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Submission + - 11 Predictions for the Future of Programming

snydeq writes: InfoWorld's Peter Wayner takes a long-term view of today's trends in programming to give a sense of where programmers should place their career bets in the years ahead. 'Now that 2017 is here, it’s time to take stock of the technological changes ahead, if only to help you know where to place your bets in building programming skills for the future. From the increasing security headache of the internet of things to machine learning everywhere, the future of programming keeps getting harder to predict.' How do you see technologies impacting the work of programming in the years ahead?

Submission + - Abrupt product termination consequences for Google?

managerialslime writes: I wonder how many good Google products never get adopted because IT executives (like me) are now too anxious about application abandonment?

When I was the CIO at a mid-size company, I rejected adoption of Google Voice, Google Wave, and Google Hangouts after seeing them abandon Google Desktop Search.

I reasoned that if Google could not give multi-year sunsetting like Microsoft, then they were not a partner I could rely on.

At what point will Google's advantage due to the flexibility of abrupt terminations be outweighed by resistance to adopting their products?

Hmm....

Submission + - ChaCha crushes AES on mobile (speedify.com)

An anonymous reader writes: It's been just a couple years since D.J. Bernstein's Chacha20-poly1305 cipher, first arrived on the scene. ChaCha is an encryption cipher intended for fast mobile performance. The real world numbers are in, and they're much better than AES on mobile devices. In tests, Cloudflare is seeing 3x the performance, and Speedify is seeing 2x throughput. Is it time for good old AES to get out of the way?

Submission + - This is your aging brain on the Mediterranean diet (latimes.com)

schwit1 writes: In a group of 562 Scots in their 70s, those whose consumption patterns more closely followed the Mediterranean diet experienced, on average, half the brain shrinkage that was normal for the group as a whole over a three-year period.

To glean how diet might influence brain aging, researchers tapped into a large group of Scottish people who were all born in 1936 and had many measures of health status and lifestyle tracked from an early age.

Around the time they reached age 70, 843 members of the “Lothian Birth Cohort” filled out a dietary frequency form that gave researchers a broad look at what foods they ate, which they avoided, and how often they consumed them. At about age 73 and again around age 76, their brains were scanned to gauge the volume of the overall organ and a few of its key components.

The researchers used the food-frequency surveys to divide the group into two — those who at least approximated a Mediterranean-style diet and those who came nowhere close. Even though many in the Med-diet group were far from perfect in their adherence, the average brain-volume loss differed significantly between the two groups.

Submission + - A Coal-Fired Power Plant in India Is Turning Carbon Dioxide Into Baking Soda (technologyreview.com)

schwit1 writes: In the southern Indian city of Tuticorin, locals are unlikely to suffer from a poorly risen cake. That’s because acoal-fired thermal power station in the area captures carbon dioxide and turns it into baking soda.

Carbon capture schemes are nothing new. Typically, they use a solvent, such as amine, to catch carbon dioxide and prevent it from escaping into the atmosphere. From there, the CO2 can either be stored away or used.

But the Guardian reports that a system installed in the Tuticorin plant uses a new proprietary solvent developed by the company Carbon Clean Solutions. The solvent is reportedly just slightly more efficient than those used conventionally, requiring a little less energy and smaller apparatus to run. The collected CO2 is used to create baking soda, and it claims that as much as 66,000 tons of the gas could be captured at the plant each year.

Its operators say that the marginal gain in efficiency is just enough to make it feasible to run the plant without a subsidy. In fact, it’s claimed to be the first example of an unsubsidized industrial plant capturing CO2 for use.

A “climate change” project that doesn’t involve taxpayer dollars? Is that even allowed?

Submission + - Location of mysterious Fast Radio Burst events pinpointed (bbc.com)

Netdoctor writes: Fast Radio Bursts (FRB) are massively powerful short-lived radio bursts from far-away sources, and so far a number of theories exist on what generates them. Recently several were detected in the same general location, which adds to the mystery, as any of these pulses would be powerful enough to destroy a source. Since this group of FRBs were detected with single radio telescope dishes, the exact location was difficult to pinpoint. BBC reports here with results from the Very Large Array in New Mexico being trained on the source.

