a corporate merger

SwingMonkey writes: Hoping the Slashdot audience may be able to offer some insight on this topic.

Caveat: I'm not a Network Engineer per se, but have spent some time playing in the networking space.

Currently I'm involved in a corporate merger. Both entities use extensive private IP address spaces internally, in the A, B and C class ranges, and the consolidated IP Routing table on each side runs into the thousands (expressed as a list of CIDRs) including inherited/aggregated collections of networks i.e. a /8 is further broken into a set of /16 which might be further divided into /23's or /24's. Inevitably there are entire network ranges that are in use on both sides, or overlap to some degree.

I've encountered this before, but never to this degree. Previously it has generally been a mostly manual effort to resolve the conflicts, but the size of the data sets in this case are somewhat daunting.

I've been looking for a data analysis tool, or visualization approach that would simply reviewing the data set, and develop a model of the conflicted spaces, but haven't been able to find much — hence turning to this forum (in desperation ;)

Thoughts?

Submission + - Clinton Statistically Has 945 Ways to Win the Presidency, Trump 72

HughPickens.com writes: Josh Katz has an interesting statistical analysis of the presidential race at the NYT that concludes that Hillary Clinton has about a 76% chance of winning the presidency, about the same probability that an NBA player will hit a free throw. To forecast each party’s chance of winning the presidency, the model calculates win probabilities for each state using a state’s past election results and national polling. But the most interesting part of the analysis is an interactive tree diagram (at the bottom of the page) that shows the paths to victory for each candidate depending on the results from the most important swing states and what would be required to compensate for a states' loss. Clinton starts out with 186 electoral votes from solidly Democratic states while Trump starts out with 149. What's left are the toss-ups states- states whose electoral votes could potentially be in play.

As it turns out Florida is the big prize. If Clinton wins Florida, Trump's only path to victory involves winning Pennsylvania, Ohio, Georgia, North Carolina, Virginia, Arizona, Iowa, Nevada, and New Hampshire. Although Florida is a state that tilted just slightly to the right of the country in previous elections, Republicans might not be able to keep up with Florida’s demographic shift any longer. Here’s the unsurprising reason: Trump has alienated Hispanic voters, making the last decade of demographic shifts even more potent. According to estimates, Trump is losing among Hispanic voters in Florida by a 30-point margin, up from Romney’s 22-point deficit in similar estimates of 2012. Without Florida, the Republican path to the presidency gets very rocky.

Submission + - SPAM: Bastille Day Terrorist Attacks in Nice, France. 84 Dead 1

MrKaos writes: Videos are emerging of another terrorist attack in Nice France. Police failed to stop the driver of a fixed axle lorry who sebsequently used the vehicle to plough through crowds of people celebrating Bastille day.
Claims are emerging that the driver was also using an automatic weapon and had a stock of grenades. France was still in a state of emergency from the previous terrorist attacks.

Eighty four are dead and eighteen are in a critical condition.

The cowardly Daesh (ISIS) have claimed responsibility for the attack against the citizens of France.

Link to Original Source

Submission + - Sharkey: a service for managing ssh certificates (github.com)

alokmenghrajani writes: Sharkey is our team's intern summer project. We are open sourcing it today.

In the enterprise world, engineers often ssh into hosts for the first time on a daily basis. This trains them to acknowledge the trust on first use prompt on a daily basis. It's even worse when dealing with VMs which get regularly re-imaged/move around.

Sharkey removes the prompt by signing the openssh certificates.

Submission + - 60 people killed and many more injured in terrorist attack in Nice, France (bbc.com)

An anonymous reader writes: A truck slowly drove towards a crowd, accelerated and then hit people on the famous Promenade des Anglais shortly after celebratory fireworks had ended. July 14th is a national holiday in remembrance of the attack on the Bastille which started the French Revolution. The truck reportedly drove more than a mile before the driver was shot and the truck stopped.