Submission + - Ask Slashdot: Is Computing As Cool And Fun As It Once Was? 1

dryriver writes: I got together with old computer nerd friends the other day. All of us have been at it since the 8-bit / 1980s days of Amstrad, Atari, Commodore 64 type home computers. Everybody at the meeting agreed on one thing — computing is just not as cool and as much fun as it once was. One person lamented that computer games nowadays are tied to internet DRM like Steam, that some crucial DCC software is available to rent only now (e.g. Photoshop) and that many"basic freedoms" of the old-school computer nerd are increasingly disappearing. Another said that Windows 10's spyware aspects made him give up on his beloved PC platform and that he will use Linux and Android devices only from now on, using consoles to game on instead of a PC because of this. A third complained about zero privacy online, internet advertising, viruses, ransomware, hacking, crapware. I lamented that the hardware industry still hasn't given us anything resembling photorealistic realtime 3D graphics, and that the current VR trend arrived a full decade later than it should have. A point of general agreement was that big tech companies in particular don't treat computer users with enough respect anymore. What do Slashdotters think? Is computing still as cool and fun as it once was, or has something "become irreversibly lost" as computing evolved into a multi billion dollar global business?

Submission + - The Infuriating Math Behind Overbooking (popularmechanics.com) 1

schwit1 writes: “The most frustrating part? This math could be tuned to ensure the maximum number of tickets sold with a near zero percent chance too many people show up. Instead, the most profitable solutions often involve a decent chance a few passengers getting screwed, because the extra ticket sales outweigh having to put someone up in a hotel now and then. So just make sure you get to the airport early, and hope that someone else is running late.”

Submission + - Brett Stevens Q&A On Reddit, December 22, 8 PM EST (amerika.org)

alternative_right writes: On December 22, 2016 at 8 PM EST, I will be answering questions and expounding on life in general at Reddit’s /r/altright, a community for those on the Right outside the mainstream. If you do not have an account, sign up for one here and fire away with the questions.

Submission + - Donald Trump asks Boeing to bid on F-18 to replace F-35 1

bobthesungeek76036 writes: In a tweet Donald Trump states: "Based on the tremendous cost and cost overruns of the Lockheed Martin F-35, I have asked Boeing to price-out a comparable F-18 Super Hornet!". The F-35 idea was based on reusable parts for multiple military branches. Not really an apples to apples comparison unless Boeing can design a VSTOL F-18 which I can't wait to see....

Submission + - NIST Crowdsources Quantum-Proof Encryption (thestack.com)

An anonymous reader writes: The National Institute of Science and Technology has called for cryptographers to create the next generation of cryptography keys, intended to withstand attack by a quantum computer. The new algorithms must be created to withstand attack by a quantum computer, and NIST has suggested that the new algorithms focus on replacements for standards in public key encryption. Cryptographers may send proposed algorithms to the NIST for consideration to replace the three NIST cryptographic standards that have been deemed most vulnerable to a quantum computer attack. The three algorithm classes that may be replaced are those that deal with encryption, key establishment and digital signatures, all of which use public key cryptography. Dr. Dustin Moody, NIST mathematician, commented:"Post-quantum algorithms haven’t received nearly the same amount of scrutiny and cryptanalysis as those we currently use on today’s conventional computers. We need that to change."

Submission + - Remarkable New Theory Says There's No Gravity (bigthink.com)

Jeff Socia writes: Gravity is something all of us are familiar with from our first childhood experiences. You drop something — it falls. And the way physicists have described gravity has also been pretty consistent — it’s considered one of the four main forces or “interactions” of nature and how it works has been described by Albert Einstein’s general theory of relativity all the way back in 1915.

But Professor Erik Verlinde, an expert in string theory from the University of Amsterdam and the Delta Institute of Theoretical Physics, thinks that gravity is not a fundamental force of nature because it's not always there. Instead it’s “emergent” — coming into existence from changes in microscopic bits of information in the structure of spacetime.

Submission + - Conexant and Amazon bring Alexa to Raspberry Pi with âAudioSmart 2-mic Deve (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: Much of Amazonâ(TM)s success with Echo and Alexa is thanks to third-party developers and hardware. Today, Conexant and Amazon announce the AudioSmart 2-mic Development Kit. This add-on for the Raspberry Pi should enable easier development of devices using Amazonâ(TM)s Alexa voice technology. This could ultimately lead to further growth and adoption of the Alexa voice assistant.

Submission + - Korora 25 'Gurgle' Fedora-based Linux distribution now available for download (betanews.com)

BrianFagioli writes: If you want to use Fedora but do not want to spend time manually installing packages and repos, there is a solid alternative — Korora. Despite the funny-sounding name, it is a great way to experience Fedora in a more user-friendly way. Today, version 25, code-named 'Gurgle', becomes available for release.

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