Submission + - 15 Year Old Bug in fMRI Software Could Invalidate 40,000 Brain Research Studies

HughPickens.com writes: Bec Crew reports at Science Alert that a new study suggests that a bug in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) software that has been in the system for the past 15 years could invalidate the results of some 40,000 papers. Since fMRI is one of the best tools scientists have to measure brain activity, and if it’s flawed, it means all those conclusions about what our brains look like during things like exercise, gaming, love, and drug addiction are wrong. "Despite the popularity of fMRI as a tool for studying brain function, the statistical methods used have rarely been validated using real data," say researchers led by Anders Eklund from Linköping University in Sweden. Scientists use fMRI scans to find sparks of activity in certain regions of the brain. During an experiment, a participant will be asked to perform a certain task, while a massive magnetic field pulsates through their body, picking up tiny changes in the blood flow of the brain. The trouble is that when scientists are interpreting data from an fMRI machine, they’re not looking at the actual brain. What they're looking at is an image of the brain divided into tiny 'voxels', then interpreted by a computer program. In their paper the researchers write: “the most common software packages for fMRI analysis (SPM, FSL, AFNI) can result in false-positive rates of up to 70%. These results question the validity of some 40,000 fMRI studies and may have a large impact on the interpretation of neuroimaging results.” A bug that's been sitting in a package called 3dClustSim for 15 years, fixed in May 2015, produced the bad results. The researchers also criticize the fMRI community for their “lamentable archiving and data-sharing practices” that prevent most of the discipline's body of work from ever being re-analysed.

Submission + - Alzheimer's gene already shrinking brain by age of three (telegraph.co.uk)

schwit1 writes: The Alzheimer’s gene, which dramatically raises the risk of developing dementia, is already affecting carriers by the age of three, shrinking their brains and lowering cognition, a new study suggests.

Children who carry the APOEe4 gene mutation , which raises the chance of dementia by 15 fold, were found to do less well in memory, attention and function tests.

Areas of the brain affected by Alzheimer’s disease, such as the hippocampus and parietal gyri, were also found to be up to 22 per cent smaller in volume.

Submission + - Physicist Simulate Sending Particles of Light Into the Past (earthmysterynews.com) 1

retroworks writes: While it doesn't demonstrate time travel to be possible, per se, University of Queensland, Australia, physicists have shown how the concept can work via photons. Actual time travel would require a very fast revolution of a black hole, or "wormhole", according to the review. The abstract for the paper "Experimental simulation of closed timelike curves" http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2... states:

"Closed timelike curves are among the most controversial features of modern physics. As legitimate solutions to Einstein’s field equations, they allow for time travel, which instinctively seems paradoxical. However, in the quantum regime these paradoxes can be resolved, leaving closed timelike curves consistent with relativity. The study of these systems therefore provides valuable insight into nonlinearities and the emergence of causal structures in quantum mechanics—essential for any formulation of a quantum theory of gravity. Here we experimentally simulate the nonlinear behaviour of a qubit interacting unitarily with an older version of itself, addressing some of the fascinating effects that arise in systems traversing a closed timelike curve. These include perfect discrimination of non-orthogonal states and, most intriguingly, the ability to distinguish nominally equivalent ways of preparing pure quantum states. Finally, we examine the dependence of these effects on the initial qubit state, the form of the unitary interaction and the influence of decoherence."

Submission + - Test of America's homeland missile defense system was an epic fail ... (latimes.com)

schwit1 writes: The system, known as GMD, has cost taxpayers more than $40 billion since it was declared operational in 2004. It is being expanded at a rapid pace despite stubborn technical problems that have undermined its reliability.

In carefully scripted tests, the system has failed to intercept and destroy mock warheads about half the time.

Project engineers for the Jan. 28 test had planned for the interceptor to fly within a narrow “miss distance” of its target to test the new thrusters’ effectiveness.

The missile agency issued a news release that day touting a “successful flight test.” The agency’s lead contractors were no less effusive. Aerojet Rocketdyne Inc., maker of the thrusters, said the new model “successfully performed its mission-critical role.”

That is not what happened. The closest the interceptor came to the target was a distance 20 times greater than what was expected, said the Pentagon scientists, who spoke on condition they not be identified.

“The mission wasn’t successful,” one of the scientists said. “Did the thruster perform as expected? No, it did not provide the control necessary for a lethal impact of an incoming threat.” A second scientist said the claims of success by the Missile Defense Agency and the contractors were “hyperbole, unsupported by any test data.”

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